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Thread: O.k., never saw this offered before

  1. #1
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default O.k., never saw this offered before

    I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    be why the following variety meats were for sale.

    Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds

    The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    gut?

    Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    what that's about.

    Janet US

  2. #2
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    > be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >
    > Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    > Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    > Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >
    > The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    > something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    > gut?


    Beef cheek meat is supreme stewing meat.

    Beef feet can be used for the same purposes as veal or pork feet (pig
    trotters), but they need longer cooking. For example, they can be used
    for a headcheese-like dishes, such as the Russian "studen'" (in which
    beef feet are traditional, as distinct from the Ukrainian "kholodets"
    made with pig trotters).

    Marrow gut is milk-fed calf's chitterlings. Ideally, they are uncleaned
    and contain the partially digested milk. There is an old and famous
    Roman dish, pasta (particularly rigatoni) con la pagliata/pajata, which
    I mentioned before. The chitterlings (intestines) are braided, i.e.
    tied at intervals, to form "rounds", so they do not lose their contents
    during cooking. They are then cooked with oil, _lardo_ and soffritto,
    and then with some wine and tomato purée for a couple of hours. They
    are served over rigatoni and sprinkled with pecorino. Apparently, each
    serving traditionally contains two such "rounds".

    > Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    > what that's about.


    You can cook trippa alla romana, if you want to remain in that region...
    or menudo, if you do not...

    Victor


  3. #3
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On Mon, 16 May 2011 23:35:01 +0200, [email protected] (Victor Sack)
    wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    >> be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >>
    >> Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    >> Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    >> Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >>
    >> The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    >> something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    >> gut?

    >
    >Beef cheek meat is supreme stewing meat.
    >
    >Beef feet can be used for the same purposes as veal or pork feet (pig
    >trotters), but they need longer cooking. For example, they can be used
    >for a headcheese-like dishes, such as the Russian "studen'" (in which
    >beef feet are traditional, as distinct from the Ukrainian "kholodets"
    >made with pig trotters).
    >
    >Marrow gut is milk-fed calf's chitterlings. Ideally, they are uncleaned
    >and contain the partially digested milk. There is an old and famous
    >Roman dish, pasta (particularly rigatoni) con la pagliata/pajata, which
    >I mentioned before. The chitterlings (intestines) are braided, i.e.
    >tied at intervals, to form "rounds", so they do not lose their contents
    >during cooking. They are then cooked with oil, _lardo_ and soffritto,
    >and then with some wine and tomato purée for a couple of hours. They
    >are served over rigatoni and sprinkled with pecorino. Apparently, each
    >serving traditionally contains two such "rounds".
    >
    >> Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    >> what that's about.

    >
    >You can cook trippa alla romana, if you want to remain in that region...
    >or menudo, if you do not...
    >
    >Victor


    Thanks Victor. Obviously these items are outside my culinary
    ethnicity. My understanding is that most cheek meat is outstanding
    for flavor. Is this true in your experience? I think I'll give a
    pass on the feet and gut.
    Janet US

  4. #4
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    > I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    > be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >
    > Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    >
    > What do you do with beef feet ...


    Rendered slowly for their gelatin. I'd rather have the factory process
    it and buy the powder. But I like pickled pigs feet so in principle it
    could be pickled like that and eaten after a year on the shelf settling
    in the pickling liquid.


  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    > be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >
    > Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    > Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    > Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >
    > The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    > something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    > gut?
    >
    > Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    > what that's about.
    >
    > Janet US


    I saw cheeks on the menu when I was in New York City last year.
    Since then, I have noticed it a few more times. I regret not
    having it. I can't say I have seen marrow gut or cut feet either
    in a shop or a restaurant.

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    critters & me in azusa, ca Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On May 16, 1:42*pm, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > I went to Cash and Carry today. *May is National Beef Month. *That may
    > be why the following variety meats were for sale. *
    >
    > Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    > Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    > Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >
    > The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    > something of. *What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    > gut?
    >
    > Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    > what that's about.
    >
    > Janet US


    The beef feet (pata) are used along with beef honeycomb tripe as a
    basis for menudo, which when made correctly is wonderful.

    Harriet & critters

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    > be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >
    > Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    > Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    > Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >
    > The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    > something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    > gut?
    >
    > Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    > what that's about.
    >
    > Janet US


    Beef feet can be used in Menudo but Nicaraguan or Colombian Mondongo is
    more common.

