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Thread: Old stuff

  1. #1
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Old stuff

    What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?

    We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.

    I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted
    and we don't use it.

    There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things
    work really well, but we seldom use it.

    What's gathering dust in your kitchen?

    George L

  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    In article <[email protected]>,
    George Leppla <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >
    > I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted
    > and we don't use it.
    >
    > There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    > processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things
    > work really well, but we seldom use it.
    >
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?
    >
    > George L


    Muffin tins, cookie sheets and metal pie plates. I'm not a baker.
    The glass pie plates get used for various stuff.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    On Feb 27, 7:43*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >
    > I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted
    > and we don't use it.


    We have an aluminum roaster from my grandmother's set of the Canadian
    version of Guardian Service or Magnalite, et al. She gave it to my
    mother and now I have it. It is pretty badly pitted so we quit using
    it. At one time I researched the manufacturer -- they sold door-to-
    door -- but the information disappeared.

    I use a hand-cranked Universal meat grinder I got from a moving and
    storage company. And I have a 50's Mixmaster Jr. that doesn't develop
    much torque any more.

  4. #4
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    George Leppla wrote:
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.


    I have the VERY large cast aluminum oval stockpot my mother used to cook
    in when I was little. It's the largest cooking pot I own, and I do use
    it when I cook either a huge batch of spaghetti sauce, or a big
    casserole or turkey or something, but not super-often. It's got some
    splits in it, and it's heavy as hell, but I like it.

    Serene
    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Muffin tins, cookie sheets and metal pie plates. I'm not a baker.
    > The glass pie plates get used for various stuff.


    I often use the metal pie tins (from Baker's Square and the like) when I
    toast nuts for baking. Easy to shake them around.

    Glass pie plates are great for reheating a plate of food when I'm using
    my pottery plates at table.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Breaded Pork Tenderloin, 2-18-2010

  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Muffin tins, cookie sheets and metal pie plates. I'm not a baker.
    > > The glass pie plates get used for various stuff.

    >
    > I often use the metal pie tins (from Baker's Square and the like) when I
    > toast nuts for baking. Easy to shake them around.
    >
    > Glass pie plates are great for reheating a plate of food when I'm using
    > my pottery plates at table.


    I love the glass pie plates. :-)
    It's all these muffin tins I'm trying to get my sister to take!
    Those and the cookie sheets. I'll keep one insulated cookie sheet for
    pizza on the very rare occasion I make one. Ditto for biscuits for dad.

    The monster mixing bowls that mom used for bread are actually useful for
    other things.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  7. #7
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    On Feb 27, 7:43 am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    > [snip]
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?
    >

    I inherited a few things that are now more than fifty years old. A
    cast iron skillet that I use for fried chicken, cornbread, and
    occasionally as a comal/griddle as in heating tortillas or blistering/
    charring chiles/peppers. An Oster blender that I use rarely now that
    I have a stick blender. For margaritas, mostly. A GE hand mixer that
    I use even more rarely. Maybe if I made cakes more than once a
    year..... -aem

  8. #8
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff


    "George Leppla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hmbeki01[email protected]..
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >
    > I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted and
    > we don't use it.
    >
    > There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    > processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things work
    > really well, but we seldom use it.
    >
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?
    >
    > George L

    I have quite a few things that I inherited from my mother and over the years
    their usefulness is less as I found something better. But, I have an
    enormous stainless steel pan with 2 helper handles made by Vollrath that I
    can remember being used as my bath as a toddler. It is absolutely fabulous
    during canning season. It holds well over a bushel
    Janet



  9. #9
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 09:58:06 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > George Leppla <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >>
    >> We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >>
    >> I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted
    >> and we don't use it.
    >>
    >> There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    >> processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things
    >> work really well, but we seldom use it.
    >>
    >> What's gathering dust in your kitchen?
    >>
    >> George L

    >
    >Muffin tins, cookie sheets and metal pie plates. I'm not a baker.
    >The glass pie plates get used for various stuff.


