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Thread: necessary to add water?

  1. #1
    john d hamilton Guest

    Default necessary to add water?

    I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the most
    amount of its nutrients.

    It certainly tastes good this way. When I tried it, I just put a little
    brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.

    But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave, if
    there is practically nothing inside the microwave. Which is why for
    instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing some
    water.

    So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice



  2. #2
    itsjoannotjoann Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    On Oct 12, 5:16*am, "john d hamilton" <blues...@mail.invalid> wrote:
    > I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the most
    > amount of its nutrients.
    >
    > It certainly tastes good this way. *When I tried it, I just put a little
    > brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.
    >
    > But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave, if
    > there is practically nothing inside the microwave. *Which is why for
    > instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    > 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing some
    > water.
    >
    > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    > to be adding some water as well? * * * *Thanks for advice


    >
    >

    What is Brockely??

    Would it perhaps be broccoli and without being capitalized?

    Whenever you heat anything in the microwave do you always add water?
    No. That should answer your question about this vegetable. But
    personally I would and cover it and allow the small amount of water
    added to steam the broccoli.

  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article <gcsiqu$3se$[email protected]>,
    "john d hamilton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    > to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice


    Add a tablespoon or two and cover it with plastic wrap or waxed paper.
    Be certain to vent the plastic wrap. I cook vegetables in a
    Corningware dish with a glass cover.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

  4. #4
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    john d hamilton wrote:
    > I read very recently that Brockley
    >

    It's spelled broccoli.

    > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it
    > necessary to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice


    A couple of tablespoonfuls of water. And hey, maybe go wild and add a
    little salt & pepper! Cover with a lid (as in a covered corningware dish)
    or plastic wrap vented off to one side.

    Jill


  5. #5
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 11:16:37 +0100, john d hamilton wrote:

    > I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the most
    > amount of its nutrients.
    >
    > It certainly tastes good this way. When I tried it, I just put a little
    > brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.
    >
    > But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave, if
    > there is practically nothing inside the microwave. Which is why for
    > instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    > 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing some
    > water.
    >
    > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    > to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice


    Brockely will surely object if you do not.

    your pal,
    blake

  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <gcsiqu$3se$[email protected]>,
    > "john d hamilton" <bluestar@ma[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    > > to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice

    >
    > Add a tablespoon or two and cover it with plastic wrap or waxed paper.
    > Be certain to vent the plastic wrap. I cook vegetables in a
    > Corningware dish with a glass cover.


    Same here. Works well too. And yes, I always add a bit of water to
    steam or they tend to dry out. I add a LOT more water if I'm
    m-waving/steaming carrots. They take longer to cook.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > john d hamilton wrote:
    > > I read very recently that Brockley
    > >

    > It's spelled broccoli.
    >
    > > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it
    > > necessary to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice

    >
    > A couple of tablespoonfuls of water. And hey, maybe go wild and add a
    > little salt & pepper! Cover with a lid (as in a covered corningware dish)
    > or plastic wrap vented off to one side.
    >
    > Jill


    I steam it plain at first, then drain it and put it in a large bowl.
    Once it is drained, I usually add a little coconut or olive oil, salt
    free lemon pepper and dill weed. ;-d

    Poppy seeds also go well with Broccoli or carrots.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  8. #8
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    blake murphy wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 11:16:37 +0100, john d hamilton wrote:
    >
    >> I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the most
    >> amount of its nutrients.
    >>
    >> It certainly tastes good this way. When I tried it, I just put a little
    >> brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.
    >>
    >> But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave, if
    >> there is practically nothing inside the microwave. Which is why for
    >> instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    >> 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing some
    >> water.
    >>
    >> So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    >> to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice

    >
    > Brockely will surely object if you do not.


    And Brockley, as well (his first two tries). He must be buying generic
    (and random) food items in bags that just say, "Vejtabuls". But
    surprisingly, not posting from WebTV.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  9. #9
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    On Oct 12, 9:06*am, Blinky the Shark <no.s...@box.invalid> wrote:
    > blake murphy wrote:
    > > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 11:16:37 +0100, john d hamilton wrote:

    >
    > >> I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the most
    > >> amount of its nutrients.

    >
    > >> It certainly tastes good this way. *When I tried it, I just put a little
    > >> brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.

    >
    > >> But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave, if
    > >> there is practically nothing inside the microwave. *Which is why for
    > >> instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    > >> 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing some
    > >> water.

    >
    > >> So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    > >> to be adding some water as well? * * * *Thanks for advice

    >
    > > Brockely will surely object if you do not.

    >
    > And Brockley, as well (his first two tries). *He must be buying generic
    > (and random) food items in bags that just say, "Vejtabuls". *But
    > surprisingly, not posting from WebTV.
    >
    > --
    > Blinky
    > Killing all posts from Google Groups
    > The Usenet Improvement Project:http://improve-usenet.org
    > Need a new news feed? *http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html

    ===============================================
    Hey! Give the guy a break! Besides I kinda like that spelling.
    Brockley . . . sort of non-gendered; sounds like a great name for
    Bristol Palin's first child.
    ;-)
    Lynn in Fargo

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Lynn from Fargo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 12, 9:06*am, Blinky the Shark <no.s...@box.invalid> wrote:
    > > blake murphy wrote:
    > > > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 11:16:37 +0100, john d hamilton wrote:

    > >
    > > >> I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the
    > > >> most
    > > >> amount of its nutrients.

