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Thread: New Tagine

  1. #1
    koko Guest

    Default New Tagine


    Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    make my first tagine meal.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/

    I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    I'm going to serve this with couscous.

    Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    along but that's the plan so far.

    Pic's to follow

    koko
    --

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 10/11/10
    Watkins natural spices
    www.apinchofspices.com


  2. #2
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    koko wrote:
    > Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    > make my first tagine meal.
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >
    > I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    > some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    > almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    > For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    > I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >
    > Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    > along but that's the plan so far.
    >
    > Pic's to follow
    >


    Good luck! I have not had much luck cooking with them even with guidance
    from my in-laws. You have to heat them up slowly and they burn very
    easily. A diffuser will be necessary if using an electric stove. They
    don't sear meat very well either, but I find that Moroccans don't really
    care about searing meat. More times than I can count I have seen my
    inlaws just dump everything in the pot.


    As for your recipe, I make chicken with olives often. It's a staple in
    my house. We like to add frozen peas and potato wedges. Or we make
    french fries. I never add almonds or pine nuts to chicken tagines. But
    that doesn't mean you can't.

    Looking forward to seeing the pictures from your first attempt!

    Tracy

  3. #3
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 14:43:04 -0700, koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    >make my first tagine meal.
    >http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >
    >I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    >some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    >almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    > For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    >I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >
    >Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    >along but that's the plan so far.
    >
    >Pic's to follow
    >
    >koko


    Well, I posted earlier, but my connection seems weird. ANyway, that
    seems to be a "soft" tagine, which means not to be on the stove top.
    I have one made in portugal. I load it and start from a cold oven,
    then never wash in the DW, but do by hand, no soap. The surface will
    develop cracks (in the glaze) which is OK. The flavours of each dish
    you cook will get through the cracks into the underlying clay. This is
    good. It's a form of curing.

    The stove top thing comes from the fact that in North Africa, they do
    cook on "stove top" but these are basically charcoal fired hibachis.

    The soft tagines will live longer in the oven.

    You should check out memschmel, or chicken with preserved lemons,
    olives and so on. It's a classic, and I think that may be what you're
    making. I love lamb with okra and olives, flavored with ba'harat
    seasoning.

    Congratulations on your buy, Koko, and I hope it turns out to meet
    your expectations. We love all four of ours. One is an Emil Henry,
    which will cook on a gas stove top, though I don't do that!

    Oh! I hope the one you got was actually for cooking! Some are only for
    presentation at table. I think you got a cooker....

    Alex


  4. #4
    koko Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 20:01:33 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >koko wrote:
    >> Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    >> make my first tagine meal.
    >> http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >>
    >> I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    >> some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    >> almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    >> For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    >> I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >>
    >> Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    >> along but that's the plan so far.
    >>
    >> Pic's to follow
    >>

    >
    >Good luck! I have not had much luck cooking with them even with guidance
    >from my in-laws. You have to heat them up slowly and they burn very
    >easily. A diffuser will be necessary if using an electric stove. They
    >don't sear meat very well either, but I find that Moroccans don't really
    >care about searing meat. More times than I can count I have seen my
    >inlaws just dump everything in the pot.
    >
    >
    >As for your recipe, I make chicken with olives often. It's a staple in
    >my house. We like to add frozen peas and potato wedges. Or we make
    >french fries. I never add almonds or pine nuts to chicken tagines. But
    >that doesn't mean you can't.
    >
    >Looking forward to seeing the pictures from your first attempt!
    >
    >Tracy


    I haven't gone through the pictures yet but everything turned out
    great. I'll try and get them up tomorrow.

    I lightly browned the chicken, added the rest of the ingredients and
    let it simmer away.
    I have an electric stove and didn't use a diffuser and it was fine,
    nothing burned.

    I put the tagine on a cold burner and slowly brought the temperature
    up. When I added the rest of the ingredients I lowered the heat to a
    simmer.
    I was thinking of adding some potatoes but I decided to served it with
    couscous. I wish now I would have gone with the potatoes because the
    broth is absolutely delicious.

