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Thread: New information or you live and learn.

  1. #1
    James Silverton Guest

    Default New information or you live and learn.

    Hello All!

    Today, I bought some blueberries and I discovered that an "American Dry
    Pint" was 551ml and "1 Chopine Américaine Sèche" !



    --


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  2. #2
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > Hello All!
    >
    > Today, I bought some blueberries and I discovered that an "American Dry
    > Pint" was 551ml and "1 Chopine Américaine Sèche" !


    Yep, that US conversion to metric is moving right along... at the pace
    of a dead snail in super glue... might be complete in another 100 years
    or so...

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    Pete wrote on Fri, 10 Jul 2009 13:05:02 -0500:


    > James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >> Hello All!
    >>
    >> Today, I bought some blueberries and I discovered that an
    >> "American Dry Pint" was 551ml and "1 Chopine Américaine
    >> Sèche" !



    >Yep, that US conversion to metric is moving right along... at the pace
    >of a dead snail in super glue... might be complete in another 100 years
    >or so...


    Well, I won't hold onto my hat since the Metric system has been *legal*
    here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  4. #4
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Well, I won't hold onto my hat since the Metric system has been *legal*
    > here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)


    It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    From the Eddie Izzard skit about Americans and the metric system: "And
    you got rid of it! You had a look at it… you sort of played with the
    metric system like this (mimes stirring up something at arm's length,
    then throwing it away). And all because of that this little machine went
    'Zwoom'. All the little microbes and all the little technological things
    in that thing going to Mars going, 'Wasn't that our turning?'"

  5. #5
    pat Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    Pennyaline wrote:
    >James Silverton wrote:
    >>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)

    >
    >It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!


    There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    see in the supermarket.

  6. #6
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Pennyaline wrote:
    >>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)

    >>
    >>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >
    > There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    > for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    > see in the supermarket.


    Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and thus
    will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo would make
    their brain hurt.

    The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't want
    to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system is
    superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world economy, like
    it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for our country to deal
    wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope would not have been screwed
    up.

    I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and sensible,
    and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used it.



  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Pennyaline wrote:
    > >>James Silverton wrote:
    > >>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    > >>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    > >>
    > >>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    > >
    > > There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    > > for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    > > see in the supermarket.

    >
    > Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    > conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and thus
    > will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo would make
    > their brain hurt.
    >
    > The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't want
    > to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system is
    > superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world economy, like
    > it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for our country to deal
    > wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope would not have been screwed
    > up.
    >
    > I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and sensible,
    > and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used it.


    We have too and I like it at work, but it'd take some getting used to at
    the grocery store. ;-) For many not familiar with it tho', it would be
    painful.

    But only at first...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  8. #8
    graham Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "pat" <pat.norto[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Pennyaline wrote:
    >>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)

    >>
    >>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >
    > There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    > for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    > see in the supermarket.


    Hmmm! How backward!



  9. #9
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 06:51:39 -0600, "graham" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>
    >>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >>
    >> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >> see in the supermarket.

    >
    >Hmmm! How backward!
    >


    You know it was the USA that wanted both Canada and itself to go metric. But
    when the time came to implement the change over, it was the US that backed out
    of the arrangement.

  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 04:27:42 -0700 (PDT), pat wrote:

    > Pennyaline wrote:
    >>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)

    >>
    >>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >
    > There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    > for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    > see in the supermarket.


    i think it's more that they require imperial measurements, not that they're
    forbidding metric.

    but maybe the GOP members of the house will get a wild hair up their asses
    and try to do exactly that.

    your pal,
    blake

  11. #11
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 08:44:56 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>
    >>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >>
    >> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >> see in the supermarket.

    >
    > Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    > conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and thus
    > will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo would make
    > their brain hurt.
    >
    > The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't want
    > to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system is
    > superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world economy, like
    > it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for our country to deal
    > wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope would not have been screwed
    > up.
    >
    > I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and sensible,
    > and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used it.


    i'm not that old, but i think i would spend the rest of my life thinking,
    'o.k., a half kilo is about a pound.'

    but at least the dopers out there know it's 28 grams to the ounce.


    your pal,
    blake


  12. #12
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 06:51:39 -0600, graham wrote:

    > "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>
    >>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >>
    >> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >> see in the supermarket.

    >
    > Hmmm! How backward!


    what?! USA number one!!!

    your pal,
    blake

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    "Omelet" wrote

    > We have too and I like it at work, but it'd take some getting used to at
    > the grocery store. ;-) For many not familiar with it tho', it would be
    > painful.


    That's one of the challanges new military had in Sasebo if it was their
    first time overseas. Translating to metrics when it was that old 'tried and
    true' USA based recipe 'Mom sent'. Just 'how much to buy' from the shop
    keeper was a challange to some at the start. They could handle the idea
    that 500g is about a lb, but would get confused when things were sold as 'x'
    yen per 100g.

