Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 55

Thread: Onions and peppers

  1. #1
    Pete Guest

    Default Onions and peppers

    When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    after. . .
    or any combination of the above.
    Thx.
    Pete

  2. #2
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    > sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    > after. . .
    > or any combination of the above.
    > Thx.
    > Pete


    Pete,
    When sautéing I usually toss in some salt right after I get the veggies in
    the pan.

    Jon



  3. #3
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Pete <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    > sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    > after. . .


    During is how I do it. I let them cook down a little before I salt
    them. I also usually add a little oregano.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    cyberpurrs Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers


    "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    > sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    > after. . .
    > or any combination of the above.
    > Thx.
    > Pete


    I'd salt them after and lightly.


  5. #5
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    Pete wrote:
    > When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    > sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    > after. . .
    > or any combination of the above.
    > Thx.
    > Pete


    We don't salt them. There is usually enough salt in the sausages.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  6. #6
    Tom Biasi Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers


    "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    > sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    > after. . .
    > or any combination of the above.
    > Thx.
    > Pete

    I salt them as they sizzle to bring out the moisture.
    Tom



  7. #7
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:12:25 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Pete wrote:
    >> When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    >> sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    >> after. . .
    >> or any combination of the above.
    >> Thx.
    >> Pete

    >
    >We don't salt them. There is usually enough salt in the sausages.


    I would at least do a bit of salt..then taste. You aren't trying to
    get them to taste salty, but to help the flavors develop. Add tiny
    bits, let it cook for a bit..then taste. A lack of salt can make
    dishes taste flat.

    I am currently reading the new book by Thomas Keller and he has a page
    or two on the value of salting. As he says, salt is not to make
    things salty, it is to bring out flavor. If you salt prior and during
    cooking, it develops flavor. If you add salt afterwards, it just
    tastes salty. And he says if something tastes salty then, you added
    too much salt.

    He says it is one of the most valuable skills a cook can develop: when
    to salt, how to salt, and how much to salt.

    I tend to listen to what he says, since he is considered one of the
    best chefs in the world. Plus my own experience bears out what he
    says.

    Christine

  8. #8
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    Christine Dabney wrote:
    > On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:12:25 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Pete wrote:
    >>> When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    >>> sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    >>> after. . .
    >>> or any combination of the above.
    >>> Thx.
    >>> Pete

    >> We don't salt them. There is usually enough salt in the sausages.

    >
    > I would at least do a bit of salt..then taste. You aren't trying to
    > get them to taste salty, but to help the flavors develop. Add tiny
    > bits, let it cook for a bit..then taste. A lack of salt can make
    > dishes taste flat.
    >
    > I am currently reading the new book by Thomas Keller and he has a page
    > or two on the value of salting. As he says, salt is not to make
    > things salty, it is to bring out flavor. If you salt prior and during
    > cooking, it develops flavor. If you add salt afterwards, it just
    > tastes salty. And he says if something tastes salty then, you added
    > too much salt.
    >
    > He says it is one of the most valuable skills a cook can develop: when
    > to salt, how to salt, and how much to salt.
    >
    > I tend to listen to what he says, since he is considered one of the
    > best chefs in the world. Plus my own experience bears out what he
    > says.
    >


    We have medical reasons to restrict salt. If we didn't I'd salt a little
    while cooking.


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  9. #9
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:48:11 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >We have medical reasons to restrict salt. If we didn't I'd salt a little
    >while cooking.


    Oh, okay.

    There are a lot of people who don't have medical reasons, that don't
    salt..or salt at the end of cooking.

    One thing I have noted from several great cooks is that if you salt
    appropriately ( and taste, taste, taste!!!) during cooking, you
    actually use less salt than you do if you salt later. Again, they say
    food shouldn't taste salty, but it should just highlight the flavors
    and develop the ones there.

    But I totally understand the medical issues.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:12:25 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Pete wrote:
    >> When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    >> sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    >> after. . .
    >> or any combination of the above.
    >> Thx.
    >> Pete

    >
    >We don't salt them. There is usually enough salt in the sausages.


    Agreed. Onions and peppers don't need salt.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  11. #11
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:03:02 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:48:11 -0500, Janet Wilder
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>We have medical reasons to restrict salt. If we didn't I'd salt a little
    >>while cooking.

    >
    >Oh, okay.
    >
    >There are a lot of people who don't have medical reasons, that don't
    >salt..or salt at the end of cooking.
    >
    >One thing I have noted from several great cooks is that if you salt
    >appropriately ( and taste, taste, taste!!!) during cooking, you
    >actually use less salt than you do if you salt later. Again, they say
    >food shouldn't taste salty, but it should just highlight the flavors
    >and develop the ones there.
    >
    >But I totally understand the medical issues.


    Some people just don't like salt that much. For me the salt in the
    sausage would be plenty.

    Lou

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 19:27:36 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:12:25 -0500, Janet Wilder
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Pete wrote:
    >>> When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    >>> sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    >>> after. . .
    >>> or any combination of the above.
    >>> Thx.
    >>> Pete

    >>
    >>We don't salt them. There is usually enough salt in the sausages.