    Sorry Tracy that you haven't had good experiences with tagine cooking.
    koko
    --

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 10/11/10
    Watkins natural spices
    www.apinchofspices.com


  5. #5
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 19:33:28 -0700, koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    ..
    >I put the tagine on a cold burner and slowly brought the temperature
    >up. When I added the rest of the ingredients I lowered the heat to a
    >simmer.
    >I was thinking of adding some potatoes but I decided to served it with
    >couscous. I wish now I would have gone with the potatoes because the
    >broth is absolutely delicious.
    >
    >Sorry Tracy that you haven't had good experiences with tagine cooking.
    >koko


    When I get back up to the bay area probably in November, to get some
    stuff from my PODS, one of the things I will be bringing back are
    cookbooks.. And one of those cookbooks is the newest Paula Wolfert
    one, Claypot Cooking. Paula is a master of tagine cooking and I seem
    to remember quite a few tagines in that book. I could be wrong on
    that, but I doubt it. I will have to see what is in there... and if
    you want to check out the recipes too, you would be most welcome.

    I don't have any clay pots or tagines myself..so guess I will have to
    make any of those recipes in my Le Crueset or other pots.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    koko wrote:
    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 20:01:33 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> koko wrote:
    >>> Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    >>> make my first tagine meal.
    >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >>>
    >>> I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    >>> some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    >>> almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    >>> For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    >>> I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >>>
    >>> Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    >>> along but that's the plan so far.
    >>>
    >>> Pic's to follow
    >>>

    >> Good luck! I have not had much luck cooking with them even with guidance
    >>from my in-laws. You have to heat them up slowly and they burn very
    >> easily. A diffuser will be necessary if using an electric stove. They
    >> don't sear meat very well either, but I find that Moroccans don't really
    >> care about searing meat. More times than I can count I have seen my
    >> inlaws just dump everything in the pot.
    >>
    >>
    >> As for your recipe, I make chicken with olives often. It's a staple in
    >> my house. We like to add frozen peas and potato wedges. Or we make
    >> french fries. I never add almonds or pine nuts to chicken tagines. But
    >> that doesn't mean you can't.
    >>
    >> Looking forward to seeing the pictures from your first attempt!
    >>
    >> Tracy

    >
    > I haven't gone through the pictures yet but everything turned out
    > great. I'll try and get them up tomorrow.
    >
    > I lightly browned the chicken, added the rest of the ingredients and
    > let it simmer away.
    > I have an electric stove and didn't use a diffuser and it was fine,
    > nothing burned.
    >
    > I put the tagine on a cold burner and slowly brought the temperature
    > up. When I added the rest of the ingredients I lowered the heat to a
    > simmer.
    > I was thinking of adding some potatoes but I decided to served it with
    > couscous. I wish now I would have gone with the potatoes because the
    > broth is absolutely delicious.
    >
    > Sorry Tracy that you haven't had good experiences with tagine cooking.
    > koko
    > --
    >


    Well, I haven't completely given up. My husband is the one who really
    keeps at it. He's the Moroccan who wants to do things the old fashioned
    way.

    Definitely make a tagine with potatoes. The soak up all the flavors and
    are so good!

    I've got chicken thighs in the fridge so I think chicken tagine may be
    on the menu tomorrow for dinner. Maybe I'll drag the real tagine out
    again for another try and pictures.


