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Thread: Ok this is food related.. a question

  1. #1
    Stu Guest

    Default Ok this is food related.. a question


    Ok this is food related...

    A friend asked me what would the difference be if a recipe called for
    1 tsp. of baking soda, and all she had was baking powder. Would it
    ruin her recipe if she used baking powder?
    Now if I remember correctly from my HE classes, some recipes that
    bake longer could use baking powder in place of baking soda, am I
    correct or full of ****?

    You do realize that was a rhetorical question ;o)


    --
    Stu

    URL: http://foodforu.ca -- Email: [email protected]
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  2. #2
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Ok this is food related.. a question

    On Thu, 27 May 2010 11:47:52 -0500, Stu wrote:

    > Ok this is food related...
    >
    > A friend asked me what would the difference be if a recipe called for 1
    > tsp. of baking soda, and all she had was baking powder. Would it ruin
    > her recipe if she used baking powder? Now if I remember correctly from
    > my HE classes, some recipes that bake longer could use baking powder in
    > place of baking soda, am I correct or full of ****?
    >
    > You do realize that was a rhetorical question ;o)


    From about.com
    Question: How Do I Substitute Between Baking Powder and Baking Soda?
    Baking powder and baking soda both are leavening agents, which means they
    help baked goods to rise. They are not the same chemical, but you can
    substitute one for another in recipes. Here's how.
    Answer: Using Baking Powder Instead of Baking Soda

    * You need to use 2-3 times more baking powder than baking soda. The
    extra ingredients in the baking powder will have an effect on the taste
    of whatever you are making, but this isn't necessarily bad.

    * Ideally, triple the amount of baking powder to equal the amount of
    baking soda. So, if the recipe called for 1 tsp baking soda, you would
    use 3 tsp baking powder.

    * What I do is compromise... I use twice the amount of baking powder
    as baking soda (add 2 tsp of baking powder if the recipe calls for 1 tsp
    baking soda), plus I omit the salt (which adds flavor but also affects
    rising in some recipes).

    Making Baking Powder

    * You need baking soda and cream of tartar to make baking powder.

    * Mix 2 parts cream of tartar with 1 part baking soda. For example,
    mix 2 tsp cream of tartar with 1 tsp baking soda.

    * Use the amount of baking powder called for by the recipe. No matter
    how much homemade baking powder you made, if the recipe calls for 1-1/2
    tsp, add exactly 1-1/2 tsp of your mixture.

    Cream of tartar is used to increase the acidity of a mixture. So, you
    can't always use baking soda in recipes that call for baking powder. You
    can switch baking powder for baking soda, however, just expect the flavor
    to change a little.




    --
    ´╗┐regards, piedmont ~ the practical bbq'r!

    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/

  3. #3
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Ok this is food related.. a question

    On Thu, 27 May 2010 17:13:59 +0000 (UTC), piedmont <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 27 May 2010 11:47:52 -0500, Stu wrote:
    >
    >> Ok this is food related...
    >>
    >> A friend asked me what would the difference be if a recipe called for 1
    >> tsp. of baking soda, and all she had was baking powder. Would it ruin
    >> her recipe if she used baking powder? Now if I remember correctly from
    >> my HE classes, some recipes that bake longer could use baking powder in
    >> place of baking soda, am I correct or full of ****?
    >>
    >> You do realize that was a rhetorical question ;o)

    >
    >From about.com
    >Question: How Do I Substitute Between Baking Powder and Baking Soda?
    >Baking powder and baking soda both are leavening agents, which means they
    >help baked goods to rise. They are not the same chemical, but you can
    >substitute one for another in recipes. Here's how.
    >Answer: Using Baking Powder Instead of Baking Soda
    >
    > * You need to use 2-3 times more baking powder than baking soda. The
    >extra ingredients in the baking powder will have an effect on the taste
    >of whatever you are making, but this isn't necessarily bad.
    >
    > * Ideally, triple the amount of baking powder to equal the amount of
    >baking soda. So, if the recipe called for 1 tsp baking soda, you would
    >use 3 tsp baking powder.
    >
    > * What I do is compromise... I use twice the amount of baking powder
    >as baking soda (add 2 tsp of baking powder if the recipe calls for 1 tsp
    >baking soda), plus I omit the salt (which adds flavor but also affects
    >rising in some recipes).
    >
    >Making Baking Powder
    >
    > * You need baking soda and cream of tartar to make baking powder.
    >
    > * Mix 2 parts cream of tartar with 1 part baking soda. For example,
    >mix 2 tsp cream of tartar with 1 tsp baking soda.
    >
    > * Use the amount of baking powder called for by the recipe. No matter
    >how much homemade baking powder you made, if the recipe calls for 1-1/2
    >tsp, add exactly 1-1/2 tsp of your mixture.
    >
    >Cream of tartar is used to increase the acidity of a mixture. So, you
    >can't always use baking soda in recipes that call for baking powder. You
    >can switch baking powder for baking soda, however, just expect the flavor
    >to change a little.


    Thank you

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