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Thread: newbie Q WOK stand

  1. #1
    anern Guest

    Default newbie Q WOK stand

    Re-post from uk.food+drink.chinese

    Hi,
    I'm having a serious go at Chinese cooking and I'm getting a round
    bottomed wok and stand. I have a fairly standard hob (whirlpool AKG
    085/BR/02). The local shops only have light wire stands that would move
    about on top of the Grating and to not provide enough clearance above the
    burner of the grating were removed (The bottom of the WOK touches the
    burner). The cooking shop I went to locally indicated that this stand was
    just for storing the wok not cooking with but the local Chinese supermarket
    seemed to imply this was OK (though there were some communication problems
    here so I may have misunderstood) and so does http://www.londonwok.com/,
    though I have to say it all looks a little fragile to me. Ideally, the stand
    would sit directly on the hob, allowing the wok to be as close to the flame
    as possible. This must be a common problem - anyone point me at a solution ?

    The burner protrudes 33mm from the base of the HOB, I am also purchasing
    a new wok.

    Also, The largest burner on the HOB is rated at 3000W (nominal). Is this
    powerful enough to give the wok hai flavour ?

    Cheers for any help,

    Bruce.




  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: newbie Q WOK stand

    On Jul 22, 8:52*am, "anern" <a...@aner.anern> wrote:
    > Re-post from uk.food+drink.chinese
    >
    > Hi,
    > * * I'm having a serious go at Chinese cooking and I'm getting a round
    > bottomed wok and stand. I have a fairly standard hob (whirlpool AKG
    > 085/BR/02). The local shops only have light wire stands that would move
    > about on top of the Grating and to not provide enough clearance above the
    > burner of the grating were removed (The bottom of the WOK touches the
    > burner). The cooking shop I went to locally indicated that this stand was
    > just for storing the wok not cooking with but the local Chinese supermarket
    > seemed to imply this was OK (though there were some communication problems
    > here so I may have misunderstood) and so doeshttp://www.londonwok.com/,
    > though I have to say it all looks a little fragile to me. Ideally, the stand
    > would sit directly on the hob, allowing the wok to be as close to the flame
    > as possible. This must be a common problem - anyone point me at a solution ?
    >
    > * * The burner protrudes 33mm from the base of the HOB, I am also purchasing
    > a new wok.
    >
    > * * Also, The largest burner on the HOB is rated at 3000W (nominal). Is this
    > powerful enough to give the wok hai flavour ?
    >

    I hope you're getting the carbon steel wok. Avoid the stainless and
    the nonstick. Either round or flat bottom will work. Round bottom is
    more traditional and facilitates stirfrying but flat bottom is more
    stable and usually sits closer to the heat source, hence gets hotter.
    Either the steel or wire stand will work, assuming the wire version is
    sturdy enough to support the wok when it is loaded with soup or deep
    frying oil. Position it so that the larger diameter side is up, if
    your burner configuration will allow it. This will put the wok
    slightly closer to the flame.

    The home stove burner will not produce the kind of flame that a
    commercial kitchen uses both in btu's and in terms of how deeply into
    the flame the wok sits. You will find it difficult to achieve 'wok
    hai' but it is possible, at least some of the time. Once the wok is
    well-seasoned, give it plenty of preheating time -- wisps of smoke
    should begin to appear before you put anything into it. Then do not
    overload it, as the larger the quantity you put in the more it will
    cool it down. For a typical 14" wok, no more than 1 pound of chicken
    or 12 ounces of beef at a time is what Grace Young recommends in "The
    Breath of a Wok," which I highly recommend to you. It's better to
    stirfry in batches if that's the only way to keep the heat up. In a
    meat and veggie stirfry I will usually do the veggies first, remove
    them, let the wok reheat well, then do the meat, construct the sauce
    if that's called for, and then add the veggies back to finish.

    One more tip: when you put meat in for a stirfry, don't begin
    stirring/tossing immediately. Put the (well-drained) meat in all in
    one layer to the extent possible and let it sear briefly before you
    begin moving it around. That will maximize your chances of getting
    that elusive 'wok hay.' -aem



  3. #3
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: newbie Q WOK stand

    anern wrote:

    > Re-post from uk.food+drink.chinese
    >
    > Hi,
    > I'm having a serious go at Chinese cooking and I'm getting a round
    > bottomed wok and stand.


    Round bottomed woks make the wokkin' world go 'round.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  4. #4
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: newbie Q WOK stand

    On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 16:52:13 +0100, "anern" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Re-post from uk.food+drink.chinese
    >
    >Hi,
    > I'm having a serious go at Chinese cooking and I'm getting a round
    >bottomed wok and stand. I have a fairly standard hob (whirlpool AKG
    >085/BR/02). The local shops only have light wire stands that would move
    >about on top of the Grating and to not provide enough clearance above the
    >burner of the grating were removed (The bottom of the WOK touches the
    >burner). The cooking shop I went to locally indicated that this stand was
    >just for storing the wok not cooking with but the local Chinese supermarket
    >seemed to imply this was OK (though there were some communication problems
    >here so I may have misunderstood) and so does http://www.londonwok.com/,
    >though I have to say it all looks a little fragile to me. Ideally, the stand
    >would sit directly on the hob, allowing the wok to be as close to the flame
    >as possible. This must be a common problem - anyone point me at a solution ?
    >
    > The burner protrudes 33mm from the base of the HOB, I am also purchasing
    >a new wok.
    >
    > Also, The largest burner on the HOB is rated at 3000W (nominal). Is this
    >powerful enough to give the wok hai flavour ?
    >
    >Cheers for any help,
    >
    >Bruce.
    >


    this talk of wire is a little confusing to me. a standard wok ring
    looks like this:

    <http://www.amazon.com/Wok-Ring/dp/B00012F3X6>

    ....and is used on a gas stove. if you have electric burners, use of a
    round-bottomed wok is pretty much doomed to failure. try a carbon
    steel flat-bottom:

    <http://importfood.com/cwrk3201.html>

    ....which some people will say is doomed to failure also. i think it
    can be used with moderate success, but it won't get as hot as a wok
    with gas, and you can't change temperatures as quickly.

    there's a discussion of round vs. flat here:

    <http://www.thaifoodandtravel.com/features/woktype.html>

    but i'm not sure how useful it is.

    good luck in any case.

    your pal,
    blake


    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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