    Calves foot jelly tho' is the only thing I've ever made from them and
    dad loves it, and it's supposed to be a very nutritious and beneficial
    meal for the elderly. Here is a pic series from the first time I made
    it:

    <https://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet/CalvesFootAspic#>

    A rather complex recipe but really not that hard to make. Once cut up
    and in the pot, calves feet look just like any other beef soup bone.
    Discard the hoof section if you are that squeamish. <g> They are very,
    very high in collagen just like pigs or chickens feet so make a very
    nutritious stock that is supposed to be beneficial for joint issues as
    the collagen is broken down by the (normally) long cooking process. I
    cheat and use a pressure cooker, but even THAT takes 75 minutes to get
    it all to dissolve! I end up adding water back to the pot once I open
    it to get it back to my original volume with the pot 3/4 full.

    As for unbraided marrow? I've no idea but I'll likely google it. I love
    marrow cooked and spread on crackers. ;-d

    I want to try tripe some day but have not yet worked up the nerve. <g>
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <hg73[email protected]>,
    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks Victor. Obviously these items are outside my culinary
    > ethnicity. My understanding is that most cheek meat is outstanding
    > for flavor. Is this true in your experience? I think I'll give a
    > pass on the feet and gut.
    > Janet US


    I'm not Victor but Beef cheek meat is called Barbacoa around here and is
    widely used for making breakfast tacos. The taqueria at the end of my
    street only serves it on Saturdays. ;-) My brother in law usually hits
    that stand on weekends just so he can get some. There is another series
    in my picasa albums using beef cheek meat to make tacos. It really is a
    wonderful meat and the price has gone up, much to our sorrow. <sighs>
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  9. #9
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On Mon, 16 May 2011 21:37:35 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    >> be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >>
    >> Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    >> Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    >> Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >>
    >> The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    >> something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    >> gut?
    >>
    >> Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    >> what that's about.
    >>
    >> Janet US

    >
    >Beef feet can be used in Menudo but Nicaraguan or Colombian Mondongo is
    >more common.
    >
    >Calves foot jelly tho' is the only thing I've ever made from them and
    >dad loves it, and it's supposed to be a very nutritious and beneficial
    >meal for the elderly. Here is a pic series from the first time I made
    >it:
    >
    ><https://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet/CalvesFootAspic#>
    >
    >A rather complex recipe but really not that hard to make. Once cut up
    >and in the pot, calves feet look just like any other beef soup bone.
    >Discard the hoof section if you are that squeamish. <g> They are very,
    >very high in collagen just like pigs or chickens feet so make a very
    >nutritious stock that is supposed to be beneficial for joint issues as
    >the collagen is broken down by the (normally) long cooking process. I
    >cheat and use a pressure cooker, but even THAT takes 75 minutes to get
    >it all to dissolve! I end up adding water back to the pot once I open
    >it to get it back to my original volume with the pot 3/4 full.
    >
    >As for unbraided marrow? I've no idea but I'll likely google it. I love
    >marrow cooked and spread on crackers. ;-d
    >
    >I want to try tripe some day but have not yet worked up the nerve. <g>


    That calves foot jelly looks really very good. I know you've talked
    about it before, but it isn't anything like I imagined it to be. It
    looks an ambitious project.
    Thanks for the pics.
    Janet US

  10. #10
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On Mon, 16 May 2011 19:12:56 -0700 (PDT), "critters & me in azusa, ca"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On May 16, 1:42*pm, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >> I went to Cash and Carry today. *May is National Beef Month. *That may
    >> be why the following variety meats were for sale. *
    >>
    >> Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    >> Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    >> Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    >>
    >> The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    >> something of. *What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    >> gut?
    >>
    >> Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    >> what that's about.
    >>
    >> Janet US

    >
    >The beef feet (pata) are used along with beef honeycomb tripe as a
    >basis for menudo, which when made correctly is wonderful.
    >
    >Harriet & critters

    I would have to try someone else's menudo before I tried it myself. I
    have no sense of the dish at all. Thanks for helping me understand.
    Janet US

  11. #11
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On Mon, 16 May 2011 22:05:17 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>
    >> I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    >> be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    >>
    >> Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    >>
    >> What do you do with beef feet ...

    >
    >Rendered slowly for their gelatin. I'd rather have the factory process
    >it and buy the powder. But I like pickled pigs feet so in principle it
    >could be pickled like that and eaten after a year on the shelf settling
    >in the pickling liquid.


