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Thread: News papers and recipes

  1. #1
    James Silverton Guest

    Default News papers and recipes

    Hello All!

    Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    any indication that the authors have ever tested them?

    --


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  2. #2
    Gill Smith Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:LWzCk.1279$[email protected]..
    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did not
    > work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that in
    > English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without any
    > indication that the authors have ever tested them?


    An essential part of the fish & chips experience is the newspaper they're
    wrapped in.



    -_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-

    http://www.gillsmith999.plus.com/

    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_



  3. #3
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    In article <LWzCk.1279$[email protected]>,
    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    > in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    > any indication that the authors have ever tested them?


    I've successfully deep fried hundreds of pounds of potatoes at 5 minutes
    at 325f followed by 1 minute at 375f. I always tried to use Nevada and
    Idaho Russetts rather than Oregon and California spuds because they
    browned too fast because of higher sugar content. You've probably got a
    thermometer/thermostat problem.

    D.M.

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    > in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    > any indication that the authors have ever tested them?


    I have found lots of good recipes in the Toronto Star. AAMOF some of our
    family favourites came from there, like Seville Orange marmalade, Mango
    Chicken, Curried Chicken in Coconut milk and Apricot and Cilantro Chutney.

  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    Don wrote on Wed, 24 Sep 2008 17:28:18 -0700:

    >> Hello All!
    >>
    >> Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and
    >> Chips". It did not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was
    >> no sign of browning of the potatoes. Even after 10 minutes
    >> more at 425F there was not much. The pan fried fish did not
    >> taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that in
    >> English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes
    >> without any indication that the authors have ever tested
    >> them?


    > I've successfully deep fried hundreds of pounds of potatoes at
    > 5 minutes at 325f followed by 1 minute at 375f. I always tried
    > to use Nevada and Idaho Russetts rather than Oregon and
    > California spuds because they browned too fast because of
    > higher sugar content. You've probably got a
    > thermometer/thermostat problem.


    All very true but that's not what the Post was talking about: making
    fish and chips by baking the potatoes and pan frying the fish.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 23:20:11 GMT, James Silverton wrote:

    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    > in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    > any indication that the authors have ever tested them?


    i didn't see the recipe, but the *post* is normally pretty rigorous in
    testing the recipes they print.

    your pal,
    blake

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    On Sep 24, 7:20�pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, the Washington Post �had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". Itdid
    > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    > in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    > any indication that the authors have ever tested them?
    >
    > --
    >
    > James Silverton
    > Potomac, Maryland
    >
    > Email, with obvious alterations:
    > not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


    Whenever there's a recipe in the newspaper I want to try I always wait
    a week or so for the newspaper to print a correction in case there's a
    mistake in the recipe. The paper may have received the correct recipe
    but some copy editor could have misread it. There was one time where
    I saw a recipe that called for 1 to 3 cups of flour. That's quite a
    range. It was suppose to be 1/3 cup of flour.

  8. #8
    sueb Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    On Sep 25, 9:52*am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 23:20:11 GMT, James Silverton wrote:
    > > Hello All!

    >
    > > Today, the Washington Post *had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    > > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    > > in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    > > any indication that the authors have ever tested them?

    >
    > i didn't see the recipe, but the *post* is normally pretty rigorous in
    > testing the recipes they print.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    The one time I tried a recipe from the paper that failed, I emailed
    the food editor, and received a nice reply back. Might be worth a
    try....

    Susan B.

  9. #9
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    [email protected] wrote on Thu, 25 Sep 2008 10:48:32 -0700 (PDT):

    > On Sep 24, 7:20�pm, "James Silverton"
    > <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    >> Hello All!
    >>
    >> Today, the Washington Post �had a recipe for "Fish and
    >> Chips". It did not work!
    >> After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    >> potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The
    >> pan fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing
    >> like that in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such
    >> recipes without any indication that the authors have ever tested


    >Whenever there's a recipe in the newspaper I want to try I always wait
    >a week or so for the newspaper to print a correction in case there's a
    >mistake in the recipe. The paper may have received the correct recipe
    >but some copy editor could have misread it.