    > But only at first...


    Correct. It's not that hard when doing dry weights. It's translating USA
    recipes which are normally 'volume based' into weight measures then back
    that gets folks.

    A common recipe may say : Take a cup of cubed cooked potatoes... (ok, in
    english thats real easy). How many 100g alotments do you need to get in raw
    potatoes? (answer, about 120g raw will yield that after you clean, peel and
    chop but depends on how you peel and the variety used. They have a lot of
    variety there on potatoes with only the classic Idaho missing).

    How about this recipe: 1/4 cup grated cheese.... (hehehe, like any sane
    person, get a block and save the rest, this one is easy).

    Sure you can cheat with a kitchen scale if you also have how much the item
    should weigh, but hate to tell you how 'chiklit small' their kitchens out in
    town can be. Room for a weigh scale? You gotta be kidding!

    LOL, that reminds me of the time Don got a frozen pizza. Normal USA
    Freschetta (sp?). It didnt fit in the oven. Had to cut it in half and cook
    it angled in 2 parts. ;-)



  14. #14
    graham Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:lfw6lo1obwfr$.d0uife5lmkl$.[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 06:51:39 -0600, graham wrote:
    >
    >> "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>>
    >>>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!
    >>>
    >>> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >>> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >>> see in the supermarket.

    >>
    >> Hmmm! How backward!

    >
    > what?! USA number one!!!
    >


    In what? Adulation of celebrities?



  15. #15
    graham Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:y2dht6y5qeqt$.[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 08:44:56 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    >> "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>>
    >>>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!
    >>>
    >>> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >>> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >>> see in the supermarket.

    >>
    >> Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    >> conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and
    >> thus
    >> will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo would
    >> make
    >> their brain hurt.
    >>
    >> The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't
    >> want
    >> to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system is
    >> superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world economy,
    >> like
    >> it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for our country to
    >> deal
    >> wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope would not have been
    >> screwed
    >> up.
    >>
    >> I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and
    >> sensible,
    >> and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used it.

    >
    > i'm not that old, but i think i would spend the rest of my life thinking,
    > 'o.k., a half kilo is about a pound.'
    >


    That only happens if both systems are used together. If the US went metric
    overnight, i.e., with no transition period, it wouldn't be long before
    people thought in metric.



  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    On Sun 12 Jul 2009 07:48:14a, graham told us...

    >
    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:y2dht6y5qeqt$.[email protected]..
    >> On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 08:44:56 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>
    >>> "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected].
    >>> ..
    >>>> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been
    >>>>>>*legal* here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a
    >>>>>>"Chopine" :-)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!
    >>>>
    >>>> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >>>> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things
    >>>> you see in the supermarket.
    >>>
    >>> Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    >>> conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and
    >>> thus will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo
    >>> would make their brain hurt.
    >>>
    >>> The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't
    >>> want to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system
    >>> is superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world
    >>> economy, like it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for
    >>> our country to deal wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope
    >>> would not have been screwed up.
    >>>
    >>> I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and
    >>> sensible, and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used
    >>> it.

    >>
    >> i'm not that old, but i think i would spend the rest of my life
    >> thinking, 'o.k., a half kilo is about a pound.'
    >>

    >
    > That only happens if both systems are used together. If the US went
    > metric overnight, i.e., with no transition period, it wouldn't be long
    > before people thought in metric.
    >
    >
    >


    Among other things, if you cook and use cookbooks, you'd be constantly
    converting forever...unless you threw them all out and replaced them. Most
    of my US cookbooks do not contain metric measurements.

    Having said that, I have quite a few cookbooks from the UK and Europe. I
    made a point of buying measuring equipment for that purpose, as well as a
    scale that weighs in both ounces and grams.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If junk food is the devil, then a sweet orange is as scripture.
    ~Audrey Foris




  17. #17
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.

    Wayne wrote on Sun, 12 Jul 2009 16:03:50 GMT:

    >> "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:y2dht6y5qeqt$.[email protected]..
    >> That only happens if both systems are used together. If the
    >> US went metric overnight, i.e., with no transition period, it
    >> wouldn't be long before people thought in metric.
    >>

    > Among other things, if you cook and use cookbooks, you'd be
    > constantly converting forever...unless you threw them all out
    > and replaced them. Most of my US cookbooks do not contain
    > metric measurements.


    > Having said that, I have quite a few cookbooks from the UK and
    > Europe. I made a point of buying measuring equipment for that
    > purpose, as well as a scale that weighs in both ounces and
    > grams.


    If the US went metric contrary to the will of the public, several
    politicians would get themselves elected on a pledge to reverse the
    decision.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    >
    > "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>
    >>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!

    >>
    >> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >> see in the supermarket.

