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Thread: OK, Eggses it is.

  1. #1
    Chemiker Guest

    Default OK, Eggses it is.

    You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.

    ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.

    They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    5 eggs!

    Anybody ever done these?

    Alex, curious.

    As SWMBO is in WVa, I think I will make
    some apple wontons. A snack. Used a Buitoni
    coupon for chicken/prosciutto ravioli, which I
    will serve with something red. Sauce, that is.
    (And NO, I will not serve the apple wontons with
    the pasta.)

    Maybe a tomato sauce with black olives and
    basil, tempered with Asiago.

    Yup, that's it. That's din-din tonight.

    Alex

  2. #2
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    Chemiker wrote:

    > You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >
    > ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >
    > They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    > anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    > 5 eggs!
    >
    > Anybody ever done these?
    >
    > Alex, curious.



    Yep. Years ago I saw a pic and couldn't resist making them and putting
    them out for a party.

    They sure looked cool, and they made for a great conversation piece.
    Nobody was bowled over by the eating though, and I've never made them
    since.

  3. #3
    aem Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Jul 28, 12:10*pm, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >
    > ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >
    > They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    > anise, 1/4 cup good dark *soy, some salt,
    > 5 eggs!
    >
    > Anybody ever done these?
    > [snip]


    Yes, I've done them a few times for a picnic novelty. I remember the
    five spice and the tea, don't remember using star anise but it seems
    suitable. I've read that in the old days they were thought of as
    "train food" because vendors at train stations sold them. Don't know
    if that's still true. -aem

  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue 28 Jul 2009 12:25:23p, RegForte told us...

    > Chemiker wrote:
    >
    >> You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >>
    >> ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >>
    >> They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    >> anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt, 5 eggs!
    >>
    >> Anybody ever done these?
    >>
    >> Alex, curious.

    >
    >
    > Yep. Years ago I saw a pic and couldn't resist making them and putting
    > them out for a party.
    >
    > They sure looked cool, and they made for a great conversation piece.
    > Nobody was bowled over by the eating though, and I've never made them
    > since.
    >


    I can't imagine much flavor penetrating the eggshell. After the cooking,
    I'd be tempted to peel them and let them steep in the liquid (or a fresh
    batch of it), as one would do pickled eggs. The flavors should easily
    penetrate the egg white.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Vegetables are interesting but lack a sense of purpose when
    unaccompanied by a good cut of meat. Fran Lebowitz




  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    Wayne wrote about tea eggs:

    > I can't imagine much flavor penetrating the eggshell. After the cooking,
    > I'd be tempted to peel them and let them steep in the liquid (or a fresh
    > batch of it), as one would do pickled eggs. The flavors should easily
    > penetrate the egg white.


    The flavors don't penetrate the shell: The eggs are hard-boiled, then
    cracked all over before being cooked in the flavored tea. The tea can get
    through the membrane underneath the shell to the egg inside. After cooking
    and peeling, you end up with prettily-marbled and delicately-flavored eggs.

    Bob




  6. #6
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.



    Chemiker wrote:
    > You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >
    > ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.


    Ever do curried eggs?

    12 eggs
    salt and curry powder
    1/2 cup clarified butter
    4 large onions
    2 tbs. curry powder
    1 tbs. salt
    2 cups boiling water
    1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper

    Hard boil the eggs and remove shells. Prick them generously all over
    with a fork, then roll in a little curry powder and salt.

    Heat the butter and cook the eggs in it for 5 minutes, turning
    frequently - they must not burn. Remove from pan.

    Slice the onions and cook half of them in the sam pan until golden. Add
    curry powder, cook 5 minutes, then stir in half the water.

    After 3 minutes, return eggs to pan and add remaining water and onions
    and alt. Cover the pan and simmer gently for an hour. Just before
    serving sprinkle on the pepper.

    Serve with rice, bhurtas, papadums & any condiments desired.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  7. #7
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    RegForte wrote:
    >
    > Yep. Years ago I saw a pic and couldn't resist making them and putting
    > them out for a party.
    >
    > They sure looked cool, and they made for a great conversation piece.
    > Nobody was bowled over by the eating though, and I've never made them
    > since.


    When I was a teenager, my mom made tea eggs.
    I think she saw an article in a magazine
    which described how to make them.

    They did look pretty, but when you get right
    down to it, they're just hardboiled eggs.
    I don't remember her ever making them a
    second time.

  8. #8
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 14:10:47 -0500, Chemiker
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You guys have tempted me t

    o do something with eggs.
    >
    >ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >
    >They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    >anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    >5 eggs!


    Well, damn my eyes! My pups love these things.
    My first try was not too pretty, but tasty they were.
    There *was* a slight green ring, but they were
    not rubbery as SWMBO had predicted. They were
    tender after simmering an hour in the tea/infusion.

    All they required was a bit of salt and all was well.

    Some once told me old eggs are better than new.

    Alex, getting ready to start the ravioli.

