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Thread: New Recipe

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default New Recipe

    Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    *amazing*

    Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    Categories: meats and poultry
    Yield: 2 servings

    2 tb butter
    1/4 c shallots; chopped
    1 ts brown sugar; packed
    1 c chicken broth
    1 1/4 c beef broth
    1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    1/4 c whipping cream
    2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    -about 1 inch thick
    fresh chives

    Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    ahead. Cover; chill.)

    Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    taste with salt and pepper.

    Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    with chives.

    Contributor: Bon Appetit

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  2. #2
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    > *amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    > Categories: meats and poultry
    > Yield: 2 servings
    >
    > 2 tb butter
    > 1/4 c shallots; chopped
    > 1 ts brown sugar; packed
    > 1 c chicken broth
    > 1 1/4 c beef broth
    > 1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    > 1/4 c whipping cream
    > 2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    > -about 1 inch thick
    > fresh chives
    >
    > Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    > shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    > min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    > reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    > ahead. Cover; chill.)
    >
    > Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    > skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    > about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    > to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    > taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    > with chives.
    >
    > Contributor: Bon Appetit
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    If we can ever afford beef again, this sounds fabulous! Snipped and saved.
    Thanks, Terry.

    kili



  3. #3
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    > *amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    > Categories: meats and poultry
    > Yield: 2 servings
    >
    > 2 tb butter
    > 1/4 c shallots; chopped
    > 1 ts brown sugar; packed
    > 1 c chicken broth
    > 1 1/4 c beef broth
    > 1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    > 1/4 c whipping cream
    > 2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    > -about 1 inch thick
    > fresh chives
    >
    > Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    > shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    > min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    > reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    > ahead. Cover; chill.)
    >
    > Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    > skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    > about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    > to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    > taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    > with chives.
    >
    > Contributor: Bon Appetit
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    If we can ever afford beef again, this sounds fabulous! Snipped and saved.
    Thanks, Terry.

    kili



  4. #4
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    > *amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    > Categories: meats and poultry
    > Yield: 2 servings
    >
    > 2 tb butter
    > 1/4 c shallots; chopped
    > 1 ts brown sugar; packed
    > 1 c chicken broth
    > 1 1/4 c beef broth
    > 1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    > 1/4 c whipping cream
    > 2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    > -about 1 inch thick
    > fresh chives
    >
    > Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    > shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    > min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    > reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    > ahead. Cover; chill.)
    >
    > Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    > skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    > about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    > to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    > taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    > with chives.
    >


    Sounds like a keeper!

    gloria p
    >


  5. #5
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    > *amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    > Categories: meats and poultry
    > Yield: 2 servings
    >
    > 2 tb butter
    > 1/4 c shallots; chopped
    > 1 ts brown sugar; packed
    > 1 c chicken broth
    > 1 1/4 c beef broth
    > 1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    > 1/4 c whipping cream
    > 2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    > -about 1 inch thick
    > fresh chives
    >
    > Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    > shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    > min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    > reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    > ahead. Cover; chill.)
    >
    > Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    > skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    > about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    > to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    > taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    > with chives.
    >


    Sounds like a keeper!

    gloria p
    >


  6. #6
    Jo Anne Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Sat, 31 May 2008 19:41:44 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    >*amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce


    I have a similar recipe for peppercorn encrusted beef tenderloin with
    brandied cream sauce.

    I made it once as per the recipe, but the next time I wanted to have
    it I didn't have any brandy and was too cheap to buy any. So I used
    ordinary sweet sherry.

    It was fantastic - even better than with the brandy.

    Jo Anne

  7. #7
    Jo Anne Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Sat, 31 May 2008 19:41:44 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    >*amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce


    I have a similar recipe for peppercorn encrusted beef tenderloin with
    brandied cream sauce.

    I made it once as per the recipe, but the next time I wanted to have
    it I didn't have any brandy and was too cheap to buy any. So I used
    ordinary sweet sherry.

    It was fantastic - even better than with the brandy.

    Jo Anne

  8. #8
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe


    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    > *amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    > Categories: meats and poultry
    > Yield: 2 servings
    >
    > 2 tb butter
    > 1/4 c shallots; chopped
    > 1 ts brown sugar; packed
    > 1 c chicken broth
    > 1 1/4 c beef broth
    > 1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    > 1/4 c whipping cream
    > 2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    > -about 1 inch thick
    > fresh chives
    >
    > Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    > shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    > min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    > reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    > ahead. Cover; chill.)
    >
    > Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    > skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    > about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    > to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    > taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    > with chives.
    >
    > Contributor: Bon Appetit
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"



    Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and cognac
    would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the broth to overcome
    or balance the sweet?

