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Thread: O/T: Clothes Lines

  1. #1
    Lew Hodgett Guest

    Default O/T: Clothes Lines

    As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    smell of clothes from the dryer.

    Enjoy

    Lew
    -----------------------------------------
    Are there any out there who still know what a clothes line is?????????

    Remember?

    You have to be a certain age to appreciate this.
    I can hear my mother now......

    THE BASIC RULES FOR CLOTHESLINES:

    (If you don't know what clotheslines are, better skip this)


    1. You had to wash the clothes line before hanging any clothes - walk
    the

    entire lengths of each line with a damp
    cloth around the lines.

    2. You had to hang the clothes in a certain order, and always hang

    "whites" with "whites," and hang them first.

    3. You never hung a shirt by the shoulders - always by the tail!.
    What

    would the neighbors think?

    4. Wash day on a Monday! . .. . Never hang clothes on the weekend, or

    Sunday, for Heaven's sake!

    5. Hang the sheets and towels on the outside lines so you could hide

    your "unmentionables" in the middle (perverts & busybodies, y'know!)

    6. It didn't matter if it was sub zero weather ... clothes would

    "freeze-dry."

    7. Always gather the clothes pins when taking down dry clothes! Pins

    left on the lines were "tacky!"

    8. If you were efficient, you would line the clothes up so that each
    item

    did not need two clothes pins, but shared
    one of the clothes pins with the next washed item.

    9. Clothes off of the line before dinner time, neatly folded in the
    clothes

    basket, and ready to be ironed.

    10. IRONED?! Well, that's a whole other subject!


    A POEM

    A clothesline was a news forecast
    To neighbors passing by,

    There no secrets you could keep
    When clothes were hung to dry.

    It also was a friendly link
    For neighbors always knew

    If company had stopped on by
    To spend a night or two.

    For then you'd see the "fancy sheets"
    And towels upon the line;

    You'd see the "company table cloths"
    With intricate designs.

    The line announced a baby's birth
    From folks who lived inside -

    As brand new infant clothes were hung,
    So carefully with pride!

    The ages of the children could
    So readily be known

    By watching how the sizes changed,
    You'd know how much they'd grown!

    It also told when illness struck,
    As extra sheets were hung;

    Then nightclothes, and a bathrobe, too,
    Haphazardly were strung.

    It also said, "Gone on vacation now"
    When lines hung limp and bare.

    It told, "We're back!" when full lines sagged
    With not an inch to spare!

    New folks in town were scorned upon
    If wash was dingy and gray,

    As neighbors carefully raised their brows,
    And looked the other way .. .

    But clotheslines now are of the past,
    For dryers make work much less.

    Now what goes on inside a home
    Is anybody's guess!

    I really miss that way of life.
    It was a friendly sign.

    When neighbors knew each other best,
    By what hung on the line.




