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Thread: newb question

  1. #1
    tvor Guest

    Default newb question

    Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and it
    turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.

    any comments would be appreciated.

    thanks

    Rich



  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    On Wed 10 Sep 2008 06:32:35a, tvor told us...

    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took
    > the bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with
    > some carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained
    > it and it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a
    > gelatinous texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it
    > liquefied almost immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put
    > me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich


    The gelatinous texture is from the bones and is characteristic of a good
    stock, as opposed to broth which does not have this characteristic.



    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Wednesday, 09(IX)/10(X)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    8wks 5dys 17hrs 28mins
    *******************************************
    Welcome back to square one.
    *******************************************


  3. #3
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    tvor wrote:

    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and it
    > turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.


    It's normal for stock made from chicken bones to gel when cooled. The
    last time I made stock I used a whole stewing hen I'd gotten on sale.
    Hacked it up, simmered it with some aromatics then strained it and put
    it into the fridge to chill so I could lift off the congealed fat.

    My kids found it and were grossing each other out, poking at the layer
    of yellow fat and the gelled stock beneath it. They certainly wolfed
    down the chicken noodle soup I made with it later in the day, though.


  4. #4
    George Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    tvor wrote:
    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and it
    > turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich
    >
    >

    Thats exactly how real chicken stock is supposed to be.

  5. #5
    tvor Guest

    Default Re: newb question


    "tvor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]..
    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and
    > it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich
    >



    Thank You all!!!



  6. #6
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    tvor wrote:
    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took
    > the bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them
    > with some carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I
    > strained it and it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the
    > fridge it had a gelatinous texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes
    > fine, and it liquefied almost immediately in a warm pan but the
    > initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich



    It means you made good stock

    Jill

  7. #7
    mom peagram Guest

    Default Re: newb question


    "tvor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]..
    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and
    > it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich

    That's normal.


    --
    mompeagram
    FERGUS/HARLINGEN


  8. #8
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: newb question


    "tvor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]..
    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and
    > it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich



    Good Stuff Maynard.

    You done good.

    (normal for good stock)


    Dimitri


  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    tvor wrote:

    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock


    We all know what comes next, right?

    Yes, it turns into Jell-O. It's the #`1 question about chicken
    stock here over the years.

    I guess this freaks out people who are used to using chicken stock
    from a can.

    -sw

  10. #10
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    "tvor" <[email protected]> news:48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]: in
    rec.food.cooking

    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took
    > the bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them
    > with some carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I
    > strained it and it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge
    > it had a gelatinous texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine,
    > and it liquefied almost immediately in a warm pan but the initial
    > texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.


    That is normal... if you are making stock that is. If you were making
    broth, that is another story. My first attempt at stock was successful
    too but I didn't know it. I thought I'd made a savory kind of Jell-O or
    worse. It was delicious in the recipes I used it in. It's easy to freeze
    too. I put about 1/2 batch of stock in ice cube trays to use for small
    portions and the quart containers for other uses. Good stuff. Congrats
    on your first chicken stock experience. What herbs/spices did you put in
    it... if any?

    Michael


    --
    "Their [the waiters'] eyes sparkled and their pencils flew as she
    proceeded to eviscerate my wallet - pate, Whitstable oysters, a sole,
    filet mignon, and a favorite salad of the Nizam of Hyderabad made of
    shredded five-pound notes."
    ~S. J. Perelman, The Rising Gorge (1961)

    Find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  11. #11
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> news:ga8scs$p75$2
    @registered.motzarella.org: in rec.food.cooking

    > tvor wrote:
    >
    >> Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock

    >
    > We all know what comes next, right?
    >
    > Yes, it turns into Jell-O. It's the #`1 question about chicken
    > stock here over the years.
    >
    > I guess this freaks out people who are used to using chicken stock
    > from a can.


    I know it freaked me out. Gawd... that was 30 years ago. Back then I was
    lucky to know what stock even was

    Michael

    --
    "Their [the waiters'] eyes sparkled and their pencils flew as she proceeded
    to eviscerate my wallet - pate, Whitstable oysters, a sole, filet mignon,
    and a favorite salad of the Nizam of Hyderabad made of shredded five-pound
    notes."
    ~S. J. Perelman, The Rising Gorge (1961)

    Find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  12. #12
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    "tvor" wrote

    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and
    > it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.


    Perfect. Means you got all the good stuff from the bones and joints in
    there. Calcium, natural chronditrin, etc. People with arthritis used to be
    told to eat more chicken and other bone soups for this reason but the canned
    stocks are missing this part.



  13. #13
    tvor Guest

    Default Re: newb question


    "Michael "Dog3"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    > "tvor" <[email protected]> news:48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]: in
    > rec.food.cooking
    >
    >> Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took
    >> the bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them
    >> with some carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I
    >> strained it and it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge
    >> it had a gelatinous texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine,
    >> and it liquefied almost immediately in a warm pan but the initial
    >> texture put me off a bit.
    >>
    >> any comments would be appreciated.

    >
    > That is normal... if you are making stock that is. If you were making
    > broth, that is another story. My first attempt at stock was successful
    > too but I didn't know it. I thought I'd made a savory kind of Jell-O or
    > worse. It was delicious in the recipes I used it in. It's easy to freeze
    > too. I put about 1/2 batch of stock in ice cube trays to use for small
    > portions and the quart containers for other uses. Good stuff. Congrats
    > on your first chicken stock experience. What herbs/spices did you put in
    > it... if any?
    >
    > Michael
    >
    >


    I added onion, celery (including the leafy ends), carrots, fresh sage,
    cracked pepper and salt. I had the sage left over from my first home-made
    pasta experiment: roasted butternut squash ravioli with sage butter sauce.
    That turned out pretty good too.

