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Thread: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make
    pizza. But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza
    dough from scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with
    this type of dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the
    formula that worked--or provide a pointer to it? Thanks.
    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Jean B. wrote:
    > I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    > But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    > scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of dough
    > as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that worked--or
    > provide a pointer to it? Thanks.


    It works great as pizza dough. Here's a good blog post about it:

    http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.co...lmost-all.html

    Serene

    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make
    > pizza. But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza
    > dough from scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with
    > this type of dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the
    > formula that worked--or provide a pointer to it? Thanks.



    I've used the master recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day
    (Hertzberg and Francois) and my method is rather unconventional but we
    like it. Roll a gob of dough thin on parchment. Dock it and bake it on
    a stone at 450 for only a couple minutes (to firm up the dough for the
    second baking). If the dough puffs, stab it to deflate. Set aside
    until it's pizza time. Flip the pizza crust and put the toppings on
    what was the bottom side of the crust. Slide into oven on stone and
    bake until it's done usually only a couple-few minutes.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Breaded Pork Tenderloin, 2-18-2010

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Jean B. wrote:
    > > I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    > > But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    > > scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of dough
    > > as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that worked--or
    > > provide a pointer to it? Thanks.

    >
    > It works great as pizza dough. Here's a good blog post about it:
    >
    > http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.co...rusty-almost-a
    > ll.html
    >
    > Serene


    Tube biscuit dough (or your own) also work well for pizza crusts.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  5. #5
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Jean B. wrote:
    >>> I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    >>> But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    >>> scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of dough
    >>> as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that worked--or
    >>> provide a pointer to it? Thanks.

    >> It works great as pizza dough. Here's a good blog post about it:
    >>
    >> http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.co...rusty-almost-a
    >> ll.html
    >>
    >> Serene

    >
    > Tube biscuit dough (or your own) also work well for pizza crusts.


    Oh, dear.

    I really don't think I'd like that.

    Serene

    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  6. #6
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make
    >> pizza. But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza
    >> dough from scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with
    >> this type of dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the
    >> formula that worked--or provide a pointer to it? Thanks.

    >
    >
    > I've used the master recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day
    > (Hertzberg and Francois) and my method is rather unconventional but we
    > like it. Roll a gob of dough thin on parchment. Dock it and bake it on
    > a stone at 450 for only a couple minutes (to firm up the dough for the
    > second baking). If the dough puffs, stab it to deflate. Set aside
    > until it's pizza time. Flip the pizza crust and put the toppings on
    > what was the bottom side of the crust. Slide into oven on stone and
    > bake until it's done usually only a couple-few minutes.


    Merci. I will forward this to myself--and perhaps even buy that
    book today.

    --
    Jean B.

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Jean B. wrote:
    >>> I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    >>> But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    >>> scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of dough
    >>> as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that worked--or
    >>> provide a pointer to it? Thanks.

    >> It works great as pizza dough. Here's a good blog post about it:
    >>
    >> http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.co...rusty-almost-a
    >> ll.html
    >>
    >> Serene

    >
    > Tube biscuit dough (or your own) also work well for pizza crusts.


    Well, the point right now is that said person seems to want to
    make more things from scratch! I figure he might want to start
    out with something easy.

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Serene Vannoy wrote:
    > Jean B. wrote:
    >> I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    >> But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    >> scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of
    >> dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that
    >> worked--or provide a pointer to it? Thanks.

    >
    > It works great as pizza dough. Here's a good blog post about it:
    >
    > http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.co...lmost-all.html
    >
    >
    > Serene
    >

    Thanks, Serene. I will pass this on--and maybe even absorb this
    myself.

    --
    Jean B.

  9. #9
    George Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On 2/27/2010 9:44 AM, Jean B. wrote:
    > I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    > But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    > scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of dough
    > as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that worked--or
    > provide a pointer to it? Thanks.


    The key is the long slow rise of the dough in the fridge. I do remember
    someone posting similar to what I make.

    Found it:


    Original post by "zxcvbob":

    "
    Bob's Pizza D'oh

    335 grams (2 cups, packed) bread flour
    1 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp instant dried yeast
    30 grams (2 Tbsp) olive oil or vegetable oil or bacon grease
    1 cup warm water

    Combine half of the flour with all the remaining ingredients in a 4
    cup or larger plastic bowl that has a lid. Beat with a fork until it
    looks like pancake batter. Stir in the remaining flour until well
    mixed, mostly. Does not have to be kneaded.

