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Thread: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    In the LA Times today:

    http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...,1687895.story

    Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    most of *us* have always been!

    --

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"

    -- W.C. Fields

  2. #2
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > In the LA Times today:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...,1687895.story
    >
    > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > most of *us* have always been!


    I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    pardon their laziness, I could puke.

    <but I wont 'cuz it wastes food>

  3. #3
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > In the LA Times today:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...,1687895.story
    >
    > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > most of *us* have always been!


    I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    pardon their laziness, I could puke.

    <but I wont 'cuz it wastes food>

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    Pennyaline wrote:

    > I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    > juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    > preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    > up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    > ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    > both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    > leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    > food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    > sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    > flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    > pardon their laziness, I could puke.
    >


    My wife and I both worked, and being a teacher, she had a lot of work to do at home
    each night and on weekends. For at least half of my career I worked shifts. We
    managed. I can't remember us ever buying a prepared meal, other than a couple
    trays of lasagne. We did our own baking and made most things from scratch.....
    just the odd cake mix and a few cookie mixes.


  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    Pennyaline wrote:

    > I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    > juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    > preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    > up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    > ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    > both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    > leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    > food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    > sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    > flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    > pardon their laziness, I could puke.
    >


    My wife and I both worked, and being a teacher, she had a lot of work to do at home
    each night and on weekends. For at least half of my career I worked shifts. We
    managed. I can't remember us ever buying a prepared meal, other than a couple
    trays of lasagne. We did our own baking and made most things from scratch.....
    just the odd cake mix and a few cookie mixes.


  6. #6
    meatnub Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On May 21, 10:27*am, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@deadparrot.com> wrote:
    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > > In the LA Times today:

    >
    > >http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...8may21,0,16878...

    >
    > > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > > most of *us* have always been!

    >
    > I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    > juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    > preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    > up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    > ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    > both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    > leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    > food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    > sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    > flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    > pardon their laziness, I could puke.
    >
    > <but I wont 'cuz it wastes food>


    Yup, that's all it is! LAZINESS! Yet they constantly complain "i have
    to stop eating out its so expensive".

    I am constantly amazed by the people at the jobs I've been on (and
    currently on) that take those awful namebrand frozen dinners to work
    for lunch. I know a coworker that always complains "i've got to stop
    eating out and start brown bagging it" but never does. Continues to
    spend $8 or more a day on lunch. Come on! This week for lunches all I
    did was throw a dozen chicken thighs in the oven and baked them Sunday
    night. Then the night before each work day I microwave veggies and put
    butter on em, put em in a bowl with a piece of chicken and voila -
    lunch for us and our son.

    My wife and I work full time 5 days a week. We leave at 7:30AM , drop
    son off at daycare, go to work, leave work at 5PM , pick son up, get
    home at 6PM. And I still find time to make dinner. Not only that,
    after our son goes to sleep, I head to the kitchen (anywhere from 8 to
    9 at night) to prepare lunches for the next day (so I don't have to in
    the morning) and will often prepare the next night's dinner, albeit
    simple cooking, nothing from scratch (YET !!)

    "Marketing surveys blame our crowded schedules, our "time poverty":
    The average American can spare just 30 minutes a day for the kitchen"

    Wow, who paid that marketing company for such poor findings?

    Even if they only have 30 minutes in the kitchen that's PLENTY of time
    to make simple meals, like spaghetti and meatballs! Or time to heat up
    the gas grill and grill some food.

    But nah... people would rather be lazy, eat poorly, and complain and
    then wonder why they have no money or don't feel well, or their family
    is dysfunctional and their kids overweight. Well *most* people.

  7. #7
    meatnub Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On May 21, 10:27*am, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@deadparrot.com> wrote:
    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > > In the LA Times today:

    >
    > >http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...8may21,0,16878...

    >
    > > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > > most of *us* have always been!

    >
    > I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    > juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    > preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    > up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    > ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    > both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    > leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    > food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    > sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    > flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    > pardon their laziness, I could puke.
    >
    > <but I wont 'cuz it wastes food>


    Yup, that's all it is! LAZINESS! Yet they constantly complain "i have
    to stop eating out its so expensive".

    I am constantly amazed by the people at the jobs I've been on (and
    currently on) that take those awful namebrand frozen dinners to work
    for lunch. I know a coworker that always complains "i've got to stop
    eating out and start brown bagging it" but never does. Continues to
    spend $8 or more a day on lunch. Come on! This week for lunches all I
    did was throw a dozen chicken thighs in the oven and baked them Sunday
    night. Then the night before each work day I microwave veggies and put
    butter on em, put em in a bowl with a piece of chicken and voila -
    lunch for us and our son.

