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Thread: Need help on eating healthier

  1. #1
    FFFF Guest

    Default Need help on eating healthier


    This was the best forum I could find to post this in. I'm a 21 year old
    male from Michigan and would like to have more energy and keep my body
    in good shape. The food I generally eat
    Daily: A bowl of cereal such as frosted cheerios, raisin bran, frosted
    flakes, or honey bunches of oats with skim milk.
    A YOPLAIT! yogurt either an original or thick and creamy.
    A carrot/celery stick, some grapes or a banana, an apple or an orange.
    A couple graham crackers with peanut butter/ or a wheat toast.

    Throughout the week I usually have:
    About 3 meals of eggs, maybe once a week with bacon.
    usually about 1 or 2 meals of a meat like chicken or meatballs, often
    microwaved.
    the rest of the food tends to be candy or frozen dinners like hot
    pockets.

    Nearly the only thing I drink is bottled water, maybe once in a while a
    glass of orange juice from a random grocery store.

    Keep in mind that I have pretty much no knowledge of cooking anything,
    the only thing I've ever cooked were eggs and canned soup. So the more
    simple the preparations the better.

    As long as I'm eating healthy I don't really care what the food tastes
    like because I feel being healthy is more important than enjoying what
    I am eating.




    --
    FFFF

  2. #2
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    [email protected] wrote:
    >I'm a 21 year old
    >male from Michigan and would like to have more energy and keep my body
    >in good shape. The food I generally eat
    >Daily: A bowl of cereal such as frosted cheerios, raisin bran, frosted
    >flakes, or honey bunches of oats with skim milk.
    >A YOPLAIT! yogurt either an original or thick and creamy.
    >A carrot/celery stick, some grapes or a banana, an apple or an orange.
    >A couple graham crackers with peanut butter/ or a wheat toast.


    If you feel you have too little energy eating that way, it could be because
    you're eating too many carbs and your blood sugar is spiking, then diving.
    Cereal, sugary yogurt, fruit, Graham crackers, wheat toast and sweet vegetables
    such as carrots might be driving your insulin production system crazy. After
    two weeks eliminating all refined carbs including starches, sugars and fruits,
    you can begin to reincorporate high fiber grains, fruits and even occasional
    sugar into a low-carb base. Atkins gets around to this by the Ongoing Weight
    Loss phase, while South Beach starts reintroducing carbs by Phase 2. Try South
    Beach or Atkins as alternatives.

    >Throughout the week I usually have:
    >About 3 meals of eggs, maybe once a week with bacon.


    That sounds good.

    >usually about 1 or 2 meals of a meat like chicken or meatballs, often
    >microwaved.


    Those meals probably contain many more additives and preservatives than you
    think; they're also probably higher in sodium than what you could easily
    prepare at home.

    >the rest of the food tends to be candy or frozen dinners like hot
    >pockets.


    Sounds like you've got too much processed food going on there.

    >Nearly the only thing I drink is bottled water, maybe once in a while a
    >glass of orange juice from a random grocery store.


    Pasturized juice with added sugar, the kind you get at random grocery stores.
    It's honestly no wonder you're feeling sluggish. In a nutshell, you're probably
    eating more carbs than your body can metabolize. Have you had your fasting
    glucose levels taken? If you're hungry every couple of hours, it's very likely
    that your high-carb diet is doing you in.

    >Keep in mind that I have pretty much no knowledge of cooking anything,
    >the only thing I've ever cooked were eggs and canned soup. So the more
    >simple the preparations the better.


