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Thread: Now I'm in for it....

  1. #201
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    On 9/19/2012 5:43 PM, Gary wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> Mom may not have been the best of cooks but she didn't take us to fast food
    >> joints. End of story.

    >
    >
    > Back in the early 60's, McDonalds served much better food than my mom did.
    > Hamburgers, 15 cents and small fries, 12 cents. I often spent my allowance
    > on this horrible fast food.
    >


    When i was a kid we used to have McD's maybe 2-3 times a year. Back
    then it was a treat. Not sure why, maybe it was because the food came
    in a bag or maybe just because it was different from the same foods we
    had from week to week at home. My mom's home cooking was good but a
    treat of mickie d's was still a treat.



  2. #202
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    On 9/19/2012 9:31 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sep 19, 1:07 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >>
    >> On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 17:40:50 -0600, gloria p wrote:
    >>>>
    >>> We met friends for lunch a few years ago at Ted's Montana Grill (Ted
    >>> Turner) and the waitress strongly recommended the meatloaf so we both
    >>> ordered it. It was spiced like no other meatloaf I've ever had. I don't
    >>> know what herb they used but it was...unpleasant.

    >>
    >> Ted's is known for BISON meatloaf. Here's one recipe that may be very
    >> similar to the restaurnat version (From Ted's personal chef)
    >>
    >> http://www.marthastewart.com/351313/bison-meatloaf
    >>
    >> -sw
    >>
    >>

    > That 'meatloaf' recipe doesn't even sound appetizing.
    >

    It sort of sounds interesting with the chicken stock and wine used to
    baste while the meatloaf is cooking but I suspect that's just because
    the bison meat is so lean.

  3. #203
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf.... was Re: Now I'm in for it....

    On 9/18/2012 11:37 PM, gregz wrote:

    > I love meat loaf, but I find portions given are very small, assuming it's
    > costly to make. I can see getting tired of meatloaf, but please give me a
    > chance. And chili was depression like food, but it's not cheap. I guess
    > it's what you put in it.


    I think meatloaf is one of the versatile dishes. I often use up food
    that's getting old when making meatloaf, and add veggies to give them
    (the veggies) more flavor. Examples are spinach (always chopped up raw
    and added to the meat for mixing), shredded carrots, onions of course,
    and probably more I haven't tried yet. I have a meatloaf I took out of
    the freezer for dinner tonight but didn't get to cooking it. When I buy
    a lot of meat, I make up things to freeze and cook later, and meatloaf
    is one of them. This one has a mix of beef, veal and pork in it. Can't
    wait to try it when I cook it up tomorrow.


  4. #204
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1ti7czgq19nya$.[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 09:38:18 -0400, George M. Middius wrote:
    >
    >> Really? I've never met the kids. And I just found out only one belongs
    >> to the guests -- the other is his friend.

    >
    > Classic. Guests tell you they're going to bring their "kids", then we
    > find out one of them is just tagging along for a free meal - not even
    > one of their kids. Niiiiice.
    >
    >> BTW, it's not really a party, just a celebration that warrants special
    >> food. So I'm going with fish as the main course, the type depending on
    >> what looks good in the store tha day.

    >
    > So you're disregarding the numerous suggestions that people spent
    > collective hours on, and went with your original plan.
    >
    > Well, wasn't THIS a productive thread!
    >
    > I'm still trying to figure out why you're celebrating a funeral, but
    > whatever.
    >
    >> Thanks to everybody except sqwishy, whose ego got in the way of any
    >> chance
    >> he might be helpful.

    >
    > I was in the majority of people who would've rather picked apart your
    > story and situation rather than make any kind of honest, productive
    > suggestions. Looks like I chose the right road, too. Eh?
    >
    > Hey, Mike - how about serving fish?


    He never even said what kind of fish.



  5. #205
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....