    That butter sage sauce really added a nice aroma to the whole house. My
    kind of aroma therapy.

    stupid question about the ice-cube trays, but, once you use them for
    freezing stock, does this flavor "stain" the trays or can you still use them
    to make ice cubes?

    Rich


    > --
    > "Their [the waiters'] eyes sparkled and their pencils flew as she
    > proceeded to eviscerate my wallet - pate, Whitstable oysters, a sole,
    > filet mignon, and a favorite salad of the Nizam of Hyderabad made of
    > shredded five-pound notes."
    > ~S. J. Perelman, The Rising Gorge (1961)
    >
    > Find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com




  14. #14
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > tvor wrote:
    >
    >> Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock

    >
    > We all know what comes next, right?
    >
    > Yes, it turns into Jell-O. It's the #`1 question about chicken
    > stock here over the years.
    >
    > I guess this freaks out people who are used to using chicken stock
    > from a can.
    >
    > -sw


    The canned stuff isn't "chicken stock". It's broth. My mother used to make
    chicken broth from bone-in (not boneless) chicken breasts when she made
    creamed chicken to serve over biscuits. Even with the bones it wasn't
    cooked nearly long enough for it to turn into good stock. She'd simmer them
    maybe an hour. She never claimed to be a good cook She told me just the
    other day "I did what I had to" LOL

    Jill


  15. #15
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    tvor wrote:


    >
    > stupid question about the ice-cube trays, but, once you use them for
    > freezing stock, does this flavor "stain" the trays or can you still use them
    > to make ice cubes?


    In my experience, yeah, it does leave a chickeny taste in a plastic ice
    cube tray, even after running it through the dishwasher. Either set
    aside a special set of ice cube trays for freezing stock exclusively, or
    measure your stock into ziplock freezer bags, seal them up and freeze
    them. Seems like I never wind up using less than a cup of stock anyhow.


  16. #16
    tvor Guest

    Default Re: newb question


    "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Q6Qxk.19$[email protected]..
    > tvor wrote:
    >
    >> Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    >> bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    >> carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and
    >> it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a
    >> gelatinous texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it
    >> liquefied almost immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me
    >> off a bit.
    >>
    >> any comments would be appreciated.

    >
    > It's normal for stock made from chicken bones to gel when cooled. The
    > last time I made stock I used a whole stewing hen I'd gotten on sale.
    > Hacked it up, simmered it with some aromatics then strained it and put it
    > into the fridge to chill so I could lift off the congealed fat.
    >
    > My kids found it and were grossing each other out, poking at the layer of
    > yellow fat and the gelled stock beneath it. They certainly wolfed down
    > the chicken noodle soup I made with it later in the day, though.
    >


    I have to hide it from my wife. She gets the heebie jeebies and will refuse
    to eat some foods if she sees how it's prepared regardless of the taste.



  17. #17
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    Kathleen wrote:
    > tvor wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> stupid question about the ice-cube trays, but, once you use them for
    >> freezing stock, does this flavor "stain" the trays or can you still
    >> use them to make ice cubes?

    >
    > In my experience, yeah, it does leave a chickeny taste in a plastic
    > ice cube tray, even after running it through the dishwasher. Either
    > set aside a special set of ice cube trays for freezing stock
    > exclusively, or measure your stock into ziplock freezer bags, seal
    > them up and freeze them. Seems like I never wind up using less than
    > a cup of stock anyhow.


    Granted I've never done the ice cube tray thing for stock but I find freezer
    containers (rather than bags) make more sense than trying to freeze liquid
    in a bag. At the very least, they're stackable

    Jill


  18. #18
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    In article <48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]>,
    "tvor" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and it
    > turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >
    > any comments would be appreciated.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Rich


    Normal. Edible if it tastes good (all that sage, y'know). Don't worry.
    Enjoy.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
    on "A Prairie Home Companion," <http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
    programs/2008/08/30/>

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: newb question

    In article <48c80fa7$0$89866$[email protected]>,
    "tvor" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > stupid question about the ice-cube trays, but, once you use them for
    > freezing stock, does this flavor "stain" the trays or can you still use them
    > to make ice cubes?
    >
    > Rich


    Shoot, give it a try and decide. You've nothing to waste but a cup of
    cold water.

  20. #20
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: newb question


    "tvor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:48c7cb5e$0$89384$[email protected]..
    > Hello, I am new here and have a question about chicken stock. I took the
    > bones of one of those deli rotisserie chickens and boiled them with some
    > carrots, celery, onion and fresh sage to make a stock. I strained it and
    > it turned out fine but when I chilled it in the fridge it had a gelatinous
    > texture (like a runny jell-o). It tastes fine, and it liquefied almost
    > immediately in a warm pan but the initial texture put me off a bit.
    >


    Rich, this happens any time you use bones in stock. I actually prefer my
    stock to be liquid when chilled, and so sometimes make it with just meat and
    skin, no bones. It works well but is more expensive.

    The stuff made with bones is more nutritious, and a good way to make use of
    the bones. It tastes fine too. But sometimes, it grosses me out!



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