    Buy some cookbooks or borrow some from libraries. There are more recipes online
    than you could ever catalogue, let alone prepare. Basically, cooking can be
    reduced to a few variables: main ingredient, seasonings, liquid, oil, vessel
    and heat. Depending on the main ingredient, it might be better to braze or
    saute it, bake or broil, poach or fry. The nature of the main ingredient and
    the desired outcome determine how it is to be cooked. You don't fry roasts or
    brisket because their flesh takes long, slow brazing to tenderize. Chicken
    breasts are best cooked for as short a time as possible over as low a heat as
    possible. Beans can be boiled and transferred to a crockpot to stew for six to
    eight hours. Most any vegetable can be deliciously roasted at 450 degrees for
    about half an hour, brushed with olive oil, salt and pepper. In baking, exact
    measurements and resting times can make cakes poof or serve as door stoppers.
    Any vegetable that you can chew raw can be put into a salad. Anything can be
    simmered with water and aromatic herbs to make soup. Most grains plump up in
    boiling water. Fish never takes long to cook, regardless of method. If you like
    melted cheese, cover any casserole with it and bake it uncovered for its last
    twenty minutes. Blend all marinade ingredients together before applying them to
    meat, fish or poultry, so that you don't have seasonings unevenly distributed.
    Melted sugar or artificial sweeteners can burn you, so watch out when they
    begin to boil. Rinse out your cutting boards when they've been used for meat.
    Don't leave any food sitting at room temperature for long. These are the
    basics.

    >As long as I'm eating healthy I don't really care what the food tastes
    >like because I feel being healthy is more important than enjoying what
    >I am eating.


    That's part of why you're asking these questions in the first place. You eat
    junk foods with allegedly healthy labels. Most of your diet consists of
    processed foods with so few inherent nutrients that they have to be vitamin
    enriched. If it ain't got enough vitamins in its natural state, leave it for
    pigs. Eat foods whose main ingredients are the fodos themselves. If you want
    chicke, eat chicken rather than some dish where chicken is tenth in a long
    artificial ingredients list. Want cereal? Make your own granola or steel cut
    oats in a rice cooker. Get into bread making or find a real bakery. Otherwise,
    ditch supermarket bread because of its lack of nutrients. Eat brown rice
    instead of white, whole wheat pasta instead of white. Save potatoes for special
    occasions. Squeeze your own orange juice. Best of all, take any vegetables and
    fruits on hand, add two cups of water and blend for a tasty, nutritious
    breakfast every morning.

    Orlando

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    FFF wrote:
    >
    > This was the best forum I could find to post this in. I'm a 21 year old
    > male from Michigan and would like to have more energy and keep my body
    > in good shape. The food I generally eat
    > Daily: A bowl of cereal such as frosted cheerios, raisin bran, frosted
    > flakes, or honey bunches of oats with skim milk.
    > A YOPLAIT! yogurt either an original or thick and creamy.
    > A carrot/celery stick, some grapes or a banana, an apple or an orange.
    > A couple graham crackers with peanut butter/ or a wheat toast.


    Not nearly enough taurine, too many nutritionally inactive vitamin B-12
    analogs, extreme omega-6/omega-3 imbalance -- no, this is surely
    not a healthful diet. You need to return the diet of ancient Man.
    The diet of Man today is much different from that of ancient Man.
    As a whole, we eat much more meat than did ancient Man, and we eat
    different parts of the animal.

    Virtually all meat we eat is striated muscle tissue, the type of
    muscle in the arms or legs which does the running and heavy lifting.
    But there are three types of muscle: striated, smooth, and cardiac.
    Most people eat _no_ smooth or cardiac muscle in their diet.

    Ancient Man ate not only all three types of muscle, but organ meats
    and skin as well. Eating only striated muscle might make sense for
    an athelete like a runner or weight lifter, but for the average person
    this is a diet far different from that of your ancient ancestors.

    In addition to eating whole animal meat, it is also important to
    eat mature animal meat. Virtually all meat sold in supermarkets is
    from young animals, only a year or two old. It costs too much money
    to keep the animals alive until maturity. The flesh of these young
    animals is packed with the hormones and enzymes of young growing
    animals, which is great if you're going to feed it to children,
    but can be highly stressful to feed to an adult. Too many people
    continue the eating habits they learned as children into adulthood,
    where it causes many of the problems associated with middle-age.

    But there is one meat which combines all three types of muscle tissue
    plus various organs and is made from mature animals, retired dairy
    cattle which have already given birth and produced life-giving milk.
    This meat is bologna (pronounced ba-LO-ney), and is widely available
    at fine delicatessens and meat markets.