  9. #9
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Chemiker <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >
    > ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >
    > They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    > anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    > 5 eggs!
    >
    > Anybody ever done these?


    I've thought about it. Pastorio posted about these at one point and they
    do look interesting.

    >
    > Alex, curious.
    >
    > As SWMBO is in WVa, I think I will make
    > some apple wontons. A snack. Used a Buitoni
    > coupon for chicken/prosciutto ravioli, which I
    > will serve with something red. Sauce, that is.
    > (And NO, I will not serve the apple wontons with
    > the pasta.)
    >
    > Maybe a tomato sauce with black olives and
    > basil, tempered with Asiago.
    >
    > Yup, that's it. That's din-din tonight.
    >
    > Alex


    Sounds wonderful. I really need to try to get a pot of basil growing.
    Fresh Basil is so good, but so expensive to purchase!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > RegForte wrote:
    > >
    > > Yep. Years ago I saw a pic and couldn't resist making them and putting
    > > them out for a party.
    > >
    > > They sure looked cool, and they made for a great conversation piece.
    > > Nobody was bowled over by the eating though, and I've never made them
    > > since.

    >
    > When I was a teenager, my mom made tea eggs.
    > I think she saw an article in a magazine
    > which described how to make them.
    >
    > They did look pretty, but when you get right
    > down to it, they're just hardboiled eggs.
    > I don't remember her ever making them a
    > second time.


    I'd probably do them and then make deviled eggs out of them just for the
    color interest.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  11. #11
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue 28 Jul 2009 02:01:09p, Bob Terwilliger told us...

    > Wayne wrote about tea eggs:
    >
    >> I can't imagine much flavor penetrating the eggshell. After the cooking,
    >> I'd be tempted to peel them and let them steep in the liquid (or a fresh
    >> batch of it), as one would do pickled eggs. The flavors should easily
    >> penetrate the egg white.

    >
    > The flavors don't penetrate the shell: The eggs are hard-boiled, then
    > cracked all over before being cooked in the flavored tea. The tea can get
    > through the membrane underneath the shell to the egg inside. After cooking
    > and peeling, you end up with prettily-marbled and delicately-flavored eggs.
    >
    > Bob


    Thanks, Bob. I didn't know the process.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    At the end of every diet, the path curves back toward the trough.
    Mason Cooley




  12. #12
    Peter Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    Arri London <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    >
    >
    > Chemiker wrote:
    >>
    >> You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >>
    >> ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >>
    >> They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    >> anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    >> 5 eggs!
    >>
    >> Anybody ever done these?
    >>
    >> Alex, curious.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Do them all the time. But where is the tea in your recipe? Supposed to
    > have black tea in there too...



    I haven' done 'tea' eggs, but I have a batch of Om's pickled eggs with
    beetroot juice in the fridge going great guns at the moment.

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    If we are not meant to eat animals,
    why are they made of meat?

  13. #13
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.



    Chemiker wrote:
    >
    > You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >
    > ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >
    > They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    > anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    > 5 eggs!
    >
    > Anybody ever done these?
    >
    > Alex, curious.
    >
    >


    Do them all the time. But where is the tea in your recipe? Supposed to
    have black tea in there too...

  14. #14
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.



    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    > On Tue 28 Jul 2009 12:25:23p, RegForte told us...
    >
    > > Chemiker wrote:
    > >
    > >> You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    > >>
    > >> ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    > >>
    > >> They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    > >> anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt, 5 eggs!
    > >>
    > >> Anybody ever done these?
    > >>
    > >> Alex, curious.

    > >
    > >
    > > Yep. Years ago I saw a pic and couldn't resist making them and putting
    > > them out for a party.
    > >
    > > They sure looked cool, and they made for a great conversation piece.
    > > Nobody was bowled over by the eating though, and I've never made them
    > > since.
    > >

    >
    > I can't imagine much flavor penetrating the eggshell. After the cooking,
    > I'd be tempted to peel them and let them steep in the liquid (or a fresh
    > batch of it), as one would do pickled eggs. The flavors should easily
    > penetrate the egg white.
    >


    The shells need to be *thoroughly* cracked. Then after heating for a
    couple of hours, they need to cool in the cooking liquid. Plenty of
    flavour penetrates through the cracks.

  15. #15
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.



    "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq." wrote:
    >
    > Chemiker wrote:
    > > You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    > >
    > > ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.

    >
    > Ever do curried eggs?


    Have done that with curry paste. Never done your way thoughn with
    powder. Could be good.


