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Thread: NYC subway/train and alcohol

  1. #1
    Somebody Guest

    Default NYC subway/train and alcohol

    I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were openly drinking in
    public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started... I
    was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one of
    the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as much
    as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when they
    get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)




  2. #2
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:23:52 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    >to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were openly drinking in
    >public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started... I
    >was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one of
    >the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as much
    >as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    >the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when they
    >get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)
    >
    >

    It is illegal to drink alcohol in public places in NYC such as you
    describe. It is strictly prohibited by law.

    Do the cops spend all their time enforcing these laws when they see
    them violated? Not always, and you can see folks keeping a beer can
    hidden in a paper bag and sipping their brew on street corners in some
    areas at some times. Still, a NYC transit cop will slap the ass of an
    obvious drinker pretty damn quickly.

    The commuter lines, the MTA and LIRR, however, are different and some
    trains have bar cars. And terminals and some stations have restaurants
    and bars.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...546475484.html

    Nevertheless, flaunting it in line at Colbert will bring the wrath of
    their wranglers down on ticket holders should it be seen openly. Both
    Colbert and Stewart shows are not particularly pleasant for ticket
    holders in my estimation. I haven't been to either in a year or so,
    but one of my kids is going next week, so I'll see if there is a
    change.

    Alcoholic beverages are major advertisers on both shows, though.

    Boron

  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was really surprised how many people were drinking when
    > waiting in line
    > to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were
    > openly drinking in public on the sidewalk and kinda
    > drunkish by the time the show started... I was also
    > surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I
    > asked one of the train attendants about it, and he said:
    > "oh yeah, you can drink as much as you want and get
    > hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in the
    > station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive
    > home when they get to their station? Isn't there liability
    > issues?)




    If you live in NYC, the subway system can usually get you blocks
    from your apartment building. On the other hand if you take the
    subway to catch a commuter train to the burbs getting hammered
    is definitely a bad idea.

    On a day trip to NYC, I studied the subway system for a couple
    weeks plotting subway connections. With the $2 day passes,
    getting around the Big Apple fast and trouble free!!!

    We split a pitcher of beer for lunch, a cocktail at the fountain
    at Lincoln center, then dinner at the Stage Deli, then subwayed
    to Grand Central Terminal to look around and had a cocktail at
    the mezzanine bar. Subwayed to Penn station andAmtrak'd back to
    Philly. Regional railed to my town clean and sober for the drive
    home.

    Thanks to the subway system we saw in one day would've taken
    days by bus or taxi.

    Andy

  4. #4
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was really surprised how many people were drinking when
    > waiting in line
    > to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were
    > openly drinking in public on the sidewalk and kinda
    > drunkish by the time the show started... I was also
    > surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I
    > asked one of the train attendants about it, and he said:
    > "oh yeah, you can drink as much as you want and get
    > hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in the
    > station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive
    > home when they get to their station? Isn't there liability
    > issues?)




    If you live in NYC, the subway system can usually get you blocks
    from your apartment building. On the other hand if you take the
    subway to catch a commuter train to the burbs getting hammered
    is definitely a bad idea.

    On a day trip to NYC, I studied the subway system for a couple
    weeks plotting subway connections. With the $2 day passes,
    getting around the Big Apple fast and trouble free!!!

    We split a pitcher of beer for lunch, a cocktail at the fountain
    at Lincoln center, then dinner at the Stage Deli, then subwayed
    to Grand Central Terminal to look around and had a cocktail at
    the mezzanine bar. Subwayed to Penn station andAmtrak'd back to
    Philly. Regional railed to my town clean and sober for the drive
    home.

    Thanks to the subway system we saw in one day would've taken
    days and lots more dollars

    Andy


  5. #5
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    In article <k56kpq$l1o$[email protected]>, Somebody <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    >to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were openly drinking in
    >public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started... I
    >was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one of
    >the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as much
    >as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    >the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when they
    >get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)


    Normally, one can drink on a train. Anywhere in Europe, there
    are bars in train stations and often they sell drinks on the train.
    This is true in the U.S. on Amtrak trains.

    Officially you are not supposed to eat or drink on the NYC subway
    but nobody cares.

    On other local transit, it can be stricter. Here in the SF Bay
    area, the BART system is pretty strict about disallowing it,
    CalTrain is somewhat permissive, and Amtrak is completely permissive.