    Unfortunately, there is a conspiracy among the big drug companies
    to suppress this information. They know they would be put out of
    business tomorrow if everybody were eating bologna for health.

    Just in posting this to the net, I'm taking a chance that they might
    send out a hit man to kill me. So you'd better save a copy of this
    file because you might never see it again!

  4. #4
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 22:26:02 +0000, FFFF wrote:

    > This was the best forum I could find to post this in. I'm a 21 year old
    > male from Michigan and would like to have more energy and keep my body
    > in good shape. The food I generally eat Daily: A bowl of cereal such as
    > frosted cheerios, raisin bran, frosted flakes, or honey bunches of oats
    > with skim milk. A YOPLAIT! yogurt either an original or thick and
    > creamy. A carrot/celery stick, some grapes or a banana, an apple or an
    > orange. A couple graham crackers with peanut butter/ or a wheat toast.
    >
    > Throughout the week I usually have:
    > About 3 meals of eggs, maybe once a week with bacon. usually about 1 or
    > 2 meals of a meat like chicken or meatballs, often microwaved.
    > the rest of the food tends to be candy or frozen dinners like hot
    > pockets.
    >
    > Nearly the only thing I drink is bottled water, maybe once in a while a
    > glass of orange juice from a random grocery store.
    >
    > Keep in mind that I have pretty much no knowledge of cooking anything,
    > the only thing I've ever cooked were eggs and canned soup. So the more
    > simple the preparations the better.
    >



    Those cereals mentioned need to go. Instead, try rolled oats - they take
    a little longer to prepare, but much tastier (if done right) and a LOT
    healthier. Also a lot cheaper. If you must have a sweetener, perhaps some
    honey, preferably raw honey (if that's not a crime in the U.S).

    The candy or frozen dinners like hot pockets also need to go.

    If anything comes in a cardboard box and has a long shelf life, chances
    are it too should be thrown out.

    Since energy seems to be a priority, investigate Maca powder, raw Cacao
    beans or powder and bee pollen.

    You could make the first meal of the day a smoothie with these items,
    perhaps add some fruit, which will certainly give you a boost. With the
    Maca powder in particular, you should notice a noticeable improvement the
    longer you use it.

    You may also benefit from cutting down carbohydrate intake, especially
    the white death AKA sugar.

    Wheat and other grains containing gluten may -just may - also make you
    feel sluggish. If you're not sure if you're sensitive to gluten, this may
    also be well worth investigating. More people are sensitive to gluten
    than they realise.

    > As long as I'm eating healthy I don't really care what the food tastes
    > like because I feel being healthy is more important than enjoying what I
    > am eating.


    In the long term, you /will/ care what it tastes like...
    You need to investigate what works for you, including what tastes good to
    you, stuff you can continue indefinitely without a struggle. By the looks
    of it, cutting back on sugar will be your biggest hurdle.

    Good luck.



  5. #5
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 20:47:09 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > d in supermarkets is from young
    > animals, only a year or two old. It costs too much money to keep the
    > animals alive until maturity. The flesh of these young animals is
    > packed


    I'm surprised you didnt suggest he eat high meat <G>.




  6. #6
    Stan Horwitz Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    In article <[email protected]>,
    FFFF <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This was the best forum I could find to post this in. I'm a 21 year old
    > male from Michigan and would like to have more energy and keep my body
    > in good shape. The food I generally eat
    > Daily: A bowl of cereal such as frosted cheerios, raisin bran, frosted
    > flakes, or honey bunches of oats with skim milk.
    > A YOPLAIT! yogurt either an original or thick and creamy.
    > A carrot/celery stick, some grapes or a banana, an apple or an orange.
    > A couple graham crackers with peanut butter/ or a wheat toast.
    >
    > Throughout the week I usually have:
    > About 3 meals of eggs, maybe once a week with bacon.
    > usually about 1 or 2 meals of a meat like chicken or meatballs, often
    > microwaved.
    > the rest of the food tends to be candy or frozen dinners like hot
    > pockets.
    >
    > Nearly the only thing I drink is bottled water, maybe once in a while a
    > glass of orange juice from a random grocery store.
    >
    > Keep in mind that I have pretty much no knowledge of cooking anything,
    > the only thing I've ever cooked were eggs and canned soup. So the more
    > simple the preparations the better.
    >
    > As long as I'm eating healthy I don't really care what the food tastes
    > like because I feel being healthy is more important than enjoying what
    > I am eating.