    Cheri wrote:

    >You're pushing 80 Judy, how many
    > *peers* do you invite these days that
    > have small children? I have nine
    > grandkids and 4 great grandkids who
    > love going to grandmas house, so
    > believe me I know how to entertain kids.
    > At my age (and yours) I don't expect my
    > friends to bring kids with them like I
    > used to expect them to in the old days
    > so I have no need to say...please find a
    > sitter for your kids, it would more likely
    > be, please find a sitter for your hubby or
    > wife. LOL


    Jeepers Cheri! Don't make me any older than I am...what is this about
    pushing 80?! =:} I'll be 72 next month, and anymore when we have anyone
    for dinner, it's for a special occasion, such as a holiday, or someone's
    birthday, so is usually just family, as it is plenty of people as it is.
    When they are gather here, there would be our youngest son and wife, her
    two children, and now the daughter has a husband and is expecting a baby
    in Feb., and also his two daughters by his first marriage (one has a
    fiance') our oldest daughter and hubby, their two daughters and the one
    has a fiance' now, and their youngest is divorced, but has a 3 year old
    daughter (she is the youngest member of our family) and also our younger
    unmarried daughter, who only has 3 cats and leaves them at home. (LOL)

    Good thing we have a big dining room, as when they're all here, that
    makes 17 altogether, counting the "significant others" that are
    included, and when older son is visiting from TX., that's 18 in all.

    Judy


  6. #206
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "Sqwertz" wrote in message news:1qn76i98pdbn9$.[email protected]..

    On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 12:19:11 -0400, jmcquown wrote:

    > Exactly, Dave. We didn't go out to dinner. Why that's so difficult to
    > believe, I don't know.



    Heck, we had McDonalds delivered to our grade school once a month!
    With big jugs of that nasty orange drink and limp fries. And on field
    trips. And on those field trips we passed numerous McDonalds. And
    for Halloween people would give out $.50 gift certificates instead of
    candy (McDonalds advertised them heavily).

    You DO NOT have to go out to dinner to know that McD's exists. Stop
    making up all these lame excuses.

    -sw
    ******************

    Again, you're nuts. Why would I need to make up an excuse for not knowing
    about McDonald's?

    We didn't go out to dinner. I didn't spend my childhood watching
    television, hence no commercial influence.

    Hell, I lived in Bangkok for two years starting when I was age 9. If you
    think there was TV advertising in Thailand in 1969 for McDonald's you are
    sadly mistaken. If you think there was a McDonald's in Bangkok at that
    time, you'd be mistaken.

    OB Food: I enjoyed snacking on dried squid, which was rather like beef
    jerky, except it was squid. I don't think they serve that at McDonald's.

    When we got back to the States we lived in (of all places) McDonald, Ohio.
    This tiny town didn't even have a telephone booth, much less a McDonald's
    restaurant.

    Please, do tell me all about my childhood. I'm just dying to hear your
    version

    Jill


  7. #207
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "Dave Smith" wrote in message news:av46s.96598$[email protected]..

    On 18/09/2012 12:31 PM, jmcquown wrote:

    >> I'd ask first, most kids won't eat meat loaf,

    >
    > If you make meatloaf that kids won't eat, you need a better recipe.
    > ****************
    >
    > You never met my brother. He'll eat practically any form of ground
    > meat... as long as it's not meat loaf. Go figure.
    >


    I think a lot of people dislike meat loaf because they have never had a
    good one. I make a dent on, but I have had some really good ones in
    restaurants. If I see meat loaf specials or meatloaf sandwiches offered
    I usually get them and I have never been disappointed.
    ****************

    When John and I eat at Barbara Jean's restaurant he always orders the meat
    loaf.
    I simply don't trust meat loaf I haven't made myself. I do make good meat
    loaf if I do say so myself

    Jill



  8. #208
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    On Sep 19, 3:28 pm, dsi1 <d...@eternal-september.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > On 9/18/2012 3:51 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >
    > > The last meatloaf I made had a texture that was off. Someone had
    > > suggested
    > > to me that I use potato flakes as the filler. This made the meatloaf
    > > overly
    > > soft. Next time I will use some whole wheat bread crumbs.