    > >
    > > >> It certainly tastes good this way. *When I tried it, I just put a little
    > > >> brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.

    > >
    > > >> But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave,
    > > >> if
    > > >> there is practically nothing inside the microwave. *Which is why for
    > > >> instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    > > >> 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing
    > > >> some
    > > >> water.

    > >
    > > >> So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it
    > > >> necessary
    > > >> to be adding some water as well? * * * *Thanks for advice

    > >
    > > > Brockely will surely object if you do not.

    > >
    > > And Brockley, as well (his first two tries). *He must be buying generic
    > > (and random) food items in bags that just say, "Vejtabuls". *But
    > > surprisingly, not posting from WebTV.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Blinky
    > > Killing all posts from Google Groups
    > > The Usenet Improvement Project:http://improve-usenet.org
    > > Need a new news feed? *http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html

    > ===============================================
    > Hey! Give the guy a break! Besides I kinda like that spelling.
    > Brockley . . . sort of non-gendered; sounds like a great name for
    > Bristol Palin's first child.
    > ;-)
    > Lynn in Fargo


    ROFL!!! Thanks for a good morning laugh!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  11. #11
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?


    Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    On Oct 12, 9:06 am, Blinky the Shark <no.s...@box.invalid> wrote:
    > blake murphy wrote:
    > > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 11:16:37 +0100, john d hamilton wrote:

    >
    > >> I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the

    most
    > >> amount of its nutrients.

    >
    > >> It certainly tastes good this way. When I tried it, I just put a little
    > >> brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.

    >
    > >> But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave,

    if
    > >> there is practically nothing inside the microwave. Which is why for
    > >> instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    > >> 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing

    some
    > >> water.

    >
    > >> So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it

    necessary
    > >> to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice

    >
    > > Brockely will surely object if you do not.

    >
    > And Brockley, as well (his first two tries). He must be buying generic
    > (and random) food items in bags that just say, "Vejtabuls". But
    > surprisingly, not posting from WebTV.
    >
    > --
    > Blinky
    > Killing all posts from Google Groups
    > The Usenet Improvement Project:http://improve-usenet.org
    > Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html

    ===============================================
    Hey! Give the guy a break! Besides I kinda like that spelling.
    Brockley . . . sort of non-gendered; sounds like a great name for
    Bristol Palin's first child.
    ;-)
    Lynn in Fargo
    ------------------
    GM replies:

    Lol...

    When I first read the d00d's post I thought, "What the hell is he talking
    about...???"...

    Speaking of d00d's names, I was checking out the Cosmo "50 Hottest Guys"
    thang the other day and some of the guys' first names were unbelievable, one
    poor mope was named "Tribble"! We used to laff at peeps in the inner city
    who coined wierd names for their offspring, but you couldn't get much
    stranger than what the Palins named their kids - and "Tribble"...!!! Musta
    been something in the water 20 or so years ago...


    --
    Best
    Greg



  12. #12
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> john d hamilton wrote:
    >>> I read very recently that Brockley
    >>>

    >> It's spelled broccoli.
    >>
    >>> So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it
    >>> necessary to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice

    >>
    >> A couple of tablespoonfuls of water. And hey, maybe go wild and add
    >> a little salt & pepper! Cover with a lid (as in a covered
    >> corningware dish) or plastic wrap vented off to one side.
    >>

    >
    > I steam it plain at first, then drain it and put it in a large bowl.
    > Once it is drained, I usually add a little coconut or olive oil, salt
    > free lemon pepper and dill weed. ;-d
    >

    I don't even put butter on broccoli, so oil? Not for me. I never did care
    for lemon pepper.

    Jill


  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> john d hamilton wrote:
    > >>> I read very recently that Brockley
    > >>>
    > >> It's spelled broccoli.
    > >>
    > >>> So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it
    > >>> necessary to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice
    > >>
    > >> A couple of tablespoonfuls of water. And hey, maybe go wild and add
    > >> a little salt & pepper! Cover with a lid (as in a covered
    > >> corningware dish) or plastic wrap vented off to one side.
    > >>

    > >
    > > I steam it plain at first, then drain it and put it in a large bowl.
    > > Once it is drained, I usually add a little coconut or olive oil, salt
    > > free lemon pepper and dill weed. ;-d
    > >

    > I don't even put butter on broccoli, so oil? Not for me. I never did care
    > for lemon pepper.
    >
    > Jill


    I use salt free lemon pepper. :-)

    The small amount of "raw", uncooked oil is good for essential fatty
    acids, and helps the herbals stick to the veggies.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  14. #14
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>

    >> I don't even put butter on broccoli, so oil? Not for me. I never
    >> did care for lemon pepper.

    >
    > I use salt free lemon pepper. :-)
    >
    > The small amount of "raw", uncooked oil is good for essential fatty
    > acids, and helps the herbals stick to the veggies.