  2. #2
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.
    >
    > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    > smell of clothes from the dryer.
    >
    > Enjoy
    >
    > Lew
    > -----------------------------------------
    > Are there any out there who still know what a clothes line is?????????
    >
    > Remember?
    >
    > You have to be a certain age to appreciate this.
    > I can hear my mother now......
    >
    > THE BASIC RULES FOR CLOTHESLINES:
    >
    > (If you don't know what clotheslines are, better skip this)
    >
    > 1. *You had to wash the clothes line before hanging any clothes - walk
    > the
    >
    > entire lengths of each line with a damp
    > cloth around the lines.
    >
    > 2. *You had to hang the clothes in a certain order, and always hang
    >
    > "whites" with "whites," and hang them first.
    >
    > 3. *You never hung a shirt by the shoulders *- always by the tail!.
    > What
    >
    > would the neighbors think?
    >
    > 4. *Wash day on a Monday! . .. . Never hang clothes on the weekend, or
    >
    > Sunday, for Heaven's sake!
    >
    > 5. *Hang the sheets and towels on the outside lines so you could hide
    >
    > your "unmentionables" in the middle (perverts & busybodies, y'know!)
    >
    > 6. * It didn't matter if it was sub zero weather *... clothes would
    >
    > "freeze-dry."
    >
    > 7. *Always gather the clothes pins when taking down dry clothes! *Pins
    >
    > left on the lines were "tacky!"
    >
    > 8. *If you were efficient, you would line the clothes up so that each
    > item
    >
    > did not need two clothes pins, but shared
    > one of the clothes pins with the next washed item.
    >
    > 9. *Clothes off of the line before dinner time, neatly folded in the
    > clothes
    >
    > basket, and ready to be ironed.
    >
    > 10. IRONED?! *Well, that's a whole other subject!
    >
    > A *POEM
    >
    > A clothesline was a news forecast
    > To neighbors passing by,
    >
    > There no secrets you could keep
    > When clothes were hung to dry.
    >
    > It also was a friendly link
    > For neighbors always knew
    >
    > If company had stopped on by
    > To spend a night or two.
    >
    > For then you'd see the "fancy sheets"
    > And towels upon the line;
    >
    > You'd see the "company table cloths"
    > With intricate designs.
    >
    > The line announced a baby's birth
    > From folks who lived inside -
    >
    > As brand new infant clothes were hung,
    > So carefully with pride!
    >
    > The ages of the children could
    > So readily be known
    >
    > By watching how the sizes changed,
    > You'd know how much they'd grown!
    >
    > It also told when illness struck,
    > As extra sheets were hung;
    >
    > Then nightclothes, and a bathrobe, too,
    > Haphazardly were strung.
    >
    > It also said, "Gone on vacation now"
    > When lines hung limp and bare.
    >
    > It told, "We're back!" when full lines sagged
    > With not an inch to spare!
    >
    > New folks in town were scorned upon
    > If wash was dingy and gray,
    >
    > As neighbors carefully raised their brows,
    > And looked the other way .. .
    >
    > But clotheslines now are of the past,
    > For dryers make work much less.
    >
    > Now what goes on inside a home
    > Is anybody's guess!
    >
    > I really miss that way of life.
    > It was a friendly sign.
    >
    > When neighbors knew each other best,
    > By what hung on the line.


    I liked using the clothes PROP as a javelin!

    John Kuthe...

  3. #3
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >
    > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >
    > > Enjoy

    >
    > > Lew
    > > -----------------------------------------
    > > Are there any out there who still know what a clothes line is?????????

    >
    > > Remember?

    >
    > > You have to be a certain age to appreciate this.
    > > I can hear my mother now......

    >
    > > THE BASIC RULES FOR CLOTHESLINES:

    >
    > > (If you don't know what clotheslines are, better skip this)

    >
    > > 1. *You had to wash the clothes line before hanging any clothes - walk
    > > the

    >
    > > entire lengths of each line with a damp
    > > cloth around the lines.

    >
    > > 2. *You had to hang the clothes in a certain order, and always hang

    >
    > > "whites" with "whites," and hang them first.

    >
    > > 3. *You never hung a shirt by the shoulders *- always by the tail!.
    > > What

    >
    > > would the neighbors think?

    >
    > > 4. *Wash day on a Monday! . .. . Never hang clothes on the weekend, or

    >
    > > Sunday, for Heaven's sake!

    >
    > > 5. *Hang the sheets and towels on the outside lines so you could hide

    >
    > > your "unmentionables" in the middle (perverts & busybodies, y'know!)

    >
    > > 6. * It didn't matter if it was sub zero weather *... clothes would

    >
    > > "freeze-dry."

    >
    > > 7. *Always gather the clothes pins when taking down dry clothes! *Pins

    >
    > > left on the lines were "tacky!"

    >
    > > 8. *If you were efficient, you would line the clothes up so that each
    > > item

    >
    > > did not need two clothes pins, but shared
    > > one of the clothes pins with the next washed item.

    >
    > > 9. *Clothes off of the line before dinner time, neatly folded in the
    > > clothes

    >
    > > basket, and ready to be ironed.

    >
    > > 10. IRONED?! *Well, that's a whole other subject!

    >
    > > A *POEM

    >
    > > A clothesline was a news forecast
    > > To neighbors passing by,

    >
    > > There no secrets you could keep
    > > When clothes were hung to dry.

    >
    > > It also was a friendly link
    > > For neighbors always knew

    >
    > > If company had stopped on by
    > > To spend a night or two.

    >
    > > For then you'd see the "fancy sheets"
    > > And towels upon the line;

    >
    > > You'd see the "company table cloths"
    > > With intricate designs.

    >
    > > The line announced a baby's birth
    > > From folks who lived inside -

    >
    > > As brand new infant clothes were hung,
    > > So carefully with pride!

    >
    > > The ages of the children could
    > > So readily be known

    >
    > > By watching how the sizes changed,
    > > You'd know how much they'd grown!