    No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    or Metro North, probably.


    Steve

  6. #6
    Chemo Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Oct 11, 7:23*am, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    > *I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    > to see The Colbert Report few years ago. *About 1/4 were openly drinking in
    > public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started...I
    > was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. *I asked one of
    > the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as much
    > as you want and get hammered." *Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    > the station that sold beer... *(Don't most those people drive home whenthey
    > get to their station? *Isn't there liability issues?)


    Did you see Andy there?

  7. #7
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:23:52 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    >>to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were openly drinking
    >>in
    >>public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started...
    >>I
    >>was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one
    >>of
    >>the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as
    >>much
    >>as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down
    >>in
    >>the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when
    >>they
    >>get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)
    >>
    >>

    > It is illegal to drink alcohol in public places in NYC such as you
    > describe. It is strictly prohibited by law.
    >
    > Do the cops spend all their time enforcing these laws when they see
    > them violated? Not always, and you can see folks keeping a beer can
    > hidden in a paper bag and sipping their brew on street corners in some
    > areas at some times. Still, a NYC transit cop will slap the ass of an
    > obvious drinker pretty damn quickly.
    >
    > The commuter lines, the MTA and LIRR, however, are different and some
    > trains have bar cars. And terminals and some stations have restaurants
    > and bars.
    >
    > http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...546475484.html
    >
    > Nevertheless, flaunting it in line at Colbert will bring the wrath of
    > their wranglers down on ticket holders should it be seen openly. Both
    > Colbert and Stewart shows are not particularly pleasant for ticket
    > holders in my estimation. I haven't been to either in a year or so,
    > but one of my kids is going next week, so I'll see if there is a
    > change.
    >
    > Alcoholic beverages are major advertisers on both shows, though.
    >
    > Boron




    I went with my niece about 5 years ago to both. Got there about 2 hours
    early, so to get a good seat for Colbert's show... Got high-fives when he
    ran across the audience front row. (I don't see him do that on more on TV)
    Interesting seeing the show in person; god they played horrible loud music
    between breaks. I didn't get the point of that. Nor do when they do that
    at football games.

    Where I saw it going on (I was not imbibing) was on the side of the building
    kinda hidden from the street... I wonder if it still goes on. Some of
    their audiences sound a little "rowdy"

    In Vegas, it's actually legal. Weird....

    What about tailgating at sports events in NYC?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...container_laws



  8. #8
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    "Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Oct 11, 7:23 am, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    > I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    > to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were openly drinking in
    > public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started...
    > I
    > was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one
    > of
    > the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as
    > much
    > as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    > the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when
    > they
    > get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)


    Did you see Andy there?

    ---

    haha... Actually yes! At TDS... Andy Stern



  9. #9
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k56r1e$ord$1@blue-new.[email protected]..

    > No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    > or Metro North, probably.



    This one was a subway that became a train, out towards Connecticut. If they
    don't drive home, how do they get home?

    Just seems odd they let people do it. Like having that giant liquor barn in
    the median of a highway in NH on rte 3, near Merrimack.




  10. #10
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:40:14 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:k56r1e$ord$[email protected]..
    >
    >> No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    >> or Metro North, probably.

    >
    >
    >This one was a subway that became a train, out towards Connecticut. If they
    >don't drive home, how do they get home?


    That isn't a NYC subway...that is the MTA commuter rail that travels
    underground within parts of the city. Think of that as just a train
    tunnel...like through a mountain pass. It ain't the IRT, believe me.

    >Just seems odd they let people do it. Like having that giant liquor barn in
    >the median of a highway in NH on rte 3, near Merrimack.


    It is no more reckless to allow drinking on a train than it is on a
    plane or in a restaurant or at the ballpark.

    Boron


  11. #11
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    >"Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >news:k56r1e$ord$[email protected]..


    >> No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    >> or Metro North, probably.


    >This one was a subway that became a train, out towards Connecticut. If they
    >don't drive home, how do they get home?


    There is no "subway that becomes a train", although the subways run
    both below ground and above ground, and broadly speaking, a subway
    train is a train to begin with.

    The subway does not go outside of New York City; it is confined
    to the four boroughs (excluding Staten Island).

    Some people might take the subway to (say) outer Queens, then drive. But,
    the vast majority of subway users are not driving anywhere.