    When we moved it was cut back time, and we gave away alot.
    It's amazing what you collect over 37yrs., there were some things I
    don't even remember buying that were parted out to new homes.

    I think the main things collecting dust now are the small sunbeam
    food processor (mainly because it's really small and was one of the
    first appliances we bought), and of course the corning wear (which I
    wouldn't part with). We BBQ alot now (even at -20C), and use the new
    toaster/convection oven Dan gave us for Xmas even more than was
    expected.

  10. #10
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    George Leppla wrote:
    >
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >
    > I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted
    > and we don't use it.
    >
    > There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    > processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things
    > work really well, but we seldom use it.
    >
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?
    >
    > George L


    Waffle maker (2 or 3 of them!!!! all gifts), that blooming onion slicer
    thingamajig, 2 cuisinart FPs, coffee maker (I do use an espresso machine
    however), pancake flip pan (another gift), electric skillet (cord's
    lost), and that "slap chop" gizmo (another gift). More than likely I've
    forgotten a few, too.

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  11. #11
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff


    "George Leppla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >
    > I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted and
    > we don't use it.
    >
    > There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    > processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things work
    > really well, but we seldom use it.
    >
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?
    >
    > George L


    I, personally, me, like to garage sale and buy "old stuff". I think my
    favorite things are:

    An old colander. Nice round base, big, and BakeLite handles
    A carving set with long knife, tine fork with tablecloth protector, and
    knife steel, all with stag handles.
    Bulletproof garlic press that one could put two pounds (nearly) of garlic
    into.
    Various metal mixing bowls.
    Those spatulas and spoons that are thick stainless steel that look like they
    came from the Army.
    The shiny round sugar holder that is all frilly with the red liner, cap, and
    spoon that used to sit on diner counters.

    I could go on and on.

    And some stuff just looks good sitting there, like the copper colander that
    just hangs on the pot rack.

    Steve



  12. #12
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    "George Leppla" wrote

    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?


    I've been freecycling off the old stuff we no longer use.

  13. #13
    Je├čus Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    George Leppla wrote:
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    >
    > We have my grandmother's cast iron Dutch Oven..... seldom use it.
    >
    > I also have an old cast iron fry pan that I inherited but it is pitted
    > and we don't use it.
    >
    > There is also a pretty old Salad Master... the fore-runner of the food
    > processor. (It Slices, dices and makes Julienne fries") These things
    > work really well, but we seldom use it.
    >
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?


    Not gathering dust as such - I use a lot of old stuff simply because
    they still work and/or haven't been bettered or no longer able to be
    bought new - such as the hand powered meat slicer - see no point in
    having an electric one really. I still use an old cast iron kettle for
    the combustion stove and also couple of iron skillets. The Electicaire
    dehydrator is also from the 1970's.



    --
    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism
    by those who haven't got it - George Bernard Shaw

  14. #14
    PickyJaz Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    On Feb 27, 7:43*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?

    Bless the heart of my younger son, he cleaned me out of any really old
    kitchen goodies. As a single, living on his own adult until he was
    about 32 he'd lived with other young men who had already established
    their kitchens. John (son) is the only caring cook among his group of
    friends, but he'd not set up his own kitchen until deciding at 30 that
    his life would be so much better living alone and away from the 24/7
    rowdies he grew up with. When trelling me he intended to move out of
    the home he shared with two others, I quickly appointed myself as the
    kitchen setter upper. What fun! I'm not positive, but I think it was
    BB&B that I went to for most everything I knew he's need, other than
    the complete set of Calphalon I'd already bought for both of our
    homes. I bought him a four of each piece set of white Corelle dishes
    in at least eight different shapes/sizes; a decent set of utensils for
    both tableware and cooking with; an inexpensive hand mixer along with
    glassware and coffee cups rounded things out for the kitchen. Them I
    hit my Brylane mail order catalog for all his linens: kitchen,
    bedroom and bath.

