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Thread: Olives too Saly? Osmosis to the rescue!

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Olives too Saly? Osmosis to the rescue!

    I bought an obnoxiously large jar of imported Greek Kalamata Olives at
    Restaurant Depot. 6.6 pounds worth. They were too strong of salt and
    vinegar. So what I've been doing is transferring them to a smaller
    jar - about 10 ounces at time, and replacing half the brine with
    distilled water. After 24 hours much of the salted water and some of
    the vinegar has been drawn out of the olives and replaced with
    unsalted water leaving me with highly edible olives.

    I leave the brine full strength in the jar as a preservative since
    this jar should last at least 2 years. And I'm only watering down the
    temporary jar's worth at a time.

    So next time you a get a fruit or veggie in brine - or even a meat
    like pickled sausage and it's too strong, let osmosis be your friend.

    This would make a good Schoolhouse Rock opera: "Osmosis Moses, what's
    your doses?". Or something like that.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Olives too Saly? Osmosis to the rescue!

    On Jul 10, 7:24*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > I bought an obnoxiously large jar of imported Greek Kalamata Olives at
    > Restaurant Depot. *6.6 pounds worth. *They were too strong of salt and
    > vinegar. *So what I've been doing is transferring them to a smaller
    > jar - about 10 ounces at time, and replacing half the brine with
    > distilled water. *After 24 hours much of the salted water and some of
    > the vinegar has been drawn out of the olives and replaced with
    > unsalted water leaving me with highly edible olives.
    >
    > I leave the brine full strength in the jar as a preservative since
    > this jar should last at least 2 years. *And I'm only watering down the
    > temporary jar's worth at a time.
    >
    > So next time you a get a fruit or veggie in brine - or even a meat
    > like pickled sausage and it's too strong, let osmosis be your friend.
    >
    > This would make a good Schoolhouse Rock opera: "Osmosis Moses, what's
    > your doses?". *Or something like that.
    >
    > -sw



    At the various mediterranean shops I've gone to there were always
    some that were saltier than others. I would take them home and use
    the water treatment same as you except I threw out all the brine. I'd
    let them soak for a day or so. Then I'd put some olive oil in there
    with some lemon juice and dried oregano and garlic sliced thinly. I
    love the olives when they're oily but not salty. Sometimes they'd
    actually have them at the store that way, covered with olive oil but
    not as salty. I don't eat olives as much as I once did because I'm
    missing 5 upper molars, 3 on one side, 2 on the other. I'm afraid I
    might get an olive between two teeth and squeeze down to remove the
    pit and wind up swallowing it as it jets out of the olive like a
    rocket into outer space. I love them on a plate with hummous and
    tabouli with some slightly toasted pita bread. What a great meatless
    meal that is. Creates great turds too, by the way.

    TJ

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Olives too Saly? Osmosis to the rescue!

    Steve wrote:

    > I bought an obnoxiously large jar of imported Greek Kalamata Olives at
    > Restaurant Depot. 6.6 pounds worth. They were too strong of salt and
    > vinegar. So what I've been doing is transferring them to a smaller
    > jar - about 10 ounces at time, and replacing half the brine with
    > distilled water. After 24 hours much of the salted water and some of
    > the vinegar has been drawn out of the olives and replaced with
    > unsalted water leaving me with highly edible olives.


    Sycophant has been doing that with green olives for years.


    > I leave the brine full strength in the jar as a preservative since
    > this jar should last at least 2 years. And I'm only watering down the
    > temporary jar's worth at a time.


    Try sealing some of that brine in a bag with a cleaned artichoke and then
    simmering it until the artichoke is tender.

    Bob




  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Olives too Saly? Osmosis to the rescue!

    On Fri, 15 Jul 2011 04:32:23 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > Steve wrote:
    >
    >> I bought an obnoxiously large jar of imported Greek Kalamata Olives at
    >> Restaurant Depot. 6.6 pounds worth. They were too strong of salt and
    >> vinegar. So what I've been doing is transferring them to a smaller
    >> jar - about 10 ounces at time, and replacing half the brine with
    >> distilled water. After 24 hours much of the salted water and some of
    >> the vinegar has been drawn out of the olives and replaced with
    >> unsalted water leaving me with highly edible olives.

    >
    > Sycophant has been doing that with green olives for years.


    Who cares. I only buy certain brands of green olives and they are
    fine as is. I don't buy **** olives.

    > Try sealing some of that brine in a bag with a cleaned artichoke and then
    > simmering it until the artichoke is tender.


    Can't stand artichokes except the Kirkland/Cara Mia marinated hearts.

    -sw

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