    Steve

  12. #12
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:33:20 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >>
    >> Nevertheless, flaunting it in line at Colbert will bring the wrath of
    >> their wranglers down on ticket holders should it be seen openly. Both
    >> Colbert and Stewart shows are not particularly pleasant for ticket
    >> holders in my estimation. I haven't been to either in a year or so,
    >> but one of my kids is going next week, so I'll see if there is a
    >> change.
    >>
    >> Alcoholic beverages are major advertisers on both shows, though.
    >>
    >> Boron

    >
    >
    >
    >I went with my niece about 5 years ago to both. Got there about 2 hours
    >early, so to get a good seat for Colbert's show... Got high-fives when he
    >ran across the audience front row. (I don't see him do that on more on TV)
    >Interesting seeing the show in person; god they played horrible loud music
    >between breaks. I didn't get the point of that. Nor do when they do that
    >at football games.
    >
    >Where I saw it going on (I was not imbibing) was on the side of the building
    >kinda hidden from the street... I wonder if it still goes on. Some of
    >their audiences sound a little "rowdy"



    It is not in their interest to have a drunk audience. They want
    responsive people, not rowdy one. The security is pretty tight these
    days, with a lot of managing of the lines, ID checking, etc.


    >In Vegas, it's actually legal. Weird....
    >
    >What about tailgating at sports events in NYC?
    >

    You can drink until you keel over, at least at Giants and Jets games -
    well almost - the website says:

    "Please drink responsibly during the pre-game since guests who appear
    to be impaired may not be permitted to enter the stadium."

    Boron



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 11:09:40 -0400, Boron Elgar
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Alcoholic beverages are major advertisers on both shows, though.


    Really? Maybe it varies by state.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  14. #14
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    Boron Elgar <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Please drink responsibly during the pre-game since guests
    > who appear to be impaired may not be permitted to enter the
    > stadium."




    The one time I went to Giants stadium to tailgate and the
    game, I bought a gallon jug of water in. They demanded the
    jug's cap. I thought that was strange.

    Later in the game I went to buy some beers for my gracious
    hosts. They had Bud in plastic bottles, again no caps and only
    two beers per purchase.

    I realized capped glass bottles could make dangerous "beer
    grenades" in a rowdy crowd. Plastic with no caps greatly
    reduced throwing momentum or cracking open someone's skull.

    Also, knowing the mean-spirited Giants/Eagles rivalry, I felt
    it wise to blend in and left my Eagles jersey at home.

    Andy

  15. #15
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 15:40:13 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 11:09:40 -0400, Boron Elgar
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Alcoholic beverages are major advertisers on both shows, though.

    >
    >Really? Maybe it varies by state.


    Sad for you guys if you missed Carville & Matalin plugging Maker's
    Mark on Colbert [on one show where he was chugging Jack Daniels with
    Stephanopolous] <g>

    "It isn't about the Tea Party. It isn't about the Green Party. It
    isn't about the Independent Party. It isn't about the Libertarian
    Party. It isn't about the Democratic Party, and it isn't about the
    Republican Party, but it is about The Cocktail Party! "
    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/vid...ommercial.html

    Jim

  16. #16
    George Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On 10/11/2012 12:10 PM, Steve Pope wrote:
    > In article <k56kpq$l1o$[email protected]>, Somebody <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I was really surprised how many people were drinking when waiting in line
    >> to see The Colbert Report few years ago. About 1/4 were openly drinking in
    >> public on the sidewalk and kinda drunkish by the time the show started... I
    >> was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one of
    >> the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as much
    >> as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    >> the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when they
    >> get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)

    >
    > Normally, one can drink on a train. Anywhere in Europe, there
    > are bars in train stations and often they sell drinks on the train.
    > This is true in the U.S. on Amtrak trains.
    >
    > Officially you are not supposed to eat or drink on the NYC subway
    > but nobody cares.



    You must ride on a different NYC subway system that I am familiar with.
    Unfortunately the slobs who throw stuff on the floor and onto the tracks
    ruin it for everyone else. They really started policing eating and
    drinking on the subway and other stuff after Giuliani was hired.