    That's probably a good idea. I was surprised by the oven temperature for
    the potatoes. A previous more or less successful recipe uses 20 minutes
    at 375F and then another 10 at 425F. Those are not bad but not "Chips"
    as in Fish 'n Chips and pan-fried will never produce something like
    deep-fried fish (delicious but not good for you!)
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  10. #10
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Whenever there's a recipe in the newspaper I want to try I always wait
    > a week or so for the newspaper to print a correction in case there's a
    > mistake in the recipe. The paper may have received the correct recipe
    > but some copy editor could have misread it. There was one time where
    > I saw a recipe that called for 1 to 3 cups of flour. That's quite a
    > range. It was suppose to be 1/3 cup of flour.
    >


    My newspaper had a recipe that called for 12 cups of mayonnaise. One
    week later, they printed a correction, saying it was supposed to be 1/2
    cup of mayonnaise. What a difference. lol

    Becca

  11. #11
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    On Sep 24, 4:20*pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, the Washington Post *had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much. The pan
    > fried fish did not taste bad but it was blackened and nothing like that
    > in English "Fish and Chips". How can people produce such recipes without
    > any indication that the authors have ever tested them?
    >
    > --
    >
    > James Silverton
    > Potomac, Maryland
    >
    > Email, with obvious alterations:
    > not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


    There are tons of recipes with mistakes, typos, general bad
    information...

  12. #12
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    The message
    <[email protected]>
    from merryb <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > On Sep 24, 4:20*pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    > wrote:
    > > Hello All!
    > >
    > > Today, the Washington Post *had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    > > not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    > > potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much.


    Were you cooking chips in the oven?

    Janet

  13. #13
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    Janet Baraclough wrote:
    > The message
    > <[email protected]>
    > from merryb <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >
    >
    >>On Sep 24, 4:20 pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hello All!
    >>>
    >>>Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and Chips". It did
    >>>not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there was no sign of browning of the
    >>>potatoes. Even after 10 minutes more at 425F there was not much.

    >
    >
    > Were you cooking chips in the oven?



    The directions in the Washington Post recipe have you doing exactly
    that, baking a traditonally fried food:


    http://projects.washingtonpost.com/r...ish-and-chips/


    --Lia


  14. #14
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    Julia wrote on Thu, 25 Sep 2008 17:26:27 -0400:

    > Janet Baraclough wrote:
    >> The message
    >> <[email protected]
    >> s.com> from merryb <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >>
    >>> On Sep 24, 4:20 pm, "James Silverton"
    >>> <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hello All!
    >>>>
    >>>> Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and
    >>>> Chips". It did not work! After 18 minutes at 375F, there
    >>>> was no sign of browning of the potatoes. Even after 10
    >>>> minutes more at 425F there was not much.

    >>
    >> Were you cooking chips in the oven?


    > The directions in the Washington Post recipe have you doing
    > exactly that, baking a traditonally fried food:


    > http://projects.washingtonpost.com/r...ish-and-chips/



    You might take a look at some earlier posts in this thread by myself :-)
    I suspect we concur on oven-baked "Chips".
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  15. #15
    aem Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    On Sep 25, 10:56*am, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    >
    > > On Sep 24, 7:20 pm, "James Silverton"
    > > <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    > >> Today, the Washington Post had a recipe for "Fish and
    > >> Chips". It did not work! [snips]

    >.... I was surprised by the oven temperature for
    > the potatoes. A previous more or less successful recipe uses 20 minutes
    > at 375F and then another 10 at 425F. Those are not bad but not "Chips"
    > as in Fish 'n Chips and pan-fried will never produce something like
    > deep-fried fish (delicious but not good for you!)
    > --

    I don't get the point of this post. It's plain from reading the
    recipe what you're going to get. Of course roasted potatoes and pan-
    cooked fish will not replicate deep fried fish and chips. What did
    you expect? (Frozen french fries such as by Ore-Ida come out like
    french fries because they are pre-fried before being frozen.)

    The Post column offered it as a way to introduce kids to fish in a
    supposedly more healthful version than deep fried fish and chips. For
    that purpose I'd expect it does the job. -aem

  16. #16
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: News papers and recipes

    aem wrote:
    >
    > I don't get the point of this post. It's plain from reading the
    > recipe what you're going to get.



    Not if you're a beginner. You and I have some experience in the
    kitchen. Someone reading the newspaper might not. I don't think it's
    unreasonable for someone reading a recipe for fish and chips to expect a
    result that resembles fish and chips. And fish and chips in common
    parlance always means the fried version you get in English pubs.


    Besides, the original poster said he was waiting for the fish to brown,
    and that can happen in the oven if the recipe is right.


    My only quibble with the original poster is that he should have written
    to the Washington Post.


    --Lia


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