    >
    > My meatloaf tends to come out differently also. I've been using canned
    > breadcrumbs which gives a tender meatloaf. I'm also trying out different
    > ways of mixing. My next meatloaf will be lightly mixed and I'm not going
    > to add any eggs. My goal is to have a semi-crumbly texture. If I feel
    > kicky, I'll add in a can of corn.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    >

    I made a meatloaf, by mistake once, without an egg. It will
    definitely crumble and won't even want to stay together to get it in
    the pan.
    *******************

    I agree. The egg is necessary as a binder along with whatever other filler
    is added to flesh out the recipe.

    Sheldon is absolutely right about the origins of meat loaf. It was to
    stretch the food dollar when money was tight. Heh. Still is
    That doesn't make it any less tasty if you have a good recipe. I use
    oatmeal along with egg, and add bottled cocktail sauce to the mix.

    Jill


  9. #209
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "Judy Haffner" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..



    Jill wrote:

    >I'd ask the parents. (Can't be a terribly
    > special occasion if they can't be
    > bothered to find a sitter.)


    I think it would really rude for someone to invite parents for a meal
    and then tell them to "please find a sitter", unless one is having a
    special meal for an all-adult occasion. If I wanted the parents to my
    house for a meal, that would INCLUDE the children...otherwise I would
    invite a couple with no kids only.

    In most cases, I'd much rather cook for kids than adults any day of the
    year, and back when I was raising my four, I'd been highly insulted if a
    "friend" invited hubby and I to dinner and said "oh, and by the way
    don't bring your kids!"

    Judy
    ****************

    Convenient snippage. Did you read the original post? He was expecting to
    cook for two COUPLES. Suddenly it turned into two couples and their
    children.

    Jill


  10. #210
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    On Thu, 20 Sep 2012 03:16:15 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "Judy Haffner" wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    > Jill wrote:
    >
    > >I'd ask the parents. (Can't be a terribly
    > > special occasion if they can't be
    > > bothered to find a sitter.)

    >
    > I think it would really rude for someone to invite parents for a meal
    > and then tell them to "please find a sitter", unless one is having a
    > special meal for an all-adult occasion. If I wanted the parents to my
    > house for a meal, that would INCLUDE the children...otherwise I would
    > invite a couple with no kids only.
    >
    > In most cases, I'd much rather cook for kids than adults any day of the
    > year, and back when I was raising my four, I'd been highly insulted if a
    > "friend" invited hubby and I to dinner and said "oh, and by the way
    > don't bring your kids!"
    >
    > Judy
    > ****************
    >
    > Convenient snippage. Did you read the original post? He was expecting to
    > cook for two COUPLES. Suddenly it turned into two couples and their
    > children.
    >


    Do we know what the special occasion is?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #211
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 20 Sep 2012 03:16:15 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Judy Haffner" wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Jill wrote:
    >>
    >> >I'd ask the parents. (Can't be a terribly
    >> > special occasion if they can't be
    >> > bothered to find a sitter.)

    >>
    >> I think it would really rude for someone to invite parents for a meal
    >> and then tell them to "please find a sitter", unless one is having a
    >> special meal for an all-adult occasion. If I wanted the parents to my
    >> house for a meal, that would INCLUDE the children...otherwise I would
    >> invite a couple with no kids only.
    >>
    >> In most cases, I'd much rather cook for kids than adults any day of the
    >> year, and back when I was raising my four, I'd been highly insulted if a
    >> "friend" invited hubby and I to dinner and said "oh, and by the way
    >> don't bring your kids!"
    >>
    >> Judy
    >> ****************
    >>
    >> Convenient snippage. Did you read the original post? He was expecting
    >> to
    >> cook for two COUPLES. Suddenly it turned into two couples and their
    >> children.
    >>

    >
    > Do we know what the special occasion is?


    Yes! It's a funeral. Pay attention!



