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Thread: Onion in water and vinegar

  1. #1
    john reeves Guest

    Default Onion in water and vinegar

    The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    onion prepared in this manner.

    I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    they do.

    Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?




  2. #2
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    "john reeves" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    >water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    >produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    >so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    >onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    >I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    >they do.
    >
    >Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?



    I'm interested, too. I'm sure the onion you use is as important as
    the proportions- but this might get you started. WAG- if you don't
    want to use the cukes- they probably provide 1/2 cup or so of liquid.

    It is my family's favorite for cucumbers in the summer-

    a couple 8" cukes, sliced thin
    1/2 sweet onion, sliced thin
    1/3 cup Rice Vinegar
    1 T white sugar
    1 t salt

    [maybe grate some ginger into it-- and toss in some toasted sesame
    seeds]

    Marinate for a couple hours in refrigerator. Lasts a couple days in
    refrigerator.

    Jim


  3. #3
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    "john reeves" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ijb6ec$sr0$1@news.eternal-september.or[email protected]..
    > The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    > water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    > produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    > so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    > onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    > I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    > they do.
    >
    > Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?
    >

    If you have a favourite Japanese restaurant that serves this you might ask
    them. Sometimes restaurants don't hesitate to give out a recipe or method.
    As Jim suggested, it probably also has to do with the type of onion. For
    example, Vidalia onions are sweeter than some other onions, so you'd need to
    know that as well. Good luck in your search!

    Jill


  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    "john reeves" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ijb6ec$sr0$[email protected]..
    > The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    > water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    > produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    > so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    > onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    > I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    > they do.
    >
    > Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?


    I don't know about the vinegar but I have a jicama salad recipe that calls
    for red onion. You separate out the rings and then soak them in cold water
    for about a half an hour. Then rinse. This makes them very mild.



  5. #5
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    "john reeves" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ijb6ec$sr0$[email protected]..
    > The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    > water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    > produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    > so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    > onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    > I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    > they do.
    >
    > Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?
    >
    >

    I've for years done the following.

    Prepare solution of 2TB salt, 2TB sugar, 3/4 cup vinegar, 1 cup water, and
    spices. Do all of these ingredients to your taste.
    Bring solution to very slight simmer. Put finely sliced yellow or white
    onions in simmering water for a few minutes. Off heat, and chill.

    I usually store the onions immersed in the above solution diluted with water
    to the degree of vinegar taste I want. White onions are milder than yellow
    onions, as we all know.

    Kent



    Kent



  6. #6
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    john reeves wrote:
    > The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    > water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    > produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    > so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    > onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    > I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    > they do.
    >
    > Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?


    Rick Bayless has a recipe for guacamole that is to die for. He calls for
    the white onion to be rinsed too. No vinegar of course, but the results
    and prepared recipe are wonderful so I don't doubt it helps in some
    fashion.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:34:35 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.


    I didn't.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  8. #8
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    'Julie Bove[_2_ Wrote:
    > ;1581647']"john reeves" [email protected]d wrote in message
    > news:ijb6ec$sr0$[email protected]..-
    > The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it
    > in
    > water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and
    > it
    > produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's
    > actually
    > so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of
    > 'just'
    > onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    > I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste
    > that
    > they do.
    >
    > Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?-
    >
    > I don't know about the vinegar but I have a jicama salad recipe that
    > calls
    > for red onion. You separate out the rings and then soak them in cold
    > water
    > for about a half an hour. Then rinse. This makes them very mild.


    What southern Mexican call "ensalada fresca" is little more than cold
    red onions, set in lime juice or vinegar, with tomatoes, cilantro and,
    at times, some oil. Chill and serve. Little salt and pepper and you're
    set. One of my favorite sides, along with well-made kimchee.




    --
    Gorio

  9. #9
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:34:35 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.

    >
    > I didn't.


    I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find that
    is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought that
    yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all. I
    use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like the
    stronger flavor better there.



  10. #10
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 22:10:27 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:34:35 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.

    >>
    >> I didn't.

    >
    >I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find that
    >is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought that
    >yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all. I
    >use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like the
    >stronger flavor better there.


    I think what sf is saying- and I *know* that I was thinking- is that
    saying yellow, or white, or red onions are sweetest is like saying red
    cars are fastest.

    The Texans have a yellow that is arguably sweeter than the Vidalia of
    GA-- and in NY there are red ones that are sweeter than a lot of
    yellow or white. And there are onions of all colors with a bit of
    bite to them.

    The variety, the soil, and the growing conditions are what makes an
    onion sweet [or not]-- the color has nothing to do with it.

    Jim

  11. #11
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 22:10:27 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:34:35 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.
    >>>
    >>> I didn't.

    >>
    >>I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find
    >>that
    >>is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought
    >>that
    >>yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all.
    >>I
    >>use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like
    >>the
    >>stronger flavor better there.