    Sign up for http://www.sparkpeople.com for lots of info on eating
    healthy foods.

  7. #7
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    On Feb 9, 5:26*pm, FFFF <FFFF.3d6a...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > This was the best forum I could find to post this in. *I'm a 21 year old
    > male from Michigan and would like to have more energy and keep my body
    > in good shape. *The food I generally eat *
    > Daily: A bowl of cereal such as frosted cheerios, raisin bran, frosted
    > flakes, or honey bunches of oats with skim milk.
    > A YOPLAIT! yogurt either an original or thick and creamy.
    > A carrot/celery stick, some grapes or a banana, an apple or an orange.
    > A couple graham crackers with peanut butter/ or a wheat toast.
    >
    > Throughout the week I usually have:
    > About 3 meals of eggs, maybe once a week with bacon.
    > usually about 1 or 2 meals of a meat like chicken or meatballs, often
    > microwaved.
    > the rest of the food tends to be candy or frozen dinners like hot
    > pockets.
    >
    > Nearly the only thing I drink is bottled water, maybe once in a while a
    > glass of orange juice from a random grocery store.
    >
    > Keep in mind that I have pretty much no knowledge of cooking anything,
    > the only thing I've ever cooked were eggs and canned soup. So the more
    > simple the preparations the better. *


    You should learn to cook. Chicks dig it. The first meal cooked for
    me by
    the man who has been my husband for 20 years was:

    Caesar salad
    Garlic bread
    Blackened fish (orange roughy)
    Steamed broccoli

    I recommend the Betty Crocker cookbook, or the Better Homes and
    Gardens
    cookbook. If you go to Border's, I bet there's someone who could
    point you
    at a beginner's cookbook.

    > As long as I'm eating healthy I don't really care what the food tastes
    > like because I feel being healthy is more important than enjoying what
    > I am eating.


    I think if you were eating a greater variety of foods, you would take
    more
    pleasure in it.

    Several other posters have recommended extreme changes in your eating
    habits. I think if you made some small changes you could see a lot of
    improvement, especially at your age.

    I agree you should stop eating such sugary cereal. Try plain Cheerios
    with a
    banana and milk, but no added sugar.

    Make sure you have vegetables at lunch and dinner every day. The more
    different colors of
    food you eat, the better. Green, orange, red, purple. And I don't
    mean
    Swee-Tarts. Lettuce, broccoli, carrots, tomatoes, purple cabbage, and
    so on.
    Go ahead and get the bags of salad or pre-shredded cabbage. Frozen
    vegetables
    are easy and often nutritionally superior to fresh (especially here in
    Michigan, especially
    this time of year). Just nuke 'em and eat 'em.

    In the aisle of the grocery store where the rice is, there's all kinds
    of boxes of
    Near East grain products. Some of them just need to have hot water
    poured over
    them and sit for 5 minutes. Once you're figured out what you like,
    you can figure
    out how to make them from scratch because like most convenience foods
    they
    cost a lot of money for what you get.

    Buy fresh meat. Practially any boneless meat (beef, chicken, pork,
    fish) can be
    salted & peppered and thrown into a hot frying pan with a little oil.
    Turn it when
    it's brown on the first side and cook it through. You can make a
    little slice in it
    to see if it's done. Or you can fry in bacon grease (assuming you're
    making
    your own bacon and not going out for it). Save the bacon grease in a
    clean jar
    in the fridge and use it when you want a little smoky goodness.

    Extra-virgin olive oil is tasty and you can use it to add flavor to
    your pan-fried meat.

    If you don't have much time on weekdays, get started with cooking for
    yourself
    on weekends.