    Thanks


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  9. #9
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe


    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Just made this for the first time for dinner tonight and it was
    > *amazing*
    >
    > Title: Beef Medallions With Cognac Sauce
    > Categories: meats and poultry
    > Yield: 2 servings
    >
    > 2 tb butter
    > 1/4 c shallots; chopped
    > 1 ts brown sugar; packed
    > 1 c chicken broth
    > 1 1/4 c beef broth
    > 1/2 c Cognac or brandy
    > 1/4 c whipping cream
    > 2 4 - 5 oz. beef tenderloins;
    > -about 1 inch thick
    > fresh chives
    >
    > Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add
    > shallots and saute until tender, about 4 mins. Add brown sugar; stir 1
    > min. Add chicken broth, beef broth and Cognac. Simmer until sauce is
    > reduced to 1/2 Cup, about 20 mins. Add cream. (Can be prepared 1 day
    > ahead. Cover; chill.)
    >
    > Sprinkle steaks with salt and pepper. Melt 1 T. butter in heavy medium
    > skillet over medium high heat. Add steaks; cook to desired doneness,
    > about 4 mins. per side for rare. Transfer steaks to plates. Add sauce
    > to skillet; bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Season to
    > taste with salt and pepper.
    >
    > Slice the steaks; fan slices on plates. Top with sauce and garnish
    > with chives.
    >
    > Contributor: Bon Appetit
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"



    Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and cognac
    would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the broth to overcome
    or balance the sweet?

    Thanks


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  10. #10
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:M4V0k.6004$[email protected]:

    >
    > Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and
    > cognac would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the
    > broth to overcome or balance the sweet?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >


    I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    the next room.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan

    A man in line at the bank kept falling over...when he got to a teller he
    asked for his balance.



    ---
    avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
    Virus Database (VPS): 080531-1, 05/31/2008
    Tested on: 6/2/2008 11:33:15 AM
    avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2008 ALWIL Software.
    http://www.avast.com




  11. #11
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:M4V0k.6004$[email protected]:

    >
    > Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and
    > cognac would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the
    > broth to overcome or balance the sweet?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >


    I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    the next room.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan

    A man in line at the bank kept falling over...when he got to a teller he
    asked for his balance.



    ---
    avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
    Virus Database (VPS): 080531-1, 05/31/2008
    Tested on: 6/2/2008 11:33:15 AM
    avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2008 ALWIL Software.
    http://www.avast.com




  12. #12
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe


    "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Xns9AB17589226CChahabogus@69.28.186.[email protected]..
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:M4V0k.6004$[email protected]:
    >
    >>
    >> Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and
    >> cognac would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the
    >> broth to overcome or balance the sweet?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    > the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    > french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    > fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    > the next room.
    >
    > The house of the burning beet-Alan


    Her first Mastering the Art of French Cooking

    A many year process.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  13. #13
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe


    "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:M4V0k.6004$[email protected]:
    >
    >>
    >> Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and
    >> cognac would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the
    >> broth to overcome or balance the sweet?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    > the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    > french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    > fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    > the next room.
    >
    > The house of the burning beet-Alan


    Her first Mastering the Art of French Cooking

    A many year process.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  14. #14
    Billy Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Mon, 2 Jun 2008 09:16:50 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and cognac
    >would leave a sweetness, yes?


    Try the recipe...report back.


  15. #15
    Billy Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Mon, 2 Jun 2008 09:16:50 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and cognac
    >would leave a sweetness, yes?


    Try the recipe...report back.


  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Mon, 02 Jun 2008 16:29:47 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    >the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    >french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    >fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    >the next room.


    When you figure it out, give us a holler.

    sf - too "settled in" to get up
    ..... and whose "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" is on a shelf
    within eyeshot, only 6 feet away from the computer.

    I WIN! LOL

    --
    See return address to reply by email
    remove the smile first

  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Mon, 02 Jun 2008 16:29:47 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    >the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    >french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    >fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    >the next room.


    When you figure it out, give us a holler.

    sf - too "settled in" to get up
    ..... and whose "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" is on a shelf
    within eyeshot, only 6 feet away from the computer.

    I WIN! LOL

    --
    See return address to reply by email
    remove the smile first

  18. #18
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Mon, 2 Jun 2008 09:16:50 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and cognac
    >would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the broth to overcome
    >or balance the sweet?


    Dear Old Scoundrel*:

    I would suggest, aulde bean, that you try the recipe as written and
    then tweak it to taste. I am a salt-a-holic, so cannot speak to the
    salt/sweet issue. Nothing is EVER salty enough to suit me.

    Thank GOD for good genes,
    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    *I don't believe I've seen a $$$ royalty for your new nomenclature...

    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  19. #19
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    On Mon, 2 Jun 2008 09:16:50 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >Very nice - I have a question. It seems to me the brown sugar and cognac
    >would leave a sweetness, yes? Is there enough salt in the broth to overcome
    >or balance the sweet?


    Dear Old Scoundrel*:

    I would suggest, aulde bean, that you try the recipe as written and
    then tweak it to taste. I am a salt-a-holic, so cannot speak to the
    salt/sweet issue. Nothing is EVER salty enough to suit me.

    Thank GOD for good genes,
    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    *I don't believe I've seen a $$$ royalty for your new nomenclature...

    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  20. #20
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: New Recipe

    sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 02 Jun 2008 16:29:47 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I've done a similar sauce (without the sugar) and it was fine. I believe
    >> the unsugared sauce is in Julia Child's first cookbook. The volume 1 of
    >> french cooking. The true name of the cookbook escapes me due to a brain
    >> fart. And I'm too lazy to go find and read the title off of the book in
    >> the next room.

    >
    > When you figure it out, give us a holler.
    >
    > sf - too "settled in" to get up
    > .... and whose "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" is on a shelf
    > within eyeshot, only 6 feet away from the computer.
    >
    > I WIN! LOL
    >

    I am currently in the same room as that book, but my French cookbooks
    are buried behind other books, cat food, etc.

    --
    Jean B.

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