    >
    > > It also told when illness struck,
    > > As extra sheets were hung;

    >
    > > Then nightclothes, and a bathrobe, too,
    > > Haphazardly were strung.

    >
    > > It also said, "Gone on vacation now"
    > > When lines hung limp and bare.

    >
    > > It told, "We're back!" when full lines sagged
    > > With not an inch to spare!

    >
    > > New folks in town were scorned upon
    > > If wash was dingy and gray,

    >
    > > As neighbors carefully raised their brows,
    > > And looked the other way .. .

    >
    > > But clotheslines now are of the past,
    > > For dryers make work much less.

    >
    > > Now what goes on inside a home
    > > Is anybody's guess!

    >
    > > I really miss that way of life.
    > > It was a friendly sign.

    >
    > > When neighbors knew each other best,
    > > By what hung on the line.

    >
    > I liked using the clothes PROP as a javelin!


    I'd like to see state laws that guarantee the right to use a
    clothesline. Laws that trump local ordinances and condo association
    rules.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    --Bryan

  4. #4
    itsjoannotjoann Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 12, 10:01*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >
    > > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >
    > > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    > > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >
    > > > Enjoy

    >
    >

    Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. I used mine today to hang out
    sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. Clothes pins left on
    the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    items. But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    again in April.

  5. #5
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 12, 11:06*pm, itsjoannotjoann <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net>
    wrote:
    > On May 12, 10:01*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >
    > > > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >
    > > > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    > > > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >
    > > > > Enjoy

    >
    > Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. *I used mine today to hang out
    > sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. *Clothes pins left on
    > the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    > items. *But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    > again in April.


    In many places they are against the rules.

    --Bryan

  6. #6
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On Wed, 12 May 2010 21:34:26 -0700 (PDT), Food SnobŪ
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On May 12, 11:06*pm, itsjoannotjoann <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net>
    >wrote:
    >> On May 12, 10:01*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >>
    >> > > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >>
    >> > > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >>
    >> > > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    >> > > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >>
    >> > > > Enjoy

    >>
    >> Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. *I used mine today to hang out
    >> sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. *Clothes pins left on
    >> the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    >> items. *But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    >> again in April.

    >
    >In many places they are against the rules.
    >


    White trash have clothelines in front.

  7. #7
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 7:23*am, brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Wed, 12 May 2010 21:34:26 -0700 (PDT), Food SnobŪ
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >On May 12, 11:06*pm, itsjoannotjoann <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net>
    > >wrote:
    > >> On May 12, 10:01*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> > On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> > > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> > > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >
    > >> > > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't likethe
    > >> > > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >
    > >> > > > Enjoy

    >
    > >> Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. *I used mine today to hang out
    > >> sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. *Clothes pins left on
    > >> the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    > >> items. *But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    > >> again in April.

    >
    > >In many places they are against the rules.

    >
    > White trash have clothelines in front.


    You know why White trash put old appliances in their front yards? So
    that everyone who drives by can see that they have gotten *new*
    appliances.

    --Bryan

  8. #8
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    itsjoannotjoann wrote:

    >On May 12, 10:01*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >>
    >> > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >>
    >> > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    >> > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >>
    >> > > Enjoy

    >>
    >>

    >Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. I used mine today to hang out
    >sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. Clothes pins left on
    >the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    >items. But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    >again in April.


    I have a clothesline in my basement, for foul weather drying of items
    that can't go in the clothes dryer, car drying towels, etc. Outdoor
    drying doesn't work well where I live, too many birds and birds rather
    perch on clotheslines than anywhere else.

  9. #9
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Support Right to Dry laws (was: Clothes Lines)

    On May 12, 11:06*pm, itsjoannotjoann <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net>
    wrote:
    > On May 12, 10:01*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 12, 9:49*pm, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >
    > > > > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.

    >
    > > > > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    > > > > smell of clothes from the dryer.

    >
    > > > > Enjoy

    >
    > Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. *I used mine today to hang out
    > sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. *Clothes pins left on
    > the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    > items. *But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    > again in April.


    Right to Dry:
    http://www.cga.ct.gov/2008/rpt/2008-R-0042.htm

    --Bryan

  10. #10
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 12, 10:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:

    <snipped>

    Here's what I think of clotheslines:

    1. I have better things to do than stand around pinning up clothes
    2. I prefer my clothes to be soft, smell like the dryer, and not
    require
    ironing
    3. I prefer not to have bird**** on my freshly washed clothes

    You can keep your nostalgia.

