Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Oligosaccharide

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Oligosaccharide

    Yesterday, I was watching Cooking Time (wacky Korean
    language cooking show with English subtitles), and
    as usual the older lady was adding "oligosaccharide"
    to the food with the wild abandon normally reserved
    for tannis root. But this time was different because
    the young guy who is her co-host asked her why she
    was adding it, because they had already added sugar.
    That's a question I have been having all along.

    It was a fried fish dish, and she said it would help
    the fish hold together. This seemed almost a non-
    answer, because she uses it in a lot of stuff that
    doesn't have fish in it. She added it as a clear
    liquid that appeared a bit syrupy. I know quite a bit
    about food additives, and I don't know what this one is.
    "Oligosaccharide" only means a small number of linked
    sugar molecules. Technically, I suppose you could
    call sucrose an oligosaccharide, but it's usually
    called a disaccharide because it has only two simple
    sugar units. An oligosaccharide should have three or
    more, but beyond that I don't know what that stuff the
    Korean woman is using.

    Anyone familiar with the Korean oligosaccharide?

  2. #2
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    g.
    >
    > Anyone familiar with the Korean oligosaccharide?
    >



    Interesting read........

    http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/nut...saccharide.htm

    (Excerpt)

    Sandwiched in between the simple sugars (monosaccharides) and the starches
    (polysaccharides) are a group of carbohydrates that we never heard much
    about until recently, and most people still probably have no idea what
    they are. But if you read labels you might see ingredients like inulin and
    oligofructose on food packages – and probably will more and more. You
    also may have seen the word “prebiotic” creeping into the nutritional
    vocabulary.
    What is an Oligosaccharide?
    As we discussed in Part One, oligosaccharides are carbohydrates which have
    3-10 simple sugars linked together. They are found naturally, at least in
    small amounts, in many plants. Plants with large amounts of
    oligosaccharides include chicory root, from which most commercial inulin
    is extracted, and so-called Jerusalem artichokes (the root of a member of
    the sunflower family). They are also found in onions (and the rest of the
    "onion family", including leeks and garlic), legumes, wheat, asparagus,
    jicama, and other plant foods. It is estimated that North Americans get
    about 1-3 grams naturally in their diets each day, while Europeans get 3-
    10 grams.

    Most oligosaccarides have a mildly sweet taste, and have certain other
    characteristics, such as the mouthfeel they lend to food, that has drawn
    the interest of the food industry as a partial substitute for fats and
    sugars in some foods as well as improved texture. Because of this, more
    and more of the oligosaccharides in food are synthetically produced.

    Recent interest has also been drawn to oligosaccarides from the
    nutritional community because of an important characteristic: the human
    digestive system has a hard time breaking down many of these
    carbohydrates. Almost 90% escapes digestion in the small intestine and
    reaches the colon where it performs a different function: that of a
    prebiotic.

    What is a Prebiotic?
    Prebiotic is a kind of an odd term, fairly recently coined to refer to
    food components that support the growth of certain kinds of bacteria in
    the colon (large intestine). At first it was thought that oligosaccharides
    were the main prebiotics, but it turns out that resistant starch and
    fermentable fiber also feeds these bacteria. We’re learning now that a
    whole other digestive system is happening in the colon, with important
    influences on the rest of the body.

    What Are The Health Benefits of Prebiotics?

    ..........................



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  3. #3
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    Aussie <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > g.
    > >
    > > Anyone familiar with the Korean oligosaccharide?
    > >

    >
    >
    > Interesting read........
    >
    > http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/nut...saccharide.htm
    >
    > (Excerpt)
    >
    > Sandwiched in between the simple sugars (monosaccharides) and the starches
    > (polysaccharides) are a group of carbohydrates that we never heard much
    > about until recently, and most people still probably have no idea what
    > they are.


    My understanding is that these are what cause flatulence in people. As
    in beans and cabbage. If you take Beano, that provides an enzyme that
    breaks these down into simple sugars, so they don't cause flatulence.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > My understanding is that these are what cause flatulence in people. As
    > in beans and cabbage. If you take Beano, that provides an enzyme that
    > breaks these down into simple sugars, so they don't cause flatulence.


