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Thread: Nice chili pepper site

  1. #1
    Bryan Guest

    Default Nice chili pepper site

    I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.

    http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1

    I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. Good
    taste, but not much heat.

    --Bryan

  2. #2
    sandi Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]
    s.com:

    > I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >
    > http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >
    > I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package.
    > Good taste, but not much heat.
    >
    > --Bryan
    >


    Nice!

    Thanks

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    Bryan wrote:
    >
    > I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >
    > http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >
    > I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. Good
    > taste, but not much heat.


    That's basically what defines Japan chilis. All the flavor
    and a lot less heat. I stopped using those a long time ago
    in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.

  4. #4
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    On May 6, 8:25*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > Bryan wrote:
    >
    > > I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.

    >
    > >http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1

    >
    > > I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. *Good
    > > taste, but not much heat.

    >
    > That's basically what defines Japan chilis. *All the flavor
    > and a lot less heat. *I stopped using those a long time ago
    > in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.


    I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only ones
    I don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of
    tropical fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big
    Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going to
    put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.

    --Bryan

  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    Bryan wrote:

    > I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only ones I
    > don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of tropical
    > fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big Jims, Serranos,
    > Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going to put a few of those
    > Japanese seeds in too.


    We've planted Fresno chiles. I'm still looking for seeds to plant manzana
    chiles; it's probably not too late for them.

    Bob



  6. #6
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    Bryan wrote:
    > On May 6, 8:25 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >> Bryan wrote:
    >>
    >>> I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >>> http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >>> I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. Good
    >>> taste, but not much heat.

    >> That's basically what defines Japan chilis. All the flavor
    >> and a lot less heat. I stopped using those a long time ago
    >> in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.

    >
    > I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only ones
    > I don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of
    > tropical fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big
    > Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going to
    > put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.
    >
    > --Bryan



    If you want lots of heat without the frooty taste of habaneros, try
    Tabasco. One Tabasco plant will give you plenty of peppers for eating
    fresh, once it *finally* starts producing.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    On Fri, 06 May 2011 23:39:19 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Bryan wrote:
    >> On May 6, 8:25 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >>> Bryan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >>>> http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >>>> I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. Good
    >>>> taste, but not much heat.
    >>> That's basically what defines Japan chilis. All the flavor
    >>> and a lot less heat. I stopped using those a long time ago
    >>> in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.

    >>
    >> I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only ones
    >> I don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of
    >> tropical fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big
    >> Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going to
    >> put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.
    >>
    >> --Bryan

    >
    >
    >If you want lots of heat without the frooty taste of habaneros, try
    >Tabasco. One Tabasco plant will give you plenty of peppers for eating
    >fresh, once it *finally* starts producing.
    >
    >Bob


    If heat alone is what is desired, tabascos are a weak choice. They are
    so far down the heat levels of peppers that it would be crazy to use
    them for only that purpose if absence of taste is desired.

    The Australian Butch T. @ 1.46 million heat units

    British Naga Viper @ 1.38 million

    India's Bhut Jolokia @ 1.1 million

    California's Red Savina @ 800 thousand

    Trinidad Scorpion @ 800 thousand

    Trinidad 7-Pot @ 800 thousand

    South African Fatalii @ 500 thousand

    The Tabasco has 50 thousand scoville heat units.

  8. #8
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    On 5/7/2011 11:08 AM, Landon wrote:
    > On Fri, 06 May 2011 23:39:19 -0500, zxcvbob<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Bryan wrote:
    >>> On May 6, 8:25 pm, Mark Thorson<nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >>>> Bryan wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >>>>> http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >>>>> I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. Good
    >>>>> taste, but not much heat.
    >>>> That's basically what defines Japan chilis. All the flavor
    >>>> and a lot less heat. I stopped using those a long time ago
    >>>> in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.
    >>>
    >>> I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only ones
    >>> I don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of
    >>> tropical fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big
    >>> Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going to
    >>> put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.
    >>>
    >>> --Bryan

    >>
    >>
    >> If you want lots of heat without the frooty taste of habaneros, try
    >> Tabasco. One Tabasco plant will give you plenty of peppers for eating
    >> fresh, once it *finally* starts producing.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > If heat alone is what is desired, tabascos are a weak choice. They are
    > so far down the heat levels of peppers that it would be crazy to use
    > them for only that purpose if absence of taste is desired.
    >
    > The Australian Butch T. @ 1.46 million heat units
    >
    > British Naga Viper @ 1.38 million
    >
    > India's Bhut Jolokia @ 1.1 million
    >
    > California's Red Savina @ 800 thousand
    >
    > Trinidad Scorpion @ 800 thousand
    >
    > Trinidad 7-Pot @ 800 thousand
    >
    > South African Fatalii @ 500 thousand
    >
    > The Tabasco has 50 thousand scoville heat units.