    Cindy Hamilton

  8. #8
    AnthonyS11 Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier


    'Je▀us[_11_ Wrote:
    > ;1268597']On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 20:47:09 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > -
    > d in supermarkets is from young
    > animals, only a year or two old. It costs too much money to keep the
    > animals alive until maturity. The flesh of these young animals is
    > packed-
    >
    > I'm surprised you didnt suggest he eat high meat G.



    The first thing you should do is get rid of sugary cereal, such as
    frosted flakes. Replace with Kashi or other high fiber cereal. Also,
    choose non fay yogurt. The little things make a huge difference.




    --
    AnthonyS11

  9. #9
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 14:39:56 +0000, AnthonyS11 wrote:

    > 'Je├čus[_11_ Wrote:
    >> ;1268597']On Mon, 09 Feb 2009 20:47:09 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote: -
    >> d in supermarkets is from young
    >> animals, only a year or two old. It costs too much money to keep the
    >> animals alive until maturity. The flesh of these young animals is
    >> packed-
    >>
    >> I'm surprised you didnt suggest he eat high meat G.

    >
    >
    > The first thing you should do is get rid of sugary cereal, such as
    > frosted flakes. Replace with Kashi or other high fiber cereal.


    He may well be better off removing some or all grains, let alone 'cereal'.

    > Also,
    > choose non fay yogurt. The little things make a huge difference.



    What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?



  10. #10
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    x-no-archive: yes

    Je├čus wrote:

    > What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?
    >
    >


    None, healthwise, unless you're a calorie counter.

    Susan

  11. #11
    FFFF Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier


    Okay for breakfast I should make a fruit smoothie and add some maca
    powder. Then midday I'll have a bowl of rolled oats and some
    veggies/salad. With the rolled oats should I use water or can I use
    milk?

    On the 4 days a week I don't have an egg meal, one of them I will
    probably eat out at a restaurant. The 3 other days I should cook some
    fresh meat on the stove top or oven? Can I get acceptable meat from a
    grocery store like Meijer or should I shop for it somewhere else?

    Considering these meals should I pick certain snacks to balance
    anything that is lacking? Someone mentioned a nonfat live culture
    yogurt.

    I honestly don't know if the statement saying that bologna is extremely
    healthy is a joke or not, most of the sites I look at say it is not good
    for you.




    --
    FFFF

  12. #12
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier


    "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > Je▀us wrote:
    >
    >> What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > None, healthwise, unless you're a calorie counter.
    >

    Or have congestive heart failure or other disorders that do better with a
    lower fat diet. I am not one of those low fat freaks, but it's just as
    stupid to say that eating all the fat you want is just fine for everyone, or
    that there are no benefits to low fat foods except lower calories. Have you
    hears of atheriosclerosis?



  13. #13
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:54:57 -0500, Susan wrote:

    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > Je├čus wrote:
    >
    >> What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > None, healthwise, unless you're a calorie counter.


    Exactly... although ironically most if not all 'low fat' yoghurts I've
    seen actually contain more carbohydrates (and so more fattening) than
    normal yoghurt. Kinda defeats the purpose...




    --
    "Some days we don't let the line move at all. We call those weekdays"
    Patty and Selma Bouvier, 1996

  14. #14
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:59:40 -0500, cybercat wrote:

    > "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> x-no-archive: yes
    >>
    >> Je├čus wrote:
    >>
    >>> What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> None, healthwise, unless you're a calorie counter.
    >>

    > Or have congestive heart failure or other disorders that do better with
    > a lower fat diet. I am not one of those low fat freaks, but it's just as
    > stupid to say that eating all the fat you want is just fine for
    > everyone, or that there are no benefits to low fat foods except lower
    > calories.
    >
    > Have you hears of atheriosclerosis?


    Have you heard of moderation? Just because a person dismisses the
    hysteria over 'fat', doesnt mean they also believe you should also eat
    "all the fat you want".






  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    Je├čus wrote:

    > Have you heard of moderation? Just because a person dismisses the
    > hysteria over 'fat', doesnt mean they also believe you should also eat
    > "all the fat you want".