    BabyJohn drove out (we live two driving hours apart) to pack out his
    goodies (including a hand-down recliner and a natural wood four chair
    kitchen table set). The "extras" he had no trouble talking me out of
    were the 35 year old Osterizer blender that never leaked from the long
    side crack in it's glass container part; the toaster with swing down
    side racks that was my grandfather's and well over 50 years old; my
    small, very old hand crank meat grinder, and he decided that the Paint
    Pot absolutely had to become his. That pot was a heavy metal 16-
    quarter that he grew up with, watching it being used for everything
    from stews, soups and spaghetti, to steaming tamales. 'Twas so named
    the Paint Pot by his paternal grandmother who'd saved it's partially
    filled and paint speckled self from the back yard of a for-sale home
    she'd helped set up for showing with her girlfriend, the Realtor.
    Though I'd already gifted him with a good size set of Revereware two
    years before, then the huge Calphalon set, that brat also talked me
    out of the bigger, more complete set of Revereware that I'd inherited
    from my own paternal grandmother!

    My Gramma collected pretty little china plates for wall hangings, and
    several years before she died she had each of her 23 granchildren
    write their name on an adhesive tape to afix to the back of the plate
    they wanted handed down to them. I was the only child, then about ten
    years old and wanting nothing to do with ever working in a kitchen or
    learning to cook, who asked Gramma if I could have all her Revereware
    when she was to go on to next. The entire family was shocked, Gramma
    laughed, and the "order" was immediately noted by my Grandfather that
    I was to inherit all her pots and pans. They served me well for over
    30 years, John grew up learning to cook with them, and he has already
    picked out which of the small children in his life is to have the
    Revere set after he goes on.
    ....Picky

  15. #15
    critters & me in azusa, ca Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    On Feb 27, 3:55*pm, PickyJaz <Picky...@msn.com> wrote:
    > On Feb 27, 7:43*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:> What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?
    > > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?

    >
    > Bless the heart of my younger son, he cleaned me out of any really old
    > kitchen goodies. *As a single, living on his own adult until he was
    > about 32 he'd lived with other young men who had already established
    > their kitchens. *John (son) is the only caring cook among his group of
    > friends, but he'd not set up his own kitchen until deciding at 30 that
    > his life would be so much better living alone and away from the 24/7
    > rowdies he grew up with. *When trelling me he intended to move out of
    > the home he shared with two others, I quickly appointed myself as the
    > kitchen setter upper. *What fun! *I'm not positive, but I think it was
    > BB&B that I went to for most everything I knew he's need, other than
    > the complete set of Calphalon I'd already bought for both of our
    > homes. *I bought him a four of each piece set of white Corelle dishes
    > in at least eight different shapes/sizes; a decent set of utensils for
    > both tableware and cooking with; an inexpensive hand mixer along with
    > glassware and coffee cups rounded things out for the kitchen. *Them I
    > hit my Brylane mail order catalog for all his linens: *kitchen,
    > bedroom and bath.
    >
    > BabyJohn drove out (we live two driving hours apart) to pack out his
    > goodies (including a hand-down recliner and a natural wood four chair
    > kitchen table set). *The "extras" he had no trouble talking me out of
    > were the 35 year old Osterizer blender that never leaked from the long
    > side crack in it's glass container part; the toaster with swing down
    > side racks that was my grandfather's and well over 50 years old; my
    > small, very old hand crank meat grinder, and he decided that the Paint
    > Pot absolutely had to become his. *That pot was a heavy metal 16-
    > quarter that he grew up with, watching it being used for everything
    > from stews, soups and spaghetti, to steaming tamales. * 'Twas so named
    > the Paint Pot by his paternal grandmother who'd saved it's partially
    > filled and paint speckled self from the back yard of a for-sale home
    > she'd helped set up for showing with her girlfriend, the Realtor.
    > Though I'd already gifted him with a good size set of Revereware two
    > years before, then the huge Calphalon set, that brat also talked me
    > out of the bigger, more complete set of Revereware that I'd inherited
    > from my own paternal grandmother!
    >
    > My Gramma collected pretty little china plates for wall hangings, and
    > several years before she died she had each of her 23 granchildren
    > write their name on an adhesive tape to afix to the back of the plate
    > they wanted handed down to them. *I was the only child, then about ten
    > years old and wanting nothing to do with ever working in a kitchen or
    > learning to cook, who asked Gramma if I could have all her Revereware
    > when she was to go on to next. *The entire family was shocked, Gramma
    > laughed, and the "order" was immediately noted by my Grandfather that
    > I was to inherit all her pots and pans. *They served me well for over
    > 30 years, John grew up learning to cook with them, and he has already
    > picked out which of the small children in his life is to have the
    > Revere set after he goes on.
    > ...Picky