    >
    >I would at least do a bit of salt..then taste. You aren't trying to
    >get them to taste salty, but to help the flavors develop. Add tiny
    >bits, let it cook for a bit..then taste. A lack of salt can make
    >dishes taste flat.
    >
    >I am currently reading the new book by Thomas Keller and he has a page
    >or two on the value of salting. As he says, salt is not to make
    >things salty, it is to bring out flavor. If you salt prior and during
    >cooking, it develops flavor. If you add salt afterwards, it just
    >tastes salty. And he says if something tastes salty then, you added
    >too much salt.
    >
    >He says it is one of the most valuable skills a cook can develop: when
    >to salt, how to salt, and how much to salt.
    >
    >I tend to listen to what he says, since he is considered one of the
    >best chefs in the world. Plus my own experience bears out what he
    >says.
    >

    A little goes a long way. My taste buds were assaulted by salt on
    vacation. Europeans love their salt.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  13. #13
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    sf wrote:

    > A little goes a long way. My taste buds were assaulted by salt on
    > vacation. Europeans love their salt.
    >


    We could not eat the food in Palermo, Sicily. It was way too salty. Even
    the bread. Thank goodness there was a pastry shop across the street from
    my hotel. I lived on canoli. They don't salt the canoli.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  14. #14
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    In article <0058fda5$0$7070$[email protected]>,
    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:

    > We could not eat the food in Palermo, Sicily. It was way too salty. Even
    > the bread. Thank goodness there was a pastry shop across the street from
    > my hotel. I lived on canoli. They don't salt the canoli.


    When my ILs went to Tuscany, they were surprised to find that the
    bread had no salt in it. I imagine each region has its own issues with
    salt.

    I find I can't eat most restaurant food because it is so salty. I
    don't know why this is the case, because I don't limit our salt at home,
    I just use what we think tastes right, but when we eat out it sometimes
    feels like you could cut your mouth on the salt. Even at nicer places
    like the Melting Pot and El Gaucho we found the food to be too salty.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  15. #15
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:03:02 -0600, Christine Dabney
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 20:48:11 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>We have medical reasons to restrict salt. If we didn't I'd salt a little
    > >>while cooking.

    > >
    > >Oh, okay.
    > >
    > >There are a lot of people who don't have medical reasons, that don't
    > >salt..or salt at the end of cooking.
    > >
    > >One thing I have noted from several great cooks is that if you salt
    > >appropriately ( and taste, taste, taste!!!) during cooking, you
    > >actually use less salt than you do if you salt later. Again, they say
    > >food shouldn't taste salty, but it should just highlight the flavors
    > >and develop the ones there.
    > >
    > >But I totally understand the medical issues.

    >
    > Some people just don't like salt that much. For me the salt in the
    > sausage would be plenty.


    I find onions and peppers to be so sweet, especially after sauteeing,
    that I always give them a little salt.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
    cyberpurrs Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers


    "Ranée at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <0058fda5$0$7070$[email protected]>,
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> We could not eat the food in Palermo, Sicily. It was way too salty. Even
    >> the bread. Thank goodness there was a pastry shop across the street from
    >> my hotel. I lived on canoli. They don't salt the canoli.

    >
    > When my ILs went to Tuscany, they were surprised to find that the
    > bread had no salt in it. I imagine each region has its own issues with
    > salt.
    >


    Yes, I noticed that Tuscan cooks used less salt than most Americans I know.
    It suited me. If there are aromatic vegetables and spices I don't need much
    salt.


  17. #17
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected] on Oct Tue 2009 09:03 pm

    > One thing I have noted from several great cooks is that if you salt
    > appropriately ( and taste, taste, taste!!!) during cooking, you
    > actually use less salt than you do if you salt later. Again, they say
    > food shouldn't taste salty, but it should just highlight the flavors
    > and develop the ones there.
    >


    Some stuff like potatoes, pasta and green beans require salt in the cooking water or they just don't
    taste right.

    --
    Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Jimmy Durante



  18. #18
    --Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Oct 27, 7:47*pm, "cyberpurrs" <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Pete" <petechie...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    > > sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? *before, during, or
    > > after. . .
    > > or any combination of the above.
    > > Thx.
    > > Pete

    >
    > I'd salt them after and lightly.


    If you use popcorn salt, you don't get that graininess, so you can
    wait until after.
    http://www.diamondcrystalsalt.com/Cu...-Nut-Salt.aspx

    --Bryan

  19. #19
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers


    "Ranee at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> wrote
    > I find onions and peppers to be so sweet, especially after sauteeing,
    > that I always give them a little salt.


    They are sweet. I would salt them under certain circumstances, but not if
    they are in a dish with something like sausage or ham.



  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Onions and peppers

    On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 21:16:55 -0400, Tom Biasi wrote:

    > "Pete" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:b29ee6a2-013a-4[email protected]..
    >> When sauteing onions and peppers for Italian beef or sausage
    >> sandwiches or for fajitas, when to salt them? before, during, or
    >> after. . .
    >> or any combination of the above.
    >> Thx.
    >> Pete

    > I salt them as they sizzle to bring out the moisture.
    > Tom


    that's what i'm thinking as well. it's not so much for the taste - since
    not much is used - but as part of the physics of the thing.

    but i usually forget anyway.

    your pal,
    blake

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32