    >
    > I think what sf is saying- and I *know* that I was thinking- is that
    > saying yellow, or white, or red onions are sweetest is like saying red
    > cars are fastest.
    >

    LOL! But did you know the insurance rates for red cars are often higher?
    The reasoning being red cars are usually sport cars.

    > The Texans have a yellow that is arguably sweeter than the Vidalia of
    > The variety, the soil, and the growing conditions are what makes an
    > onion sweet [or not]-- the color has nothing to do with it.
    >
    > Jim





  12. #12
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    On 2/15/2011 8:31 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 22:10:27 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:34:35 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.
    >>>>
    >>>> I didn't.
    >>>
    >>> I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I
    >>> find that
    >>> is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought
    >>> that
    >>> yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at
    >>> all. I
    >>> use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just
    >>> like the
    >>> stronger flavor better there.

    >>
    >> I think what sf is saying- and I *know* that I was thinking- is that
    >> saying yellow, or white, or red onions are sweetest is like saying red
    >> cars are fastest.
    >>

    > LOL! But did you know the insurance rates for red cars are often higher?
    > The reasoning being red cars are usually sport cars.
    >
    >> The Texans have a yellow that is arguably sweeter than the Vidalia of
    >> The variety, the soil, and the growing conditions are what makes an
    >> onion sweet [or not]-- the color has nothing to do with it.
    >>
    >> Jim

    >
    >
    >

    I wonder if salt is used to get the mild flavor in the onion salad?
    Certainly, sprinkling salt on sliced onion and then rinsing off after 30
    minutes seems to work. I often do that for the onion component of a
    Greek salad.

    Here's an Indian recipe using a similar idea.

    Onion –Tomato Salad
    Piaz aur Tamatar ka Salad (from Madhu Gadia’s “New Indian Home Cooking”.)
    This salad is easy to prepare and is a colorful addition to any meal.
    Marinating the onions in salt and lemon juice reduces the pungency and
    makes them sweet and tangy.
    1 medium red onion, cut into ¼-inch wedges
    3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 medium tomatoes, sliced into ¼-inch wedges
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    Combine the onion, lemon juice and ¾ teaspoon of the salt in a bowl.
    Cover and marinate for 20 minutes or longer, stirring occasionally.
    Drain and discard the juice.
    Add the tomatoes and sprinkle with the remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and
    black pepper. Toss lightly to mix.
    Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.


    --
    James Silverton, Potomac

  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    On 15/02/2011 1:10 AM, Julie Bove wrote:

    >>
    >>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.

    >>
    >> I didn't.

    >
    > I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find that
    > is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought that
    > yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all. I
    > use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like the
    > stronger flavor better there.


    I always found red onions a little hard to handle myself. I have also
    found those big white onions to be a little harsh.



  14. #14
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    On 2/15/2011 6:41 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

    > The Texans have a yellow that is arguably sweeter than the Vidalia of
    > GA-- and in NY there are red ones that are sweeter than a lot of
    > yellow or white. And there are onions of all colors with a bit of
    > bite to them.


    They are called "1015" onions. They got their name because the sets are
    planted on or around October 15. We buy a 50# bag of them every year, if
    we can, and we adore them. The 50# bag is usually less than $20. They
    don't expect that our recent frosts have hurt the onion crop. Let's
    keep our fingers crossed.
    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  15. #15
    L G Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 22:10:27 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:34:35 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.
    >>>>
    >>>> I didn't.
    >>>
    >>> I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I
    >>> find that
    >>> is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had
    >>> thought that
    >>> yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at
    >>> all. I
    >>> use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just
    >>> like the
    >>> stronger flavor better there.

    >>
    >> I think what sf is saying- and I *know* that I was thinking- is that
    >> saying yellow, or white, or red onions are sweetest is like saying red
    >> cars are fastest.
    >>

    > LOL! But did you know the insurance rates for red cars are often
    > higher? The reasoning being red cars are usually sport cars.
    >
    >> The Texans have a yellow that is arguably sweeter than the Vidalia of
    >> The variety, the soil, and the growing conditions are what makes an
    >> onion sweet [or not]-- the color has nothing to do with it.
    >>
    >> Jim

    >
    >
    >

    Bull****. Did you know that my insurance company has no idea what color
    my cars are?

  16. #16
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar



    john reeves wrote:
    >
    > The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    > water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    > produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's actually
    > so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists of 'just'
    > onion prepared in this manner.
    >
    > I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    > they do.
    >
    > Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?


    Can't help you with that. When I ran across rather acrid onions, thinly
    slicing them and salting them for 15 mins or so toned them down. Give
    them a rinse and drain well.