    From my step mother, I have an ice cream scoop with a patten date of
    1904 on it. It is made out of steel & the moving parts have big
    cotter pins holding it together. I also have an iron egg beater with
    a date of 1904 on it, and finally my favorite bread knife in the
    world...it is stamped "The Burns Bread Knife, Stainless Steel, Pat
    8-23-21, The Burns Mfg Co., Syracuse, NY, USA".

    Harriet & critters in rainy Azusa

  16. #16
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 10:40:07 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Muffin tins, cookie sheets and metal pie plates. I'm not a baker.
    >> The glass pie plates get used for various stuff.

    >
    >I often use the metal pie tins (from Baker's Square and the like) when I
    >toast nuts for baking. Easy to shake them around.
    >
    >Glass pie plates are great for reheating a plate of food when I'm using
    >my pottery plates at table.


    I use a metal pie tin (from Marie Callendar's) to cool the custard for
    cream pies. Cools faster.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Stu <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When we moved it was cut back time, and we gave away alot.
    > It's amazing what you collect over 37yrs., there were some things I
    > don't even remember buying that were parted out to new homes.
    >
    > I think the main things collecting dust now are the small sunbeam
    > food processor (mainly because it's really small and was one of the
    > first appliances we bought), and of course the corning wear (which I
    > wouldn't part with). We BBQ alot now (even at -20C), and use the new
    > toaster/convection oven Dan gave us for Xmas even more than was
    > expected.


    I plan to go thru stuff with my sister once I can "kidnap" her for a
    day.<g> I'll treat her to lunch then make her go thru the cabinets and
    pantry with me.

    I know she currently lacks storage space as I live in a house and she
    lives in a apt., but I'll happily store what she actually wants and
    freecycle the rest...

    I'm tired of having too much crap from 3 generations of dead people.
    <sigh>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sky <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Waffle maker (2 or 3 of them!!!! all gifts), that blooming onion slicer
    > thingamajig, 2 cuisinart FPs, coffee maker (I do use an espresso machine
    > however), pancake flip pan (another gift), electric skillet (cord's
    > lost), and that "slap chop" gizmo (another gift). More than likely I've
    > forgotten a few, too.
    >
    > Sky


    Freecycle is your friend. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  19. #19
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    George Leppla <[email protected]>
    news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > What's gathering dust in your kitchen?


    An old Sunbeam juicer. I'd say it's circa '70s. A pressure cooker I
    bought a year or so ago that I've never used. Quite a few pieces of cast
    iron that we've had for Gawd knows how long. An extra crock pot, still in
    the box, never used, won at a raffle years ago. A spiffy electric can
    opener, never used. Lots of storage containers that are never used but must
    be kept in case they are needed.

    Michael

    --
    "Like all great divas, I owe everything to the kindness of gay men."
    ~Margaret Cho

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  20. #20
    sandi Guest

    Default Re: Old stuff

    George Leppla <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > What old kitchen stuff do you have... and do you use it?


    Lot's of old utensils.

    I use this hand mixer often.

    Looks like this:
    http://coinsandmoreonline.com/images...andMixer-1923-
    Good.jpg

    Also old graters.
    Like this one.
    http://images.goantiques.com/thumbna...NC9739GR09.jpg

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