    Tracy

  7. #7
    koko Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 23:26:24 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >koko wrote:
    >> On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 20:01:33 -0400, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> koko wrote:
    >>>> Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    >>>> make my first tagine meal.
    >>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >>>>
    >>>> I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    >>>> some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    >>>> almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    >>>> For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    >>>> I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >>>>
    >>>> Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    >>>> along but that's the plan so far.
    >>>>
    >>>> Pic's to follow
    >>>>
    >>> Good luck! I have not had much luck cooking with them even with guidance
    >>>from my in-laws. You have to heat them up slowly and they burn very
    >>> easily. A diffuser will be necessary if using an electric stove. They
    >>> don't sear meat very well either, but I find that Moroccans don't really
    >>> care about searing meat. More times than I can count I have seen my
    >>> inlaws just dump everything in the pot.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> As for your recipe, I make chicken with olives often. It's a staple in
    >>> my house. We like to add frozen peas and potato wedges. Or we make
    >>> french fries. I never add almonds or pine nuts to chicken tagines. But
    >>> that doesn't mean you can't.
    >>>
    >>> Looking forward to seeing the pictures from your first attempt!
    >>>
    >>> Tracy

    >>
    >> I haven't gone through the pictures yet but everything turned out
    >> great. I'll try and get them up tomorrow.
    >>
    >> I lightly browned the chicken, added the rest of the ingredients and
    >> let it simmer away.
    >> I have an electric stove and didn't use a diffuser and it was fine,
    >> nothing burned.
    >>
    >> I put the tagine on a cold burner and slowly brought the temperature
    >> up. When I added the rest of the ingredients I lowered the heat to a
    >> simmer.
    >> I was thinking of adding some potatoes but I decided to served it with
    >> couscous. I wish now I would have gone with the potatoes because the
    >> broth is absolutely delicious.
    >>
    >> Sorry Tracy that you haven't had good experiences with tagine cooking.
    >> koko
    >> --
    >>

    >
    >Well, I haven't completely given up. My husband is the one who really
    >keeps at it. He's the Moroccan who wants to do things the old fashioned
    >way.
    >
    >Definitely make a tagine with potatoes. The soak up all the flavors and
    >are so good!
    >
    >I've got chicken thighs in the fridge so I think chicken tagine may be
    >on the menu tomorrow for dinner. Maybe I'll drag the real tagine out
    >again for another try and pictures.
    >
    >
    >Tracy


    I hope you do Tracy, I'd hate to have you miss out on it.
    I hope this wasn't just beginners luck and that I'll have other
    wonderful meals from the tagine.

    koko
    --

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 10/11/10
    Watkins natural spices
    www.apinchofspices.com


  8. #8
    koko Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 21:05:03 -0500, Chemiker
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 14:43:04 -0700, koko <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    >>make my first tagine meal.
    >>http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >>
    >>I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    >>some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    >>almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    >> For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    >>I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >>
    >>Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    >>along but that's the plan so far.
    >>
    >>Pic's to follow
    >>
    >>koko

    >
    >Well, I posted earlier, but my connection seems weird. ANyway, that
    >seems to be a "soft" tagine, which means not to be on the stove top.
    >I have one made in portugal. I load it and start from a cold oven,
    >then never wash in the DW, but do by hand, no soap. The surface will
    >develop cracks (in the glaze) which is OK. The flavours of each dish
    >you cook will get through the cracks into the underlying clay. This is
    >good. It's a form of curing.
    >
    >The stove top thing comes from the fact that in North Africa, they do
    >cook on "stove top" but these are basically charcoal fired hibachis.
    >
    >The soft tagines will live longer in the oven.
    >
    >You should check out memschmel, or chicken with preserved lemons,
    >olives and so on. It's a classic, and I think that may be what you're
    >making. I love lamb with okra and olives, flavored with ba'harat
    >seasoning.
    >
    >Congratulations on your buy, Koko, and I hope it turns out to meet
    >your expectations. We love all four of ours. One is an Emil Henry,
    >which will cook on a gas stove top, though I don't do that!
    >
    >Oh! I hope the one you got was actually for cooking! Some are only for
    >presentation at table. I think you got a cooker....
    >
    >Alex


    Thanks Alex for your help. Before I bought it I made sure it was
    suited for both stove top and oven.

    koko
    --

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com
    updated 10/11/10
    Watkins natural spices
    www.apinchofspices.com


  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine


    "koko" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    > make my first tagine meal.