    Fat means flavour, and low fat products are usually higher in sugars. I
    opt for small amounts of the high fat and full flavour.

  16. #16
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier


    "Je▀us" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gmt1vt$jos$[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:59:40 -0500, cybercat wrote:
    >
    >> "Susan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> x-no-archive: yes
    >>>
    >>> Je▀us wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> None, healthwise, unless you're a calorie counter.
    >>>

    >> Or have congestive heart failure or other disorders that do better with
    >> a lower fat diet. I am not one of those low fat freaks, but it's just as
    >> stupid to say that eating all the fat you want is just fine for
    >> everyone, or that there are no benefits to low fat foods except lower
    >> calories.
    >>
    >> Have you hears of atheriosclerosis?

    >
    > Have you heard of moderation? Just because a person dismisses the
    > hysteria over 'fat', doesnt mean they also believe you should also eat
    > "all the fat you want".
    >

    Susan was not dismissing the "hysteria over fat." She said that the only
    benefit lowfat yogurt has over full fat yogurt is for those "counting
    calories" meaning, those needing to lose weight. Horse ****.



  17. #17
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    x-no-archive: yes

    cybercat wrote:

    > Susan was not dismissing the "hysteria over fat."


    Keep your day job, you're no mindreader. I most certainly was
    dismissing the unfounded fat hysteria, though for those who have to
    count calories, it matters some, though not as much as other calories
    with more profound hormonal effects.


    She said that the only
    > benefit lowfat yogurt has over full fat yogurt is for those "counting
    > calories" meaning, those needing to lose weight. Horse ****.
    >
    >


    Fat doesn't cause heart disease, and neither does cholesterol. Certain
    lipid patterns are markers for metabolic imbalance, but most of the
    pathogenic ones are caused by excess glycemic load, not fat.

    All of your adrenal steroids, including sex hormones, are made from LDL
    cholesterol. Since steroids are suppressed by hyperinsulinemia, your
    body makes more LDL in response, in order to keep up the supply of hormones.

    The NIH is undertaking research based upon the presumption that LDL
    lowering causes adrenal suppression.

    Susan

  18. #18
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    x-no-archive: yes

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > Fat means flavour, and low fat products are usually higher in sugars. I
    > opt for small amounts of the high fat and full flavour.


    Me, too. Fats don't just mean flavor, they're essential in human
    nutrition, along with protein. Only fats and protein are essential in
    human nutrition.

    Lipids researchers don't believe it's possible to get enough EFAs for
    optimal immune and brain function on a diet of 30% calories from fat.

    Unless you overeat calories, I suppose.

    Susan

  19. #19
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier


    "Je▀us" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gmt1r3$jos$[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:54:57 -0500, Susan wrote:
    >
    >> x-no-archive: yes
    >>
    >> Je▀us wrote:
    >>
    >>> What benefit would low fat yoghurt have over normal untainted yoghurt?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> None, healthwise, unless you're a calorie counter.

    >
    > Exactly... although ironically most if not all 'low fat' yoghurts I've
    > seen actually contain more carbohydrates (and so more fattening) than
    > normal yoghurt. Kinda defeats the purpose...
    >

    Horse **** again. Whether excess carbs or fat make you gain depends on many
    factors. Your blanket demonizing of carbs is just as bad as the idiots who
    made two generations of kids afraid to eat any fat.



  20. #20
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Need help on eating healthier

    x-no-archive: yes

    cybercat wrote:

    > Or have congestive heart failure or other disorders that do better with a
    > lower fat diet.


    No, they don't, good research demonstrates. Fat is a good friend to
    heart patients and for preventing atherosclerosis in others. It's the
    starch and sugar, not the fat.

    I am not one of those low fat freaks, but it's just as
    > stupid to say that eating all the fat you want is just fine for everyone, or
    > that there are no benefits to low fat foods except lower calories. Have you
    > hears of atheriosclerosis?
    >
    >


    Yeah, have you ever heard of decent metabolic research?

    Susan

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