    I like pickled pigs feet but not so much that I would try to make them
    myself. I haven't had them in years and years. I'm sure you've just
    planted a craving in my head.
    Janet US

  12. #12
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On Mon, 16 May 2011 21:41:29 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks Victor. Obviously these items are outside my culinary
    >> ethnicity. My understanding is that most cheek meat is outstanding
    >> for flavor. Is this true in your experience? I think I'll give a
    >> pass on the feet and gut.
    >> Janet US

    >
    >I'm not Victor but Beef cheek meat is called Barbacoa around here and is
    >widely used for making breakfast tacos. The taqueria at the end of my
    >street only serves it on Saturdays. ;-) My brother in law usually hits
    >that stand on weekends just so he can get some. There is another series
    >in my picasa albums using beef cheek meat to make tacos. It really is a
    >wonderful meat and the price has gone up, much to our sorrow. <sighs>


    O.k., that's it. I'm going for the beef cheeks. Between thoughts of
    stew and Barbacoa I have a serious need to cook. Thanks for the
    insight
    Janet US

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Calves foot jelly tho' is the only thing I've ever made from them and
    > >dad loves it, and it's supposed to be a very nutritious and beneficial
    > >meal for the elderly. Here is a pic series from the first time I made
    > >it:
    > >
    > ><https://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet/CalvesFootAspic#>
    > >
    > >A rather complex recipe but really not that hard to make. Once cut up
    > >and in the pot, calves feet look just like any other beef soup bone.
    > >Discard the hoof section if you are that squeamish. <g> They are very,
    > >very high in collagen just like pigs or chickens feet so make a very
    > >nutritious stock that is supposed to be beneficial for joint issues as
    > >the collagen is broken down by the (normally) long cooking process. I
    > >cheat and use a pressure cooker, but even THAT takes 75 minutes to get
    > >it all to dissolve! I end up adding water back to the pot once I open
    > >it to get it back to my original volume with the pot 3/4 full.
    > >

    >
    > That calves foot jelly looks really very good. I know you've talked
    > about it before, but it isn't anything like I imagined it to be. It
    > looks an ambitious project.
    > Thanks for the pics.
    > Janet US


    It is actually kind of fun. :-) You are most welcome and thanks for
    looking!
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 16 May 2011 21:41:29 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Thanks Victor. Obviously these items are outside my culinary
    > >> ethnicity. My understanding is that most cheek meat is outstanding
    > >> for flavor. Is this true in your experience? I think I'll give a
    > >> pass on the feet and gut.
    > >> Janet US

    > >
    > >I'm not Victor but Beef cheek meat is called Barbacoa around here and is
    > >widely used for making breakfast tacos. The taqueria at the end of my
    > >street only serves it on Saturdays. ;-) My brother in law usually hits
    > >that stand on weekends just so he can get some. There is another series
    > >in my picasa albums using beef cheek meat to make tacos. It really is a
    > >wonderful meat and the price has gone up, much to our sorrow. <sighs>

    >
    > O.k., that's it. I'm going for the beef cheeks. Between thoughts of
    > stew and Barbacoa I have a serious need to cook. Thanks for the
    > insight
    > Janet US


    Have fun and let us know what happens? :-)
    A lot of that white streaking is collagen, not fat so there won't be too
    much to skim if you stew it.

    Good luck!
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  15. #15
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I went to Cash and Carry today. May is National Beef Month. That may
    > > be why the following variety meats were for sale.
    > >
    > > Marrow Gut - unbraided $23.90 for 30 pounds
    > > Beef Cut Feet $8.90 for 10 pounds
    > > Beef Cheek Meat $19.80 for 10 pounds
    > >
    > > The beef cheek meat is the only thing that I could figure out making
    > > something of. What do you do with beef feet and unbraided? marrow
    > > gut?
    > >
    > > Oh, they also had Honeycomb Tripe $12.99 for 10 pounds, but I know
    > > what that's about.
    > >
    > > Janet US

    >
    > Beef feet can be used in Menudo but Nicaraguan or Colombian Mondongo is
    > more common.
    >
    > Calves foot jelly tho' is the only thing I've ever made from them and
    > dad loves it, and it's supposed to be a very nutritious and beneficial
    > meal for the elderly. Here is a pic series from the first time I made
    > it:
    >
    > <https://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet/CalvesFootAspic#>
    >
    > A rather complex recipe but really not that hard to make.


    That was REALLY interesting, thanks for posting it.
    >
    > I want to try tripe some day but have not yet worked up the nerve. <g>


    Tripe is a regional trad dish in north England where I was born; like
    calves foot jelly, believed to be very nutritious for children and
    invalids. My mother loved it (so did my sister) so cooked it often. I
    absolutely loathed it (mostly the texture/mouthfeel as it's pretty bland)
    .. However, when I had children my (dead) mother's voice was continually in
    my ear so I cooked it for them. They all hated it too :-)

    Janet UK

  16. #16
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Mon, 16 May 2011 21:41:29 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Thanks Victor. Obviously these items are outside my culinary
    > >> ethnicity. My understanding is that most cheek meat is outstanding
    > >> for flavor. Is this true in your experience? I think I'll give a
    > >> pass on the feet and gut.
    > >> Janet US