    Let it sit out for a half an hour or so to give the yeast a chance to
    activate, then snap the lid on and put it in the refrigerator, at
    least overnight. Keep refrigerated and ready to use for up to a week.
    If the lid pops off in the fridge, punch the dough down and snap the
    lid back on.

    Coat your hands with flour or oil when pressing the dough into the
    pizza pan because it will be kind of sticky.
    "

  10. #10
    George Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On 2/27/2010 11:45 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article<[email protected]>, "Jean B."<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make
    >> pizza. But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza
    >> dough from scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with
    >> this type of dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the
    >> formula that worked--or provide a pointer to it? Thanks.

    >
    >
    > I've used the master recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day
    > (Hertzberg and Francois) and my method is rather unconventional but we
    > like it. Roll a gob of dough thin on parchment. Dock it and bake it on
    > a stone at 450 for only a couple minutes (to firm up the dough for the
    > second baking). If the dough puffs, stab it to deflate. Set aside
    > until it's pizza time. Flip the pizza crust and put the toppings on
    > what was the bottom side of the crust. Slide into oven on stone and
    > bake until it's done usually only a couple-few minutes.


    But the bubbles add a lot of extra flavor when then brown or even char
    when you cook the pizza.

  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    George wrote:
    > Original post by "zxcvbob":
    >
    > "
    > Bob's Pizza D'oh
    >
    > 335 grams (2 cups, packed) bread flour
    > 1 tsp salt
    > 1/2 tsp instant dried yeast
    > 30 grams (2 Tbsp) olive oil or vegetable oil or bacon grease
    > 1 cup warm water
    >
    > Combine half of the flour with all the remaining ingredients in a 4
    > cup or larger plastic bowl that has a lid. Beat with a fork until it
    > looks like pancake batter. Stir in the remaining flour until well
    > mixed, mostly. Does not have to be kneaded.
    >
    > Let it sit out for a half an hour or so to give the yeast a chance to
    > activate, then snap the lid on and put it in the refrigerator, at
    > least overnight. Keep refrigerated and ready to use for up to a week.
    > If the lid pops off in the fridge, punch the dough down and snap the
    > lid back on.
    >
    > Coat your hands with flour or oil when pressing the dough into the
    > pizza pan because it will be kind of sticky.
    > "


    Thanks! I also just went out and acquired the book that Barb
    mentioned, and I am about to go out to look for another one. I
    hope my friend is appreciative.

    --
    Jean B.

    All truth passes through three stages.
    First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently
    opposed. Third, it is accepted as being
    self-evident. --Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)

  12. #12
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Jean B. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Didn't someone here just have success with
    > this type of dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the
    > formula that worked--or provide a pointer to it?


    You may be thinking of me, since I said I have used a no-knead
    technique successfully for pizza, however it is not the
    same no-knead technique popular among RFC people.

    I believe I adapted this from a no-knead, single-rise bread recipe
    in The Settlement Cook Book.

    No-knead Spelt Pizza:

    3/4 to 1 cup of hot (110 degree) water (depending on how thick
    of a pizza you are trying to create)
    up to 8 oz (2 cups) whole spelt flour
    dash of salt
    1 t sugar
    1/2 package yeast

    Combine water, yeast, sugar, salt, and 1 T of spelt flour in a
    mixing bowl. Let sit five minutes. Add enough flour to form
    a thin batter; stir thoroughly with a fork and let sit another
    five minutes. It should be bubbling from the yeast.

    Now add enough flour to form a thick batter (or thin dough if you
    prefer) and beat steadily with a large fork for several minutes;
    it should become somewhat elastic. This step substitutes
    for kneading. Finally combine this with enough flour to
    form a medium-thick dough -- still somewhat wetter than a
    stiff bread dough. You do not need to beat it or knead it at
    this stage. Slide the dough into a greased, 9" round cake pan
    (or deep-dish pizza pan of a similar size) and spread it out
    into the desired shape.

    Let it rise in a warm place (usually for 80 or 90 minutes),
    add your pizza toppings (being careful not to smash the dough
    down), and bake for 20 to 25 minutes in a 400 degree oven.