    I said *if you don't like the taste of habaneros* fresh tabascos are a
    good choice. They have a good flavor and are hot and juicy, and they
    don't taste anything like a Capsicum chinense.

    -Bob

  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 5/7/2011 11:08 AM, Landon wrote:
    >> On Fri, 06 May 2011 23:39:19 -0500, zxcvbob<[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bryan wrote:
    >>>> On May 6, 8:25 pm, Mark Thorson<nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >>>>> Bryan wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >>>>>> http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >>>>>> I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package.

    Good
    >>>>>> taste, but not much heat.
    >>>>> That's basically what defines Japan chilis. All the flavor
    >>>>> and a lot less heat. I stopped using those a long time ago
    >>>>> in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.
    >>>>
    >>>> I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only

    ones
    >>>> I don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of
    >>>> tropical fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big
    >>>> Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going

    to
    >>>> put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.
    >>>>
    >>>> --Bryan
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> If you want lots of heat without the frooty taste of habaneros, try
    >>> Tabasco. One Tabasco plant will give you plenty of peppers for

    eating
    >>> fresh, once it *finally* starts producing.
    >>>
    >>> Bob

    >>
    >> If heat alone is what is desired, tabascos are a weak choice. They

    are
    >> so far down the heat levels of peppers that it would be crazy to use
    >> them for only that purpose if absence of taste is desired.
    >>
    >> The Australian Butch T. @ 1.46 million heat units
    >>
    >> British Naga Viper @ 1.38 million
    >>
    >> India's Bhut Jolokia @ 1.1 million
    >>
    >> California's Red Savina @ 800 thousand
    >>
    >> Trinidad Scorpion @ 800 thousand
    >>
    >> Trinidad 7-Pot @ 800 thousand
    >>
    >> South African Fatalii @ 500 thousand
    >>
    >> The Tabasco has 50 thousand scoville heat units.

    >
    >
    > I said *if you don't like the taste of habaneros* fresh tabascos are a
    > good choice. They have a good flavor and are hot and juicy, and they
    > don't taste anything like a Capsicum chinense.
    >
    > -Bob



    http://www.hothothot.com/

    A good old source of HOT chile pepper goodness.

    In Pasadena, CA., USA.

    My brother tortured me with a jar of pickled habaneros. I added a sliver
    of one to Kraft mac & cheese. Overpowered and destroyed the whole pot.

    I kept the jar in the fridge for about five years, then resignedly threw
    it away.

    Andy

  10. #10
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    On Sat, 07 May 2011 14:53:04 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 5/7/2011 11:08 AM, Landon wrote:
    >> On Fri, 06 May 2011 23:39:19 -0500, zxcvbob<[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bryan wrote:
    >>>> On May 6, 8:25 pm, Mark Thorson<nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >>>>> Bryan wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    >>>>>> http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    >>>>>> I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. Good
    >>>>>> taste, but not much heat.
    >>>>> That's basically what defines Japan chilis. All the flavor
    >>>>> and a lot less heat. I stopped using those a long time ago
    >>>>> in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.
    >>>>
    >>>> I love the taste of Arbols. Like cayennes, but better. The only ones
    >>>> I don't like much are the habanero varieties. They remind me of
    >>>> tropical fruits that I dislike. This year I've planted NuMex Big
    >>>> Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. I'm going to
    >>>> put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.
    >>>>
    >>>> --Bryan
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> If you want lots of heat without the frooty taste of habaneros, try
    >>> Tabasco. One Tabasco plant will give you plenty of peppers for eating
    >>> fresh, once it *finally* starts producing.
    >>>
    >>> Bob

    >>
    >> If heat alone is what is desired, tabascos are a weak choice. They are
    >> so far down the heat levels of peppers that it would be crazy to use
    >> them for only that purpose if absence of taste is desired.
    >>
    >> The Australian Butch T. @ 1.46 million heat units
    >>
    >> British Naga Viper @ 1.38 million
    >>
    >> India's Bhut Jolokia @ 1.1 million
    >>
    >> California's Red Savina @ 800 thousand
    >>
    >> Trinidad Scorpion @ 800 thousand
    >>
    >> Trinidad 7-Pot @ 800 thousand
    >>
    >> South African Fatalii @ 500 thousand
    >>
    >> The Tabasco has 50 thousand scoville heat units.