    >
    > 12 eggs
    > salt and curry powder
    > 1/2 cup clarified butter
    > 4 large onions
    > 2 tbs. curry powder
    > 1 tbs. salt
    > 2 cups boiling water
    > 1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper
    >
    > Hard boil the eggs and remove shells. Prick them generously all over
    > with a fork, then roll in a little curry powder and salt.
    >
    > Heat the butter and cook the eggs in it for 5 minutes, turning
    > frequently - they must not burn. Remove from pan.
    >
    > Slice the onions and cook half of them in the sam pan until golden. Add
    > curry powder, cook 5 minutes, then stir in half the water.
    >
    > After 3 minutes, return eggs to pan and add remaining water and onions
    > and alt. Cover the pan and simmer gently for an hour. Just before
    > serving sprinkle on the pepper.
    >
    > Serve with rice, bhurtas, papadums & any condiments desired.
    > --
    >
    > Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.
    >
    > Domine, dirige nos.
    > Let the games begin!
    > http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  16. #16
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 14:10:47 -0500, Chemiker
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >
    >ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >
    >They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    >anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt,
    >5 eggs!
    >
    >Anybody ever done these?
    >
    >Alex, curious.
    >


    OK, I have to go along with the consensus. They were OK,
    a sort of inoffensive snack, and I like eggs anyway. BUT:
    Now I wonder if this technique could be extended to other
    flavors, to infuse the egg whites with something prior to
    making eggs casino (devilled eggs). I don't know.... parsley?
    Mint? Start anise adds a licorice flavor. That would work with
    ouzo/raki, in a meze table. Pernod? Paychaud's bitters? Lemon?
    Lime? Orange? Hmmm... vinaigrette

    Alex, going to have an applejack and then sleep on it.

  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue 28 Jul 2009 07:47:23p, Arri London told us...

    >
    >
    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>
    >> On Tue 28 Jul 2009 12:25:23p, RegForte told us...
    >>
    >> > Chemiker wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> You guys have tempted me to do something with eggs.
    >> >>
    >> >> ok, I'm going to do tea eggs.
    >> >>
    >> >> They are cooking now; 2 tsp 5-spice, 2 Star
    >> >> anise, 1/4 cup good dark soy, some salt, 5 eggs!
    >> >>
    >> >> Anybody ever done these?
    >> >>
    >> >> Alex, curious.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Yep. Years ago I saw a pic and couldn't resist making them and putting
    >> > them out for a party.
    >> >
    >> > They sure looked cool, and they made for a great conversation piece.
    >> > Nobody was bowled over by the eating though, and I've never made them
    >> > since.
    >> >

    >>
    >> I can't imagine much flavor penetrating the eggshell. After the

    cooking,
    >> I'd be tempted to peel them and let them steep in the liquid (or a fresh
    >> batch of it), as one would do pickled eggs. The flavors should easily
    >> penetrate the egg white.
    >>

    >
    > The shells need to be *thoroughly* cracked. Then after heating for a
    > couple of hours, they need to cool in the cooking liquid. Plenty of
    > flavour penetrates through the cracks.
    >


    Thanks, Arrri!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money. Plus, if you let
    fruit rot, it turns into wine, something Brussels sprouts never do.
    P.J. O'Rourke




  18. #18
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    Chemiker wrote:
    >
    > OK, I have to go along with the consensus. They were OK,
    > a sort of inoffensive snack, and I like eggs anyway. BUT:
    > Now I wonder if this technique could be extended to other
    > flavors, to infuse the egg whites with something prior to
    > making eggs casino (devilled eggs). I don't know.... parsley?
    > Mint? Start anise adds a licorice flavor. That would work with
    > ouzo/raki, in a meze table. Pernod? Paychaud's bitters? Lemon?
    > Lime? Orange? Hmmm... vinaigrette


    Habanero pepper sauce.

  19. #19
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 20:45:58 -0600, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Chemiker wrote:


    >Do them all the time. But where is the tea in your recipe? Supposed to
    >have black tea in there too...


    My oversight. I threw 4 teabags of standard orange/black pekoe in the
    pot. THEN the soy, etc.

    I noticed you can't smack the eggs up too much, or you get xs seepage
    into the interior, which, with soy, makes a nasty brown mess.
    Otherwise, the marbled finish is as usually pictured. It reminds me of
    the marmorius cone shell (C. marmoreus) I think that spelling is
    wrong.

    Alex

  20. #20
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: OK, Eggses it is.

    On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 20:35:19 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Chemiker wrote:
    >>
    >> OK, I have to go along with the consensus. They were OK,
    >> a sort of inoffensive snack, and I like eggs anyway. BUT:
    >> Now I wonder if this technique could be extended to other
    >> flavors, to infuse the egg whites with something prior to
    >> making eggs casino (devilled eggs). I don't know.... parsley?
    >> Mint? Start anise adds a licorice flavor. That would work with
    >> ouzo/raki, in a meze table. Pernod? Paychaud's bitters? Lemon?
    >> Lime? Orange? Hmmm... vinaigrette

    >
    >Habanero pepper sauce.


    I like your creative thinking, Mark. Since I can't see simmering the
    eggs in Habanero sauce, I have to imagine Habanero sauce in a
    water/vinegar base, maybe with lime..... Have to think about it.

    But I like your idea.

    Alex

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