    Steve

  13. #13
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 09:26:03 -0800, Serene Vannoy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Omelet wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Jean B. wrote:
    >>>> I admit I didn't pay adequate attention, because I don't make pizza.
    >>>> But a friend was just opining that he needed to make pizza dough from
    >>>> scratch. Didn't someone here just have success with this type of dough
    >>>> as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the formula that worked--or
    >>>> provide a pointer to it? Thanks.
    >>> It works great as pizza dough. Here's a good blog post about it:
    >>>
    >>> http://veganfeastkitchen.blogspot.co...rusty-almost-a
    >>> ll.html
    >>>
    >>> Serene

    >>
    >> Tube biscuit dough (or your own) also work well for pizza crusts.

    >
    >Oh, dear.
    >
    >I really don't think I'd like that.


    If you roll it out thinly enough, it's great. I made pizza for dinner
    tonight with a basic biscuit crust - I put a minimal amount of baking
    powder into it so that it would rise VERY slightly and it was
    otherwise normal. It tastes just fine and you have the crust ready in
    five minutes.

    My recipe (actually it was my brothers...)
    2 cups flour
    A tiny bit of baking powder
    Sprinkles of onion and garlic powder
    1/3 cup oil
    2/3 cup water.

    Mix everything together and it'll form a soft dough (if it's too dry
    add a little more oil) that you can press straight into your pan and
    top.
    --

    My website - http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    My cooking blog - http://kajikit.wordpress.com
    My crafty blog - http://kajikit.blogspot.com

  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Jean B. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Didn't someone here just have success with
    >> this type of dough as pizza dough? Would she/he please post the
    >> formula that worked--or provide a pointer to it?

    >
    > You may be thinking of me, since I said I have used a no-knead
    > technique successfully for pizza, however it is not the
    > same no-knead technique popular among RFC people.
    >
    > I believe I adapted this from a no-knead, single-rise bread recipe
    > in The Settlement Cook Book.
    >
    > No-knead Spelt Pizza:
    >
    > 3/4 to 1 cup of hot (110 degree) water (depending on how thick
    > of a pizza you are trying to create)
    > up to 8 oz (2 cups) whole spelt flour
    > dash of salt
    > 1 t sugar
    > 1/2 package yeast
    >
    > Combine water, yeast, sugar, salt, and 1 T of spelt flour in a
    > mixing bowl. Let sit five minutes. Add enough flour to form
    > a thin batter; stir thoroughly with a fork and let sit another
    > five minutes. It should be bubbling from the yeast.
    >
    > Now add enough flour to form a thick batter (or thin dough if you
    > prefer) and beat steadily with a large fork for several minutes;
    > it should become somewhat elastic. This step substitutes
    > for kneading. Finally combine this with enough flour to
    > form a medium-thick dough -- still somewhat wetter than a
    > stiff bread dough. You do not need to beat it or knead it at
    > this stage. Slide the dough into a greased, 9" round cake pan
    > (or deep-dish pizza pan of a similar size) and spread it out
    > into the desired shape.
    >
    > Let it rise in a warm place (usually for 80 or 90 minutes),
    > add your pizza toppings (being careful not to smash the dough
    > down), and bake for 20 to 25 minutes in a 400 degree oven.
    >
    > Steve


    Thanks! I may very well have been thinking of your post.

    I will add this tnt recipe to the two books I bought today, and
    the augmentations I am finding online.

    --
    Jean B.

    All truth passes through three stages.
    First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently
    opposed. Third, it is accepted as being
    self-evident. --Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)

  15. #15
    koko Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:02:01 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >George wrote:
    >> Original post by "zxcvbob":
    >>
    >> "
    >> Bob's Pizza D'oh
    >>
    >> 335 grams (2 cups, packed) bread flour
    >> 1 tsp salt
    >> 1/2 tsp instant dried yeast
    >> 30 grams (2 Tbsp) olive oil or vegetable oil or bacon grease
    >> 1 cup warm water
    >>
    >> Combine half of the flour with all the remaining ingredients in a 4
    >> cup or larger plastic bowl that has a lid. Beat with a fork until it
    >> looks like pancake batter. Stir in the remaining flour until well
    >> mixed, mostly. Does not have to be kneaded.
    >>
    >> Let it sit out for a half an hour or so to give the yeast a chance to
    >> activate, then snap the lid on and put it in the refrigerator, at
    >> least overnight. Keep refrigerated and ready to use for up to a week.
    >> If the lid pops off in the fridge, punch the dough down and snap the
    >> lid back on.
    >>
    >> Coat your hands with flour or oil when pressing the dough into the
    >> pizza pan because it will be kind of sticky.
    >> "

    >
    >Thanks! I also just went out and acquired the book that Barb
    >mentioned, and I am about to go out to look for another one. I
    >hope my friend is appreciative.