    >
    > Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    > conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and
    > thus will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo
    > would make their brain hurt.
    >
    > The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't want
    > to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system is
    > superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world economy,
    > like it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for our country
    > to deal wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope would not have
    > been screwed up.
    >
    > I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and sensible,
    > and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used it.
    >

    The key obstacle is with interpolation, it's impossible for anyone to
    interpolate acurately between different measuring systems. Once one has
    been exposed to a particular measurement system from birth all others will
    forever be foreign. You may use metric (we all do to a degree) but you use
    it the same way say native Spanish speaking folks learn English as a second
    language... metric will never become as second nature for you as English
    measurement. If your car's speedometer wasn't marked side by side in MPH
    and KPH there'd be no way you could come close to estimating your KPH, but
    I'd bet you could tell even before looking that you're doing 60MPH in a
    55MPH zone.. your toe would be easing off the gas even before you saw the
    man in the big hat in your rear view mirror, and even though you realized he
    wasn't gunning for anyone 5 miles over you'd be holding your breath till he
    passed. Don't tell me you can go outdoors right now without looking at a
    thermometer and guesstimate the temperature in Celsius, no friggin' way...
    you'd be scratchin' your head screwin' up your eyes, and even though you can
    come within 5º F you'd need to go look for a conversion table. Quick, how
    many inches is a 27 mm wrench... I'm positive you'd have to look it up, or
    at least calculate millimeters in your head. I happen to know that one
    because I had to buy a 27 mm wrench for the bolt that holds on my big mower
    blades... it's nearly 1 1/16" but not quite. I've used all kinds of metric
    tools for more than 40 years but still need to double check... I can eyeball
    a 1/4"-20 Allen screw at 20 feet but I will always need to measure metric
    hardware. I can slice 1 pound of balogna +/- one slice just by heft in my
    hand, but the closest I can interpolate a Kilo of balogna is to figure near
    abouts the heft of a 36 C cup. LOL




  19. #19
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Among other things, if you cook and use cookbooks, you'd be constantly
    > converting forever...unless you threw them all out and replaced them.
    > Most
    > of my US cookbooks do not contain metric measurements.
    >
    > Having said that, I have quite a few cookbooks from the UK and Europe. I
    > made a point of buying measuring equipment for that purpose, as well as a
    > scale that weighs in both ounces and grams.


    Once you start using the system, you know the conversions easily and
    quickly. Like bi-lingual people that slip in and out of both languages as
    if they are one. The most difficult part is just accepting that you are
    going to use metric and in a few days, it is second nature.

    I can look at a pressure gauge and see 2 bar or 30 psi and know what it
    means. In any case, I don't see any changes coming to the US kitchen in my
    lifetime. Too many people just won't change.



  20. #20
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: New information or you live and learn.


    "graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:PIm6m.4589$[email protected]..
    >
    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:y2dht6y5qeqt$.[email protected]..
    >> On Sun, 12 Jul 2009 08:44:56 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>
    >>> "pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]...
    >>>> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>>>>James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>>>Well, I won't hold onto my hat since theMetric systemhas been *legal*
    >>>>>>here for about a century. I'd also forgotten what was a "Chopine" :-)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>It may be legal, young fella, but it isn't American!
    >>>>
    >>>> There are US laws that forbid metrication. US Federal law (the FPLA,
    >>>> for example) forbids metric-only labels on most prepackaged things you
    >>>> see in the supermarket.
    >>>
    >>> Probably because too many people would not know how to easily do the
    >>> conversion or think in metric terms. Bacon has always been a pound and
    >>> thus
    >>> will remain so, or something like that. 500 grams or a half kilo would
    >>> make
    >>> their brain hurt.
    >>>
    >>> The two reasons I've always run into is a large percentage just don't
    >>> want
    >>> to change and are afraid, another big group thinks the US system is
    >>> superior, just because it is the US system. We are in a world economy,
    >>> like
    >>> it or not, and if we used metric, it would be easier for our country to
    >>> deal
    >>> wit the rest of the world. The Hubble telescope would not have been
    >>> screwed
    >>> up.
    >>>
    >>> I've been using metric at work for 20 years now. It is easy and
    >>> sensible,
    >>> and the choice of most everyone there now that they've used it.

    >>
    >> i'm not that old, but i think i would spend the rest of my life thinking,
    >> 'o.k., a half kilo is about a pound.'
    >>

    >
    > That only happens if both systems are used together. If the US went
    > metric overnight, i.e., with no transition period, it wouldn't be long
    > before people thought in metric.
    >
    >

    Nonsense. If you need to think about it then it's not second nature...
    metric will never become second nature to someone who grew up with English
    measurement from the cradle. I know auto mechnics with 40 years experience
    who readily admit that they still need to double/triple check anything
    metric... they can eyeball the correct socket for any SAE bolt first shot
    but with metric they have to try 2-3. An American has about as much chance
    of having metric become second nature as they would driving on the left side
    of the road.




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