    My wife and I work full time 5 days a week. We leave at 7:30AM , drop
    son off at daycare, go to work, leave work at 5PM , pick son up, get
    home at 6PM. And I still find time to make dinner. Not only that,
    after our son goes to sleep, I head to the kitchen (anywhere from 8 to
    9 at night) to prepare lunches for the next day (so I don't have to in
    the morning) and will often prepare the next night's dinner, albeit
    simple cooking, nothing from scratch (YET !!)

    "Marketing surveys blame our crowded schedules, our "time poverty":
    The average American can spare just 30 minutes a day for the kitchen"

    Wow, who paid that marketing company for such poor findings?

    Even if they only have 30 minutes in the kitchen that's PLENTY of time
    to make simple meals, like spaghetti and meatballs! Or time to heat up
    the gas grill and grill some food.

    But nah... people would rather be lazy, eat poorly, and complain and
    then wonder why they have no money or don't feel well, or their family
    is dysfunctional and their kids overweight. Well *most* people.

  8. #8
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On 2008-05-21, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In the LA Times today:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...,1687895.story
    >
    > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > most of *us* have always been!


    While I agree in part, it's typical bull**** journalism. For instance:

    "we reject meats that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with artificial
    juice and flavor enhancers."

    We do!? Gee, could someone please lead me to that part of the store where
    they are hiding the meats "that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with
    artificial juice and flavor enhancers."? I'll gladly buy some.

    To hear the LA Times tell it, we are all victims of our own sloth. Bull****.
    Give me a fresh tomato with flavor and I'll use it instead of canned. Give
    me some cherries that don't cost damn near $5 lb and I'll eat them. Give me
    some cheese that has actual flavor because it's been aged longer than a day,
    I'll buy it. When I can buy 2lbs frozen mixed veggies for for $2.50, yet
    fresh corn costs $.50 per ear, I'll probably continue buying the frozen.

    Sorry, I'm not taking the fall on this one.

    nb

  9. #9
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On 2008-05-21, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In the LA Times today:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...,1687895.story
    >
    > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > most of *us* have always been!


    While I agree in part, it's typical bull**** journalism. For instance:

    "we reject meats that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with artificial
    juice and flavor enhancers."

    We do!? Gee, could someone please lead me to that part of the store where
    they are hiding the meats "that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with
    artificial juice and flavor enhancers."? I'll gladly buy some.

    To hear the LA Times tell it, we are all victims of our own sloth. Bull****.
    Give me a fresh tomato with flavor and I'll use it instead of canned. Give
    me some cherries that don't cost damn near $5 lb and I'll eat them. Give me
    some cheese that has actual flavor because it's been aged longer than a day,
    I'll buy it. When I can buy 2lbs frozen mixed veggies for for $2.50, yet
    fresh corn costs $.50 per ear, I'll probably continue buying the frozen.

    Sorry, I'm not taking the fall on this one.

    nb

  10. #10
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    notbob said...

    > On 2008-05-21, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> In the LA Times today:
    >>
    >> http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...ay21,0,1687895.
    >> story
    >>
    >> Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    >> most of *us* have always been!

    >
    > While I agree in part, it's typical bull**** journalism. For instance:
    >
    > "we reject meats that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with
    > artificial juice and flavor enhancers."
    >
    > We do!? Gee, could someone please lead me to that part of the store
    > where they are hiding the meats "that aren't fattened on grain and
    > pumped with artificial juice and flavor enhancers."? I'll gladly buy
    > some.
    >
    > To hear the LA Times tell it, we are all victims of our own sloth.
    > Bull****. Give me a fresh tomato with flavor and I'll use it instead of
    > canned. Give me some cherries that don't cost damn near $5 lb and I'll
    > eat them. Give me some cheese that has actual flavor because it's been
    > aged longer than a day, I'll buy it. When I can buy 2lbs frozen mixed
    > veggies for for $2.50, yet fresh corn costs $.50 per ear, I'll probably
    > continue buying the frozen.
    >
    > Sorry, I'm not taking the fall on this one.
    >
    > nb



    While I can't disagree with the above comments I'd love to see JOC on
    CD/pdf so i could pick my fonts, sizes and justifications for these tired
    eyes!

    Imho,

    Andy


  11. #11
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    notbob said...

    > On 2008-05-21, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> In the LA Times today:
    >>
    >> http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...ay21,0,1687895.
    >> story
    >>
    >> Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    >> most of *us* have always been!