    I got it today also. I downloaded it from Barnes and Noble.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 02/20/10

  16. #16
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    koko wrote:
    > On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:02:01 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> George wrote:
    >>> Original post by "zxcvbob":
    >>>
    >>> "
    >>> Bob's Pizza D'oh
    >>>
    >>> 335 grams (2 cups, packed) bread flour
    >>> 1 tsp salt
    >>> 1/2 tsp instant dried yeast
    >>> 30 grams (2 Tbsp) olive oil or vegetable oil or bacon grease
    >>> 1 cup warm water
    >>>
    >>> Combine half of the flour with all the remaining ingredients in a 4
    >>> cup or larger plastic bowl that has a lid. Beat with a fork until it
    >>> looks like pancake batter. Stir in the remaining flour until well
    >>> mixed, mostly. Does not have to be kneaded.
    >>>
    >>> Let it sit out for a half an hour or so to give the yeast a chance to
    >>> activate, then snap the lid on and put it in the refrigerator, at
    >>> least overnight. Keep refrigerated and ready to use for up to a week.
    >>> If the lid pops off in the fridge, punch the dough down and snap the
    >>> lid back on.
    >>>
    >>> Coat your hands with flour or oil when pressing the dough into the
    >>> pizza pan because it will be kind of sticky.
    >>> "

    >> Thanks! I also just went out and acquired the book that Barb
    >> mentioned, and I am about to go out to look for another one. I
    >> hope my friend is appreciative.

    >
    > I got it today also. I downloaded it from Barnes and Noble.
    >
    > koko
    > --
    >
    > There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    > George Bernard Shaw
    > www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    > updated 02/20/10


    Ah. Well, that does sounds convenient. Can you print from the
    little gizmos, if that is what you downloaded to?

    --
    Jean B.

  17. #17
    koko Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On Sun, 28 Feb 2010 08:43:51 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >koko wrote:
    >> On Sat, 27 Feb 2010 17:02:01 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>

    snippage

    >>>> "
    >>> Thanks! I also just went out and acquired the book that Barb
    >>> mentioned, and I am about to go out to look for another one. I
    >>> hope my friend is appreciative.

    >>
    >> I got it today also. I downloaded it from Barnes and Noble.
    >>
    >> koko
    >> --


    >
    >Ah. Well, that does sounds convenient. Can you print from the
    >little gizmos, if that is what you downloaded to?


    Well, one gizmo I downloaded it to is my computer, the other is my
    iPhone. I just bring the recipe up on the computer or iPhone and put
    on the counter as I'm cooking, no need to print out.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 02/20/10

  18. #18
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    koko wrote:
    > Well, one gizmo I downloaded it to is my computer, the other is my
    > iPhone. I just bring the recipe up on the computer or iPhone and put
    > on the counter as I'm cooking, no need to print out.
    >
    > koko
    > --
    >
    > There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    > George Bernard Shaw
    > www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    > updated 02/20/10


    Ah. Thanks. I was more interested in the iPhone and the ability
    to print. I like having a printout that I can annotate as I cook.

    --
    Jean B.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On Sun, 28 Feb 2010 11:23:48 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was more interested in the iPhone and the ability
    > to print. I like having a printout that I can annotate as I cook.


    I annotate recipes when the computer is in the kitchen.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  20. #20
    koko Guest

    Default Re: the no-knead bread as pizza dough

    On Sun, 28 Feb 2010 11:23:48 -0500, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >koko wrote:
    >> Well, one gizmo I downloaded it to is my computer, the other is my
    >> iPhone. I just bring the recipe up on the computer or iPhone and put
    >> on the counter as I'm cooking, no need to print out.
    >>
    >> koko
    >> --
    >>
    >> There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    >> George Bernard Shaw
    >> www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    >> updated 02/20/10

    >
    >Ah. Thanks. I was more interested in the iPhone and the ability
    >to print. I like having a printout that I can annotate as I cook.


    On the iPhone with the Barnes and Noble eReader, you can add notes and
    highlight text. There is also the option to look up a word in the
    Dictionary, Google or Wikipedia.

    Pretty slick.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 02/20/10

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