    Cindy Hamilton

  11. #11
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 7:32*am, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    [tangential deletiopn]
    > You know why White trash put old appliances in their front yards? *So
    > that everyone who drives by can see that they have gotten *new*
    > appliances.


    HEY!! I used to have old cars and old appliances in my front yard! And
    our mobile home was at the end of a dead end road!!

    Oh, that's right, I guess we WERE White Trash! Hee hee! :-)

    John Kuthe...



  12. #12
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 8:27*am, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 13, 7:32*am, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > [tangential deletiopn]
    >
    > > You know why White trash put old appliances in their front yards? *So
    > > that everyone who drives by can see that they have gotten *new*
    > > appliances.

    >
    > HEY!! I used to have old cars and old appliances in my front yard! And
    > our mobile home was at the end of a dead end road!!
    >
    > Oh, that's right, I guess we WERE White Trash! Hee hee! :-)


    A mobile home on top of a mountain, at the end of a gravel road, with
    ferrets running around your trailer. Um, I'm at a loss to find a way
    to disagree.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    --Bryan

  13. #13
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 8:49*am, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 13, 8:27*am, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > On May 13, 7:32*am, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > [tangential deletiopn]

    >
    > > > You know why White trash put old appliances in their front yards? *So
    > > > that everyone who drives by can see that they have gotten *new*
    > > > appliances.

    >
    > > HEY!! I used to have old cars and old appliances in my front yard! And
    > > our mobile home was at the end of a dead end road!!

    >
    > > Oh, that's right, I guess we WERE White Trash! Hee hee! :-)

    >
    > A mobile home on top of a mountain, at the end of a gravel road, with
    > ferrets running around your trailer. *Um, I'm at a loss to find a way
    > to disagree.


    Hey! They lived in a cage!

    Now the FLEA problem was another thing! Ick! I can't believe we lived
    like that! I guess the sex was just too good. ;-)

    John Kuthe...

  14. #14
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 12, 9:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > As a kid, I still remember wiping the clothes lines for my mother.
    >
    > She still hung her clothes on a clothes line at 102. Didn't like the
    > smell of clothes from the dryer.
    >
    > Enjoy
    >
    > Lew
    > -----------------------------------------
    > Are there any out there who still know what a clothes line is?????????
    >
    > Remember?



    I like clotheslines - for other people. Sometimes I borrow my
    neighbor's if I have rugs, etc. to hang up. But I prefer soft clothes
    from the dryer. Outdoor lines (parallel ones with a big metal T-post
    at each end) do make me remember my childhood on the farm - those were
    good times.

    N.

  15. #15
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 8:54*am, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 13, 8:49*am, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 13, 8:27*am, John Kuthe <johnku...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On May 13, 7:32*am, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > > [tangential deletiopn]

    >
    > > > > You know why White trash put old appliances in their front yards? *So
    > > > > that everyone who drives by can see that they have gotten *new*
    > > > > appliances.

    >
    > > > HEY!! I used to have old cars and old appliances in my front yard! And
    > > > our mobile home was at the end of a dead end road!!

    >
    > > > Oh, that's right, I guess we WERE White Trash! Hee hee! :-)

    >
    > > A mobile home on top of a mountain, at the end of a gravel road, with
    > > ferrets running around your trailer. *Um, I'm at a loss to find a way
    > > to disagree.

    >
    > Hey! They lived in a cage!
    >
    > Now the FLEA problem was another thing! Ick! I can't believe we lived
    > like that! I guess the sex was just too good. ;-)


    I never knew you involved the ferrets!!!!! That's just sick.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    --Bryan

  16. #16
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    Cindy Hamilton wrote:

    >On May 12, 10:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    >Here's what I think of clotheslines:
    >
    >1. I have better things to do than stand around pinning up clothes
    >2. I prefer my clothes to be soft, smell like the dryer, and not
    >require
    >ironing
    >3. I prefer not to have bird**** on my freshly washed clothes
    >
    >You can keep your nostalgia.


    Agreed... and there are much better ways to save electric than not
    using the clothes dryer... like not owning an electric stove/oven, and
    then using it to bake one potato, plus all the lights folks forget to
    turn off when they leave a room... and many folks don't use their
    dryer efficiently, they overload it and dry only on high heat... you
    will save energy and extend their life by removing heavier items
    before completely dry and hang them; comforters, blankets, winter
    outerwear, floor mats, etc... that's why I have lines in my basement.
    And the UV from sunlight deteriorates fibers, fades colors, and
    destroys elastic... cuts the life of your laundry by at least half...
    and I detest linty clothes. And yoose ladies shouldn't be machine
    drying your expensive delicates... machine dry on low for five
    minutes to remove wrinkles and lint, then hang them somewhere, they
    don't take much room and they dry fast. I still own one of those
    wooden clothes drying racks that stood in the bathtub, from many years
    ago, before I had my own house.