    >
    > While I agree in part, it's typical bull**** journalism. For instance:
    >
    > "we reject meats that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with
    > artificial juice and flavor enhancers."
    >
    > We do!? Gee, could someone please lead me to that part of the store
    > where they are hiding the meats "that aren't fattened on grain and
    > pumped with artificial juice and flavor enhancers."? I'll gladly buy
    > some.
    >
    > To hear the LA Times tell it, we are all victims of our own sloth.
    > Bull****. Give me a fresh tomato with flavor and I'll use it instead of
    > canned. Give me some cherries that don't cost damn near $5 lb and I'll
    > eat them. Give me some cheese that has actual flavor because it's been
    > aged longer than a day, I'll buy it. When I can buy 2lbs frozen mixed
    > veggies for for $2.50, yet fresh corn costs $.50 per ear, I'll probably
    > continue buying the frozen.
    >
    > Sorry, I'm not taking the fall on this one.
    >
    > nb



    While I can't disagree with the above comments I'd love to see JOC on
    CD/pdf so i could pick my fonts, sizes and justifications for these tired
    eyes!

    Imho,

    Andy


  12. #12
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > Pennyaline wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    >>juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    >>preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    >>up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    >>ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    >>both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    >>leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    >>food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    >>sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    >>flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    >>pardon their laziness, I could puke.
    >>

    >
    >
    > My wife and I both worked, and being a teacher, she had a lot of work to do at home
    > each night and on weekends. For at least half of my career I worked shifts. We
    > managed. I can't remember us ever buying a prepared meal, other than a couple
    > trays of lasagne. We did our own baking and made most things from scratch.....
    > just the odd cake mix and a few cookie mixes.
    >


    I cook most night and plan ahead to have enough leftovers for lunches
    the next day, or a second dinner. I still pack my kids lunches and they
    prefer it to the brand-name fast foods offered in their school cafeterias.

    It's not just them, either. One evening I picked up my son and his
    friend from an after-school event and invited the buddy to stay for
    dinner. I said maybe we could order pizza if they wanted.

    My son's friend, who spends a fair amount of time at our house, then
    said, "Missus H, I gotta ask you something an' I know it's rude only
    don't blame my mom because she brought me up better than this, she
    really did but I was wondering if..."

    By now he's really got my attention and I'm wondering what in the world
    this kid's got on his mind...

    "Next time you invite me for supper could you cook steak or salmon like
    you send for Jude's lunch sometimes? Everybody else is eatin' pizza or
    chicken nuggets and he's torturing us eatin' steak or salmon or garlic
    cheese bread or chicken all with spices on and stuff."

    So what could I say to that? What an ego trip for somebody who's proud
    of her cooking. Of course I made steak, sour dough garlic bread,
    steamed zucchini and fresh strawberries for dessert. And it cost about
    the same as the pizzas we would have ordered.


  13. #13
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > Pennyaline wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I truly dislike it whenever someone uses the argument of "having to
    >>juggle work and family" as justification for not preparing meals. Meal
    >>preparation was always part of family time in our clan. My parents grew
    >>up in times when both parents in every family worked long hours to make
    >>ends meet yet put meals on the table the old fashioned way. My parents
    >>both worked, and they made time for us, shopping, cooking, eating and
    >>leisure time. We learned to garden, shop intelligently and cook our own
    >>food. I work very long hours, and prepare very good food. We even eat
    >>sitting at a table, with placemats, napkins, and a full complement of
    >>flatware. When I hear more recent generations using selfish whining to
    >>pardon their laziness, I could puke.
    >>

    >
    >
    > My wife and I both worked, and being a teacher, she had a lot of work to do at home
    > each night and on weekends. For at least half of my career I worked shifts. We
    > managed. I can't remember us ever buying a prepared meal, other than a couple
    > trays of lasagne. We did our own baking and made most things from scratch.....
    > just the odd cake mix and a few cookie mixes.
    >


    I cook most night and plan ahead to have enough leftovers for lunches
    the next day, or a second dinner. I still pack my kids lunches and they
    prefer it to the brand-name fast foods offered in their school cafeterias.

    It's not just them, either. One evening I picked up my son and his
    friend from an after-school event and invited the buddy to stay for
    dinner. I said maybe we could order pizza if they wanted.

    My son's friend, who spends a fair amount of time at our house, then
    said, "Missus H, I gotta ask you something an' I know it's rude only
    don't blame my mom because she brought me up better than this, she
    really did but I was wondering if..."

    By now he's really got my attention and I'm wondering what in the world
    this kid's got on his mind...

    "Next time you invite me for supper could you cook steak or salmon like
    you send for Jude's lunch sometimes? Everybody else is eatin' pizza or
    chicken nuggets and he's torturing us eatin' steak or salmon or garlic
    cheese bread or chicken all with spices on and stuff."