    >
    > On other local transit, it can be stricter. Here in the SF Bay
    > area, the BART system is pretty strict about disallowing it,
    > CalTrain is somewhat permissive, and Amtrak is completely permissive.
    >
    > No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    > or Metro North, probably.
    >
    >
    > Steve
    >



  17. #17
    George Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On 10/11/2012 1:57 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:40:14 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:k56r1e$ord$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>> No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    >>> or Metro North, probably.

    >>
    >>
    >> This one was a subway that became a train, out towards Connecticut. If they
    >> don't drive home, how do they get home?

    >
    > That isn't a NYC subway...that is the MTA commuter rail that travels
    > underground within parts of the city. Think of that as just a train
    > tunnel...like through a mountain pass. It ain't the IRT, believe me.
    >
    >> Just seems odd they let people do it. Like having that giant liquor barn in
    >> the median of a highway in NH on rte 3, near Merrimack.

    >
    > It is no more reckless to allow drinking on a train than it is on a
    > plane or in a restaurant or at the ballpark.
    >
    > Boron
    >


    The LIRR has a few bar cars. However it is unusual to see drinking on
    the NYC subway system.

    The problem on the subway used to be the few who would discard cans and
    bottles (often with some liquid still in them) right on the floor or
    just toss on the tracks. The subway (and NYC in general) was quite a
    mess prior to Giuliani.

  18. #18
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Fri, 12 Oct 2012 08:03:30 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 10/11/2012 1:57 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
    >> On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 13:40:14 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:k56r1e$ord$[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>>> No, most New Yorkers do not drive home from the subway. On the LIRR
    >>>> or Metro North, probably.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> This one was a subway that became a train, out towards Connecticut. If they
    >>> don't drive home, how do they get home?

    >>
    >> That isn't a NYC subway...that is the MTA commuter rail that travels
    >> underground within parts of the city. Think of that as just a train
    >> tunnel...like through a mountain pass. It ain't the IRT, believe me.
    >>
    >>> Just seems odd they let people do it. Like having that giant liquor barn in
    >>> the median of a highway in NH on rte 3, near Merrimack.

    >>
    >> It is no more reckless to allow drinking on a train than it is on a
    >> plane or in a restaurant or at the ballpark.
    >>
    >> Boron
    >>

    >
    >The LIRR has a few bar cars. However it is unusual to see drinking on
    >the NYC subway system.


    Drinking is seen all the time, but for the vast majority of those
    sightings, the drink is not (obviously) alcoholic.
    >
    >The problem on the subway used to be the few who would discard cans and
    >bottles (often with some liquid still in them) right on the floor or
    >just toss on the tracks. The subway (and NYC in general) was quite a
    >mess prior to Giuliani.



    I first moved to Manhattan in 1971. I have seen the system's ups and
    down over all these years. I also think of Guiliani somewhat like
    Mussolini.

    Boron

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 11:09:40 -0400, Boron Elgar wrote:

    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:23:52 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I was also surprised you can drink on the subway/train in NYC. I asked one of
    >>the train attendants about it, and he said: "oh yeah, you can drink as much
    >>as you want and get hammered." Then he pointed out there was stand down in
    >>the station that sold beer... (Don't most those people drive home when they
    >>get to their station? Isn't there liability issues?)
    >>
    >>

    > It is illegal to drink alcohol in public places in NYC such as you
    > describe. It is strictly prohibited by law.

    ......

    > The commuter lines, the MTA and LIRR, however, are different and some
    > trains have bar cars. And terminals and some stations have restaurants
    > and bars.


    Here is an obvious sign of true clinical narcissism. She will
    patently deny something all out, then look it up and change her tune
    in mid stride, but still refuse to go back and revise what she
    originally typed.

    -sw

  20. #20
    Gov. Smirk Guest

    Default Re: NYC subway/train and alcohol



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDeWWAkwogA

    He moves in circles of friends
    Who just pretend
    That they like him
    He does the same to them
    And when you put it all together
    There`s the model of a charmless man


    He talks at speed
    He gets nose bleeds
    He doesn´t see
    His days are tumbling
    Down upon him
    And yet he tries so hard to please
    He´s just so keen
    For you to listen
    But no-one´s listening
    And when you put it all together
    There´s the model of a charmless man

    He thinks he`s educated airs
    Those family sharesWill protect him
    That you`ll respect him
    And yet he tries so hard to please
    He`s just so keenFor you to listen
    But no-one`s listenig
    And when you put it all togetherThere`s the model of a charmless man

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