    > I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using> some
    > onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    > almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.


    I've been given one recently and looked up some recipes. I just don't
    remember what was in the ones I ate in Morocco. Pigeon I remember, chicken,
    some kinds of meat, and there was no browning involved. The restaurants I
    recall in the mountains had a series of tagines lined up on a counter facing
    the street. You lifted the top to see what was in there raw and ready to
    cook. You picked yours and they told you when to come back to be served.



  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 09:00:18 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I've been given one recently and looked up some recipes.


    *Given*? Lucky you! If I ever got one, I'd have to be the one to buy
    it.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  11. #11
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: New Tagine



    On 10/13/2010 11:57 PM, koko wrote:
    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 23:26:24 -0400, Tracy<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> koko wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 20:01:33 -0400, Tracy<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> koko wrote:
    >>>>> Last weekend I bought a tagine. I cured it yesterday and tonight I'll
    >>>>> make my first tagine meal.
    >>>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/koko181...7625033651733/
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have chicken defrosted and waiting to go. I'm thinking about using
    >>>>> some onion, garlic, preserved lemons and maybe some pine nuts or
    >>>>> almonds, haven't decided yet, and some green olives.
    >>>>> For the spices I'm thinking about ginger and paprika.
    >>>>> I'm going to serve this with couscous.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Who knows what I'll end up with and what changes I'll make as I go
    >>>>> along but that's the plan so far.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Pic's to follow
    >>>>>
    >>>> Good luck! I have not had much luck cooking with them even with guidance
    >>> >from my in-laws. You have to heat them up slowly and they burn very
    >>>> easily. A diffuser will be necessary if using an electric stove. They
    >>>> don't sear meat very well either, but I find that Moroccans don't really
    >>>> care about searing meat. More times than I can count I have seen my
    >>>> inlaws just dump everything in the pot.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> As for your recipe, I make chicken with olives often. It's a staple in
    >>>> my house. We like to add frozen peas and potato wedges. Or we make
    >>>> french fries. I never add almonds or pine nuts to chicken tagines. But
    >>>> that doesn't mean you can't.
    >>>>
    >>>> Looking forward to seeing the pictures from your first attempt!
    >>>>
    >>>> Tracy
    >>>
    >>> I haven't gone through the pictures yet but everything turned out
    >>> great. I'll try and get them up tomorrow.
    >>>
    >>> I lightly browned the chicken, added the rest of the ingredients and
    >>> let it simmer away.
    >>> I have an electric stove and didn't use a diffuser and it was fine,
    >>> nothing burned.
    >>>
    >>> I put the tagine on a cold burner and slowly brought the temperature
    >>> up. When I added the rest of the ingredients I lowered the heat to a
    >>> simmer.
    >>> I was thinking of adding some potatoes but I decided to served it with
    >>> couscous. I wish now I would have gone with the potatoes because the
    >>> broth is absolutely delicious.
    >>>
    >>> Sorry Tracy that you haven't had good experiences with tagine cooking.
    >>> koko
    >>> --
    >>>

    >>
    >> Well, I haven't completely given up. My husband is the one who really
    >> keeps at it. He's the Moroccan who wants to do things the old fashioned
    >> way.
    >>
    >> Definitely make a tagine with potatoes. The soak up all the flavors and
    >> are so good!
    >>
    >> I've got chicken thighs in the fridge so I think chicken tagine may be
    >> on the menu tomorrow for dinner. Maybe I'll drag the real tagine out
    >> again for another try and pictures.
    >>
    >>
    >> Tracy

    >
    > I hope you do Tracy, I'd hate to have you miss out on it.
    > I hope this wasn't just beginners luck and that I'll have other
    > wonderful meals from the tagine.
    >


    Well, I don't think I am really missing out on anything because we
    eat a lot of Moroccan food around here. ;-) Using the tagine would
    be nice but only in the sense that it is neat to use such a
    traditional dish.

    Tracy

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