    So what could I say to that? What an ego trip for somebody who's proud
    of her cooking. Of course I made steak, sour dough garlic bread,
    steamed zucchini and fresh strawberries for dessert. And it cost about
    the same as the pizzas we would have ordered.


  14. #14
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On 2008-05-21, Andy <q> wrote:

    > CD/pdf so i could pick my fonts, sizes and justifications for these tired
    > eyes!


    Amen, Andy!

    nb

  15. #15
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On 2008-05-21, Andy <q> wrote:

    > CD/pdf so i could pick my fonts, sizes and justifications for these tired
    > eyes!


    Amen, Andy!

    nb

  16. #16
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On May 21, 11:20*am, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > On 2008-05-21, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    >
    > > In the LA Times today:

    >
    > >http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...8may21,0,16878...

    >
    > > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > > most of *us* have always been!

    >
    > While I agree in part, it's typical bull**** journalism. *For instance:
    >
    > "we reject meats that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with artificial
    > juice and flavor enhancers."
    >
    > We do!? *Gee, could someone please lead me to that part of the store where
    > they are hiding the meats "that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with
    > artificial juice and flavor enhancers."? *I'll gladly buy some. *
    >
    > To hear the LA Times tell it, we are all victims of our own sloth. *Bull****.
    > Give me a fresh tomato with flavor and I'll use it instead of canned. *Give
    > me some cherries that don't cost damn near $5 lb and I'll eat them. *Give me
    > some cheese that has actual flavor because it's been aged longer than a day,
    > I'll buy it. *When I can buy 2lbs frozen mixed veggies for for $2.50, yet
    > fresh corn costs $.50 per ear, I'll probably continue buying the frozen. *
    >
    > Sorry, I'm not taking the fall on this one.
    >
    > nb


    Don't forget the author's new book,The End of Food, reviewed in the
    latest library copy of the New Yorker just came out. Some of this may
    be hype for the book although the review seems to suggest that he
    really does feel this way.

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  17. #17
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On May 21, 11:20*am, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > On 2008-05-21, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    >
    > > In the LA Times today:

    >
    > >http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/...8may21,0,16878...

    >
    > > Looks like the economy may drive "us" back into the kitchen - where
    > > most of *us* have always been!

    >
    > While I agree in part, it's typical bull**** journalism. *For instance:
    >
    > "we reject meats that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with artificial
    > juice and flavor enhancers."
    >
    > We do!? *Gee, could someone please lead me to that part of the store where
    > they are hiding the meats "that aren't fattened on grain and pumped with
    > artificial juice and flavor enhancers."? *I'll gladly buy some. *
    >
    > To hear the LA Times tell it, we are all victims of our own sloth. *Bull****.
    > Give me a fresh tomato with flavor and I'll use it instead of canned. *Give
    > me some cherries that don't cost damn near $5 lb and I'll eat them. *Give me
    > some cheese that has actual flavor because it's been aged longer than a day,
    > I'll buy it. *When I can buy 2lbs frozen mixed veggies for for $2.50, yet
    > fresh corn costs $.50 per ear, I'll probably continue buying the frozen. *
    >
    > Sorry, I'm not taking the fall on this one.
    >
    > nb


    Don't forget the author's new book,The End of Food, reviewed in the
    latest library copy of the New Yorker just came out. Some of this may
    be hype for the book although the review seems to suggest that he
    really does feel this way.

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  18. #18
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    notbob said...

    > On 2008-05-21, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    >> CD/pdf so i could pick my fonts, sizes and justifications for these

    tired
    >> eyes!

    >
    > Amen, Andy!
    >
    > nb



    nb,

    So I'm NOT alone in my thought process/eyesight?!?

    I felt so alone.

    Best

    Andy

  19. #19
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    notbob said...

    > On 2008-05-21, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    >> CD/pdf so i could pick my fonts, sizes and justifications for these

    tired
    >> eyes!

    >
    > Amen, Andy!
    >
    > nb



    nb,

    So I'm NOT alone in my thought process/eyesight?!?

    I felt so alone.

    Best

    Andy

  20. #20
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The "New" Joy of Cooking?

    On 2008-05-21, Andy <q> wrote:

    > So I'm NOT alone in my thought process/eyesight?!?
    >
    > I felt so alone.


    Hardly. My default (only!) screen resolution is always 800x600. 'Course I
    always sit back at least a yd from my monitor. I wanted to bring my 20" CRT
    when I moved, but it was just too big and heavy. I need a 20" flatpanel or,
    better yet, a projector.

    nb

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