    > >
    > >I'm not Victor but Beef cheek meat is called Barbacoa around here and is
    > >widely used for making breakfast tacos. The taqueria at the end of my
    > >street only serves it on Saturdays. ;-) My brother in law usually hits
    > >that stand on weekends just so he can get some. There is another series
    > >in my picasa albums using beef cheek meat to make tacos. It really is a
    > >wonderful meat and the price has gone up, much to our sorrow. <sighs>

    >
    > O.k., that's it. I'm going for the beef cheeks. Between thoughts of
    > stew and Barbacoa I have a serious need to cook. Thanks for the
    > insight
    > Janet US


    I bought some beef cheek last year (had to order it specially from the
    butcher) and casseroled it with onions and carrots. It's delicious and
    very tender; also probably the cheapest cut of beef.
    Janet

  17. #17
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    On Tue, 17 May 2011 11:05:18 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    snip
    >
    > Tripe is a regional trad dish in north England where I was born; like
    >calves foot jelly, believed to be very nutritious for children and
    >invalids. My mother loved it (so did my sister) so cooked it often. I
    >absolutely loathed it (mostly the texture/mouthfeel as it's pretty bland)
    >. However, when I had children my (dead) mother's voice was continually in
    >my ear so I cooked it for them. They all hated it too :-)
    >
    > Janet UK


    Tradition has been well served! ;o)
    Janet US

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Beef feet can be used in Menudo but Nicaraguan or Colombian Mondongo is
    > > more common.
    > >
    > > Calves foot jelly tho' is the only thing I've ever made from them and
    > > dad loves it, and it's supposed to be a very nutritious and beneficial
    > > meal for the elderly. Here is a pic series from the first time I made
    > > it:
    > >
    > > <https://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet/CalvesFootAspic#>
    > >
    > > A rather complex recipe but really not that hard to make.

    >
    > That was REALLY interesting, thanks for posting it.


    Most welcome! :-) It's been awhile since I've made it and probably
    about time. Dad's been on a fish kick tho' but I BBQ'd yesterday for
    the first time this spring.

    > >
    > > I want to try tripe some day but have not yet worked up the nerve. <g>

    >
    > Tripe is a regional trad dish in north England where I was born; like
    > calves foot jelly, believed to be very nutritious for children and
    > invalids. My mother loved it (so did my sister) so cooked it often. I
    > absolutely loathed it (mostly the texture/mouthfeel as it's pretty bland)
    > . However, when I had children my (dead) mother's voice was continually in
    > my ear so I cooked it for them. They all hated it too :-)
    >
    > Janet UK


    <lol> Not everyone enjoys the gelatinous texture that high collagen
    foods produce. :-) I personally love it so I suspect I'll enjoy tripe
    once I work up to trying it. Funny too because I adore chicken feet:

    <https://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet/ChickenFootStock110509#>

    Chicken foot stock is the one stock I use only powdered spices in. I
    don't want to have to pick around the discard veggies to munch the feet.
    I grew up eating these and adore the darned things (duck feet too) and
    they make one of the richest stocks I've ever made. Supposed to be
    really good for colds. The stock that is. <g> If you can't stomach
    eating the feet themselves, the bones cook down soft enough to feed them
    to the dogs and just use the liquid.
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  19. #19
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > I'm not Victor but Beef cheek meat is called Barbacoa around here ...


    I thought babacoa is a cooking method that works with any long fiber
    beef? Maybe that's a regional variation in Mexican recipes.

  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: O.k., never saw this offered before

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > On Mon, 16 May 2011 21:41:29 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> Thanks Victor. Obviously these items are outside my culinary
    > > >> ethnicity. My understanding is that most cheek meat is outstanding
    > > >> for flavor. Is this true in your experience? I think I'll give a
    > > >> pass on the feet and gut.
    > > >> Janet US
    > > >
    > > >I'm not Victor but Beef cheek meat is called Barbacoa around here and is
    > > >widely used for making breakfast tacos. The taqueria at the end of my
    > > >street only serves it on Saturdays. ;-) My brother in law usually hits
    > > >that stand on weekends just so he can get some. There is another series
    > > >in my picasa albums using beef cheek meat to make tacos. It really is a
    > > >wonderful meat and the price has gone up, much to our sorrow. <sighs>

    > >
    > > O.k., that's it. I'm going for the beef cheeks. Between thoughts of
    > > stew and Barbacoa I have a serious need to cook. Thanks for the
    > > insight
    > > Janet US

    >
    > I bought some beef cheek last year (had to order it specially from the
    > butcher) and casseroled it with onions and carrots. It's delicious and
    > very tender; also probably the cheapest cut of beef.
    > Janet


    <sniffles> It's not cheap around here. :-( Too popular! Never tried it
    as just a stew meat. Will have to do so if I can hit it on sale.
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

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