    >
    >
    >I said *if you don't like the taste of habaneros* fresh tabascos are a
    >good choice. They have a good flavor and are hot and juicy, and they
    >don't taste anything like a Capsicum chinense.
    >
    >-Bob


    I wasn't finding fault with what you've said Bob. Only expanding the
    information.

    I misunderstood you and thought *no flavor* was the desired effect. I
    sometimes use the very hottest peppers for just that reason.

    Some dishes have very mild flavors that are almost undetectable, but
    contribute to the over-all taste of the entire dish.

    If the precise flavor of the pepper is not already one of the desired
    tastes, then the addition of that flavor would detract from the
    over-all taste of the dish.

    While this may be agreeable to some, others may wish the dish to taste
    as intended by the author of the recipe being used.

    If spiciness is desired as an addition to that precise taste, a tiny
    bit of a very hot pepper can be used to provide that spiciness without
    affecting the flavor for most people.

  11. #11
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Nice chili pepper site

    On May 7, 4:34*pm, Landon <lan...@noreply.com> wrote:
    > On Sat, 07 May 2011 14:53:04 -0500, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >On 5/7/2011 11:08 AM, Landon wrote:
    > >> On Fri, 06 May 2011 23:39:19 -0500, zxcvbob<zxcv...@charter.net>
    > >> wrote:

    >
    > >>> Bryan wrote:
    > >>>> On May 6, 8:25 pm, Mark Thorson<nos...@sonic.net> *wrote:
    > >>>>> Bryan wrote:

    >
    > >>>>>> I found it when I was looking for info on Japanese chilies.
    > >>>>>>http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/chili.html#H1
    > >>>>>> I saw the Japanese ones at Global Foods and bought a package. *Good
    > >>>>>> taste, but not much heat.
    > >>>>> That's basically what defines Japan chilis. *All the flavor
    > >>>>> and a lot less heat. *I stopped using those a long time ago
    > >>>>> in favor of Thai and arbol chilis.

    >
    > >>>> I love the taste of Arbols. *Like cayennes, but better. *The only ones
    > >>>> I don't like much are the habanero varieties. *They remind me of
    > >>>> tropical fruits that I dislike. *This year I've planted NuMex Big
    > >>>> Jims, Serranos, Jalapenos and one Habanero for the heat. *I'm going to
    > >>>> put a few of those Japanese seeds in too.

    >
    > >>>> --Bryan

    >
    > >>> If you want lots of heat without the frooty taste of habaneros, try
    > >>> Tabasco. *One Tabasco plant will give you plenty of peppers for eating
    > >>> fresh, once it *finally* starts producing.

    >
    > >>> Bob

    >
    > >> If heat alone is what is desired, tabascos are a weak choice. They are
    > >> so far down the heat levels of peppers that it would be crazy to use
    > >> them for only that purpose if absence of taste is desired.

    >
    > >> The Australian Butch T. @ *1.46 million heat units

    >
    > >> British Naga Viper @ 1.38 million

    >
    > >> India's Bhut Jolokia @ 1.1 million

    >
    > >> California's Red Savina @ 800 thousand

    >
    > >> Trinidad Scorpion @ 800 thousand

    >
    > >> Trinidad 7-Pot @ 800 thousand

    >
    > >> South African Fatalii @ 500 thousand

    >
    > >> The Tabasco has 50 thousand scoville heat units.

    >
    > >I said *if you don't like the taste of habaneros* fresh tabascos are a
    > >good choice. *They have a good flavor and are hot and juicy, and they
    > >don't taste anything like a Capsicum chinense.

    >
    > >-Bob

    >
    > I wasn't finding fault with what you've said Bob. Only expanding the
    > information.
    >
    > I misunderstood you and thought *no flavor* was the desired effect. I
    > sometimes use the very hottest peppers for just that reason.
    >
    > Some dishes have very mild flavors that are almost undetectable, but
    > contribute to the over-all taste of the entire dish.
    >
    > If the precise flavor of the pepper is not already one of the desired
    > tastes, then the addition of that flavor would detract from the
    > over-all taste of the dish.
    >
    > While this may be agreeable to some, others may wish the dish to taste
    > as intended by the author of the recipe being used.
    >
    > If spiciness is desired as an addition to that precise taste, a tiny
    > bit of a very hot pepper can be used to provide that spiciness without
    > affecting the flavor for most people.


    For enough hot to be useful with enough taste to be joyful, I like
    pickled cherry peppers, red or green. (Fresh are great too, but harder
    to get.) They are a bit milder than jalopenos, but tastier. I don't
    put them _in_ mac&cheese, but eat them on the side.

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

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