  12. #212
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "Judy Haffner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Jeepers Cheri! Don't make me any older than I am...what is this about
    > pushing 80?! =:} I'll be 72 next month, and anymore when we have anyone
    > for dinner, it's for a special occasion, such as a holiday, or someone's


    I was kidding Judy, I know how old you are, I'm right on your heels. These
    days, I have more parties that involve kid things like winning/losing
    baseball championships etc. but I must admit...I'm rather tired of the other
    kind, so don't do it real often anymore.

    Cheri


  13. #213
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    On Thu, 20 Sep 2012 02:46:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Thu, 20 Sep 2012 03:16:15 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Judy Haffner" wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]..
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Jill wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >I'd ask the parents. (Can't be a terribly
    > >> > special occasion if they can't be
    > >> > bothered to find a sitter.)
    > >>
    > >> I think it would really rude for someone to invite parents for a meal
    > >> and then tell them to "please find a sitter", unless one is having a
    > >> special meal for an all-adult occasion. If I wanted the parents to my
    > >> house for a meal, that would INCLUDE the children...otherwise I would
    > >> invite a couple with no kids only.
    > >>
    > >> In most cases, I'd much rather cook for kids than adults any day of the
    > >> year, and back when I was raising my four, I'd been highly insulted if a
    > >> "friend" invited hubby and I to dinner and said "oh, and by the way
    > >> don't bring your kids!"
    > >>
    > >> Judy
    > >> ****************
    > >>
    > >> Convenient snippage. Did you read the original post? He was expecting
    > >> to
    > >> cook for two COUPLES. Suddenly it turned into two couples and their
    > >> children.
    > >>

    > >
    > > Do we know what the special occasion is?

    >
    > Yes! It's a funeral. Pay attention!
    >

    Why don't *you* pay attention for a change?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  14. #214
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "tert in seattle" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 07:36:38 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 17:56:39 -0400, jmcquown wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Sqwertz" wrote in message news:[email protected]..

    >>
    >>>> But you said you didn't even KNOW about it. The only way I can
    >>>> imagine that is if you WERE isolated (queue the GEICO "Living under a
    >>>> rock" commercial).
    >>>>
    >>>> -sw
    >>>> **************
    >>>>
    >>>> And that's absolutely right; I didn't know about it. How would I know
    >>>> if
    >>>> our parents never took us there?!
    >>>
    >>> Uhh.... you drive by McDonalds, other people talk about McDonalds,
    >>> advertising on radio and TV....
    >>>
    >>> C'mon Jill - admit it - you DID live in the attic!
    >>>
    >>> -sw

    >>
    >> if you lived out in the boonies you didn't have to live in an attic to
    >> be unaware of McD's in the 60s and 70s

    >
    > She said she moved around a lot as a kid, so she saw a lot of stuff.
    > She said she remembers a Burger Chef. So that means at least part of
    > that time she was NOT in the boonies and well within McD's
    > territories.
    >
    > -sw


    Yes, Jill is a big fat liar. I'm sure she made up all that stuff about
    Andy pestering her on the phone too.

    FWIW I'm trying to pinpoint when I became aware of McDs, also having lived
    in the boonies as a child except for a few months in Iowa City (and I have
    no recollection of McDs from then)...pretty sure I never ate at one until
    we lived near Marquette MI which would have been ca. 1975 at the earliest.
    I remember the Big Mac "two all beef patties" etc from around that time
    or maybe a little later. It sticks as something us 4th or 5th graders
    enjoyed saying, repeatedly, with various substitutions like "sesame street
    bun". I didn't pay any attention to the radio at that age (8 years old)
    except to find out about snow days. I must have been exposed to the tv
    ads if they were running in our market. I'm guessing Jill was an adult
    already by that point.
    *******************

    In 1975 I was 15. By that time of course I'd heard of McDonald's. I might
    have even eaten there when I was a teenager. If so, it must have been
    underwhelming.

    When I was a kid (younger than you were, I'd say 5 or 6) I hadn't heard of
    McDonald's. *IF* McD's had TV ads in the mid-60's I don't recall seeing
    them. As previously stated, after school and on weekends we played outside;
    we weren't glued to the television. And, being a kid, if I saw the ads I
    probably tuned them out. Remember, this was years before they started
    erecting playgrounds and giving out toys.