    I can certainly say nothing gives me gas
    worse than Jerusalem artichokes, which are
    rich in inulin. A funny fact is that the
    famed "psychic" Edgar Cayce recommended
    Jerusalem artichokes for diabetes claiming
    they contained insulin. Apparently, the
    entity he was channeling had a reading
    comprehension problem.

  5. #5
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    In article <4CA23E5A.68[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I can certainly say nothing gives me gas
    > worse than Jerusalem artichokes, which are
    > rich in inulin. A funny fact is that the
    > famed "psychic" Edgar Cayce recommended
    > Jerusalem artichokes for diabetes claiming
    > they contained insulin. Apparently, the
    > entity he was channeling had a reading
    > comprehension problem.


    Insulin is a protein. As such, it is digested like any other protein.
    There is no way to get insulin into your body orally. It must be
    injected. Many diabetics would be very happy if there was some way to
    get insulin in an oral form. It's not fun sticking a needle in yourself.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  6. #6
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Insulin is a protein. As such, it is digested like any other protein.
    > There is no way to get insulin into your body orally. It must be
    > injected. Many diabetics would be very happy if there was some way to
    > get insulin in an oral form. It's not fun sticking a needle in yourself.


    It is ultimately a problem of galenics to get insulin through the
    stomach undigested, to be then absorbed by the small intestine. No
    revolutionary developments are neccessary to solve this problem and it
    is just a question of time before oral administration becomes possible.

    Besides, there are other ways to administer insulin orally. Presently a
    new such drug is in the late stages of development. See, for example,
    <http://www.drugdevelopment-technology.com/projects/oral-lyn/>.

    Victor

  7. #7
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    On Sep 27, 5:15*pm, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > In article <Xns9E0144588B009Peterhomeinbris...@61.9.134.55> ,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > *Aussie <Aus...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus> wrote:
    > > Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote innews:[email protected]:

    >
    > > g.

    >
    > > > Anyone familiar with the Korean oligosaccharide?

    >
    > > Interesting read........

    >
    > >http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/nut...saccharide.htm

    >
    > > (Excerpt)

    >
    > > Sandwiched in between the simple sugars (monosaccharides) and the starches
    > > (polysaccharides) are a group of carbohydrates that we never heard much
    > > about until recently, and most people still probably have no idea what
    > > they are.

    >
    > My understanding is that these are what cause flatulence in people. *As
    > in beans and cabbage. *If you take Beano, that provides an enzyme that
    > breaks these down into simple sugars, so they don't cause flatulence.


    That is true. The reason that cooked onions are so farty is that
    onions contain certain oligosaccharides, but also the enzyme to break
    them down. Cooking denatures the enzyme, so they can't be digested
    until they get to the large intestine where bacteria break them down
    and eat them, giving off CO2.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel


    --Bryan

  8. #8
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide

    Dan Abel wrote:
    > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I can certainly say nothing gives me gas
    >> worse than Jerusalem artichokes, which are
    >> rich in inulin. A funny fact is that the
    >> famed "psychic" Edgar Cayce recommended
    >> Jerusalem artichokes for diabetes claiming
    >> they contained insulin. Apparently, the
    >> entity he was channeling had a reading
    >> comprehension problem.

    >
    > Insulin is a protein.


    Inulin is the type of dietary fiber common in fruits. One letter can
    make a very large difference in meaning.

  9. #9
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Oligosaccharide



    Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > Dan Abel wrote:
    > > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I can certainly say nothing gives me gas
    > >> worse than Jerusalem artichokes, which are
    > >> rich in inulin. A funny fact is that the
    > >> famed "psychic" Edgar Cayce recommended
    > >> Jerusalem artichokes for diabetes claiming
    > >> they contained insulin. Apparently, the
    > >> entity he was channeling had a reading
    > >> comprehension problem.

    > >
    > > Insulin is a protein.

    >
    > Inulin is the type of dietary fiber common in fruits. One letter can
    > make a very large difference in meaning.


    True enough.

    But insulin isn't a protein anyway. It's a peptide; only about 50 amino
    acids

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32