  17. #17
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    In article <fkx6p.14637$[email protected]> ,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On 15/02/2011 1:10 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > >>
    > >>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.
    > >>
    > >> I didn't.

    > >
    > > I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find that
    > > is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought that
    > > yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all. I
    > > use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like the
    > > stronger flavor better there.

    >
    > I always found red onions a little hard to handle myself. I have also
    > found those big white onions to be a little harsh.



    Don't confuse the yellow onion and the Vidalia onion. They look the
    same but taste quite different. The Vidalias are the ones that are
    supposed to be mild and sweet, the regular yellows are much stronger.

  18. #18
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 08:34:09 -0500, "J. Clarke"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <fkx6p.14637$[email protected]> ,
    >[email protected] says...
    >>
    >> On 15/02/2011 1:10 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>
    >> >>
    >> >>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.
    >> >>
    >> >> I didn't.
    >> >
    >> > I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find that
    >> > is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought that
    >> > yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all. I
    >> > use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like the
    >> > stronger flavor better there.

    >>
    >> I always found red onions a little hard to handle myself. I have also
    >> found those big white onions to be a little harsh.

    >
    >
    >Don't confuse the yellow onion and the Vidalia onion. They look the
    >same but taste quite different. The Vidalias are the ones that are
    >supposed to be mild and sweet, the regular yellows are much stronger.



    Vidalia onions, 1015 onions and WAlla-Wallas grown in Washington state
    are all a variety named Granex. The differences in flavor come from
    the soil in which they are grown. I am growing some of them from seed
    and I don't really expect them to taste exactly like Vidalias or
    1015s. BTW Villas must be grown in Vidalia Georgia. 1015 name comes
    from the date on which they are planted in Texas.

    Since our winters are colder than south Georgia, I started mine in the
    greenhouse on 2/2. I will probably set mine out when the danger of
    frost is over.

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  19. #19
    john reeves Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar


    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ijc75e$6p8$[email protected]..
    >
    > "john reeves" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:ijb6ec$sr0$[email protected]..
    >> The japanese have a technique for chopping finely an onion, soaking it in
    >> water and then adding a little something (rice vinegar, i think); and it
    >> produces a pleasent mild tasting onion for adding to salads. It's
    >> actually so good and so mild that they do an onion salad which consists
    >> of 'just' onion prepared in this manner.
    >>
    >> I have tried to replicate this, but do not get the mild subtle taste that
    >> they do.
    >>
    >> Would anyone know *exactly* how they prepare this?
    >>
    >>

    > I've for years done the following.
    >
    > Prepare solution of 2TB salt, 2TB sugar, 3/4 cup vinegar, 1 cup water, and
    > spices. Do all of these ingredients to your taste.
    > Bring solution to very slight simmer. Put finely sliced yellow or white
    > onions in simmering water for a few minutes. Off heat, and chill.
    >
    > I usually store the onions immersed in the above solution diluted with
    > water to the degree of vinegar taste I want. White onions are milder than
    > yellow onions, as we all know.
    >
    > Kent

    ================================================== ====================================

    Thanks to all. Kent what type of spices would those be?



  20. #20
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Onion in water and vinegar

    In article <[email protected]>, susan_r23666
    @yahoo.com says...
    >
    > On Wed, 16 Feb 2011 08:34:09 -0500, "J. Clarke"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <fkx6p.14637$[email protected]> ,
    > >[email protected] says...
    > >>
    > >> On 15/02/2011 1:10 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >>> White onions are milder than yellow onions, as we all know.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I didn't.
    > >> >
    > >> > I read or heard somewhere that red onions are the sweetest. But I find that
    > >> > is not true at all. To me they are the most harsh. And I had thought that
    > >> > yellow were milder than white, but I now find that not to be true at all. I
    > >> > use white for most things. But I use yellow for pierogies. I just like the
    > >> > stronger flavor better there.
    > >>
    > >> I always found red onions a little hard to handle myself. I have also
    > >> found those big white onions to be a little harsh.

    > >
    > >
    > >Don't confuse the yellow onion and the Vidalia onion. They look the
    > >same but taste quite different. The Vidalias are the ones that are
    > >supposed to be mild and sweet, the regular yellows are much stronger.

    >
    >
    > Vidalia onions, 1015 onions and WAlla-Wallas grown in Washington state
    > are all a variety named Granex. The differences in flavor come from
    > the soil in which they are grown. I am growing some of them from seed
    > and I don't really expect them to taste exactly like Vidalias or
    > 1015s. BTW Villas must be grown in Vidalia Georgia. 1015 name comes
    > from the date on which they are planted in Texas.
    >
    > Since our winters are colder than south Georgia, I started mine in the
    > greenhouse on 2/2. I will probably set mine out when the danger of
    > frost is over.


    All true but it's diluting the point that they are different from the
    onions that are labelled "yellow onion".





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