    The only reason I remember Burger Chef because we'd sometimes stop there on
    our way to a place called Cal's Cottages in NY. Dad took us there on
    vacation when we lived in NJ. (That would have been around 1965 or 66.) We
    moved from Lakehurst, NJ to Vista, CA in 1966. The Marines sent Dad to Viet
    Nam, leaving Mom with three pre-teen children. She rarely wasted money
    taking us out to eat at fast food joints, although I do vaguely recall her
    taking us to Taco Bell once Why any of this is so important to Steve is
    a mystery.

    Jill


  15. #215
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "Gary" wrote in message news:[email protected]..

    Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > My all time favorite was bean with bacon.


    You got me there, Julie. I used to LOVE that brand of Campbells soup, made
    with a can of milk added. I had totally forgotten about that and I haven't
    had it in over 20 years. It's on my grocery list for next Saturday
    morning. :-)

    G.
    ****************
    It'll do in a pinch. But I much prefer making a big pot of my dad's navy
    bean soup. He didn't cook often but when he did, he did it well. If he had
    a meaty ham bone he'd use that, although crisp bacon or salt pork work

    Jill


  16. #216
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    "George M. Middius" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    Julie Bove wrote:

    > I may be the odd one out but I loved veggies as a kid. Fish? No.


    Everybody likes brussels sprouts with cheese sauce, right?

    *****************
    I do! I even liked it as a kid. (I don't even need the cheese sauce.) And
    I'd have liked the fish, too. I was a bit strange, even then

    Jill


  17. #217
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    On 19/09/2012 4:34 PM, Judy Haffner wrote:

    > Yes, do live in Alaska, but really never think of people here being any
    > different than anywhere else, I guess, but perhaps I feel as I do
    > because of the way I was raised. As an only child, I went everywhere
    > with my parents, and when we went to dinner, or had company for dinner,
    > it was close friends, or family and children were expected to be a part
    > of it too.
    >
    > There have been times we would have a potluck at the house, later in the
    > evening and it would be for adults only, but I always told our friends
    > when inviting them. Mostly I've always preferred a family meal with
    > children included.
    >




    Holy cow. you story is changing. You started off saying that you think
    it would be rude for someone to invite parents for a meal and tell them
    to find a sitter. Now you have added a disqualifier. You were inviting
    close friends and family, or being invited to close friends and family.
    Yet, you suggested those of use who think that dinner parties are for
    adults are anti-child.






  18. #218
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    Cheri wrote:
    >
    > "Judy Haffner" wrote :
    > >
    > > Jeepers Cheri! Don't make me any older than I am...what is this about
    > > pushing 80?! =:} I'll be 72 next month,

    >
    > I was kidding Judy, I know how old you are,


    And now I do too.
    I thought women don't like to tell their age.
    Now both of you have blown your cover. ehehhe

    G.

  19. #219
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Gary" wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    > >
    > > My all time favorite was bean with bacon.

    >
    > You got me there, Julie. I used to LOVE that brand of Campbells soup, made
    > with a can of milk added. I had totally forgotten about that and I haven't
    > had it in over 20 years. It's on my grocery list for next Saturday
    > morning. :-)
    >
    > G.
    > ****************
    > It'll do in a pinch. But I much prefer making a big pot of my dad's navy
    > bean soup. He didn't cook often but when he did, he did it well. If he had
    > a meaty ham bone he'd use that, although crisp bacon or salt pork work
    >
    > Jill


    I love navy bean soup and it's on my winter weekend list. Last year, I used
    the wrong pork and it wasn't so good. I'll get it right this winter. I'll
    ask for advice here too before I make it. I think the salt pork might be
    it.

    G.

  20. #220
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Now I'm in for it....

    jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > I was a bit strange, even then


    You still are!
    (JK you there, Jill.)

    G.

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