  17. #17
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 9:24*am, Cindy Hamilton <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    > On May 12, 10:38*pm, "Lew Hodgett" <sails.m...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    > <snipped>
    >
    > Here's what I think of clotheslines:
    >
    > 1. *I have better things to do than stand around pinning up clothes
    > 2. *I prefer my clothes to be soft, smell like the dryer, and not
    > require
    > ironing
    > 3. *I prefer not to have bird**** on my freshly washed clothes


    > You can keep your nostalgia.
    >
    > Cindy Hamilton


    I'm with you. I had to deal with a ringer washer and clotheslines on
    pulleys as a kid. In the winter, bring in those towels which were
    frozen boards and let em dry on a rack after 3 days of waiting for a
    thaw. And bring em in before it rains. And NEVER have laundry still
    on the line on a Sunday. I know all about it. My mother knew the
    lore.

    And I DON'T care for the fresh cotton smell, Yankee candles be
    damned.

    As to my electricity usage, I'd rather give up a night or two of the
    drivel on tv than stop using my dryer. I had enuf of clothesline
    drying. I DO keep a folding rack tho, to dry delicate sheer curtains
    etc on a nice day out on the deck.

    I lived in a place where clotheslines were frowned upon, as well as
    trucks, rvs and boats in the driveway. I can understand it - some ppl
    would leave laundry on the line for days and it looked like the devil.

  18. #18
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    On May 13, 10:20*am, brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:

    *I still own one of those
    > wooden clothes drying racks that stood in the bathtub, from many years
    > ago, before I had my own house.


    My wooden rack is always standing in my bathtub which is never used
    for a bath. I use the rack to dry damp towels and handwashing.

  19. #19
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Food_SnobŪ <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > On May 12, 11:06*pm, itsjoannotjoann <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net>


    > > Ummmmmm, I still use a clothes line. *I used mine today to hang out
    > > sheets and yes, I have a clothes pin bag, too. *Clothes pins left on
    > > the line get dirty and transfer that dirt to your freshly washed
    > > items. *But I usually stop using it sometime in November and start up
    > > again in April.


    > In many places they are against the rules.


    So much for "land of the free" :-)

    I use a clothesline as much as possible, winter and summer. There is
    nothing like the smell and feel of clothes and bedlinen
    dried in the fresh breeze and sunshine.

    Back in the 60's my landlady dried her washing in the yard which was
    the entry to our flat. She always hung out her ancient husband's
    enormous underwear in weird contorted shapes so that it wouldn't make
    us young ladies think about male anatomy.

    Janet

  20. #20
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: O/T: Clothes Lines

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On May 13, 9:24 am, Cindy Hamilton <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com>
    > wrote:


    >> Here's what I think of clotheslines:
    >>
    >> 1. I have better things to do than stand around pinning up clothes
    >> 2. I prefer my clothes to be soft, smell like the dryer, and not
    >> require
    >> ironing
    >> 3. I prefer not to have bird**** on my freshly washed clothes

    >
    >> You can keep your nostalgia.


    > I'm with you. I had to deal with a ringer washer and clotheslines on
    > pulleys as a kid. In the winter, bring in those towels which were
    > frozen boards and let em dry on a rack after 3 days of waiting for a
    > thaw. And bring em in before it rains. And NEVER have laundry still
    > on the line on a Sunday. I know all about it. My mother knew the
    > lore.


    Ah, people after my own heart. I have NO fond memories of
    line drying, the weather never cooperated when it was important
    and I'll be happy to spend the rest of my life not dealing with
    frozen towels that dry to a nice scratchy texture.

    I have a dowel held up by a couple of loops of rope in my
    utility room, I hang up whatever I don't care to put into the
    dryer for whatever reason.

    > I lived in a place where clotheslines were frowned upon, as well as
    > trucks, rvs and boats in the driveway. I can understand it - some ppl
    > would leave laundry on the line for days and it looked like the devil.


    I'm not nostalgic for the underwear-on-display look, either. I know
    that's not a popular sentiment in these here parts. Heh.

    nancy

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