    I'm not a big lemon pepper fan either. Heck, anything pepper-ish sends me
    running. But, Om, when you mean "raw" oil, you do mean tossing the veggies
    with the oil after they're cooked, correct? What is the nutritional
    difference between tossing with "raw" oil or using melting butter over the
    cooked veggies, then? There both a form of grease, so I'm asking out of
    curiosity. I really don't know, other than the question of cholesterol.

    I *always* butter my vegetables. My mom started it when I was growing up
    and now it's a habit I can't live without. It's only been recently that I
    started adding salt to the vegetables too, but I think that's because I
    always buy unsalted butter. I think my mom used salted.

    To me, you've *got* to have butter and salt on peas or corn.
    To me, you've *got* to have butter, salt and *cheese* on broccoli or
    cauliflower.
    Asparagus, brussels sprouts, spinach - I generally treat differently, as
    well as squash. (Although, I'll take my zucchini and yellow squash sliced
    thinly and sauteed in *butter and garlic* with freshly grated parmesan on
    the top, please! Yum, craving! Must be done again soon.)

    kili



  15. #15
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article <gcsiqu$3se$[email protected]>,
    "john d hamilton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I read very recently that Brockley cooked the microwave way retains the most
    > amount of its nutrients.
    >
    > It certainly tastes good this way. When I tried it, I just put a little
    > brockley in a glass bowl, and covered with a lid.
    >
    > But I have been told that you should not be switching on the microwave, if
    > there is practically nothing inside the microwave. Which is why for
    > instance if you want to 'test' if something is suitable as a microwave
    > 'container', you must also put inside with it; a cup or bowl containing some
    > water.
    >
    > So If i'm just microwaving a very small amount of Brockely, is it necessary
    > to be adding some water as well? Thanks for advice


    I'm not sure what a "very small amount" is. If it is a single serving,
    that should be fine.

    Raw broccoli is 89.3% water, so there is plenty of water in there
    without adding more. Still, I personally would add a teaspoon of water
    per serving, to "steam" the broccoli. I would guess that this would
    help cook it more evenly.

    http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

    [select "vegetables" and "broccoli"]

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  16. #16
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    In article <gd2hdr$f52$[email protected]>,
    "kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:


    > > I use salt free lemon pepper. :-)
    > >
    > > The small amount of "raw", uncooked oil is good for essential fatty
    > > acids, and helps the herbals stick to the veggies.

    >
    > I'm not a big lemon pepper fan either. Heck, anything pepper-ish sends me
    > running. But, Om, when you mean "raw" oil, you do mean tossing the veggies
    > with the oil after they're cooked, correct? What is the nutritional
    > difference between tossing with "raw" oil or using melting butter over the
    > cooked veggies, then? There both a form of grease, so I'm asking out of
    > curiosity. I really don't know, other than the question of cholesterol.


    There is some argument as to whether there is much of a relationship
    between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol. There is less of an
    argument about the relationship between dietary saturated fat and blood
    cholesterol. Most of the fat in butter is saturated.

    > I *always* butter my vegetables. My mom started it when I was growing up
    > and now it's a habit I can't live without. It's only been recently that I
    > started adding salt to the vegetables too, but I think that's because I
    > always buy unsalted butter. I think my mom used salted.


    If you add a little butter to your vegetables, I fail to see a problem.
    If they are swimming in butter, and especially if you see some drowning,
    perhaps it's time to cut back. I suspect your doctor is testing your
    cholesterol, sounds like everything else is getting tested. It's part
    of a regular fasting blood draw, or should be.

    > To me, you've *got* to have butter and salt on peas or corn.


    Well, yes, that's pretty obvious. We use salted butter, just because we
    do, so no salt. I add pepper to mine, but at the table, since my wife
    doesn't like pepper.

    > To me, you've *got* to have butter, salt and *cheese* on broccoli or
    > cauliflower.


    I've taken to using bottled mayo with my broccoli (and asparagus). We
    seldom have cauliflower, although when we do, generally for a holiday
    meal, we eat the whole head. I like a cheese sauce on it. It's just a
    plain white sauce with a tiny grating of nutmeg, then add shredded
    cheese and whisk while it melts into the sauce.

    > Asparagus, brussels sprouts, spinach - I generally treat differently, as
    > well as squash. (Although, I'll take my zucchini and yellow squash sliced
    > thinly and sauteed in *butter and garlic* with freshly grated parmesan on
    > the top, please! Yum, craving! Must be done again soon.)


    We had grated zucchini tonight with our spaghetti. Just grate the
    zucchini and add to a fry pan with some melted butter. It cooks down a
    lot. It doesn't really fry, since it releases so much water. It's more
    steamed than fried. It was really good.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  17. #17
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 22:01:35 -0700, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:




    >I've taken to using bottled mayo with my broccoli (and asparagus). We
    >seldom have cauliflower, although when we do, generally for a holiday
    >meal, we eat the whole head. I like a cheese sauce on it. It's just a
    >plain white sauce with a tiny grating of nutmeg, then add shredded
    >cheese and whisk while it melts into the sauce.
    >

    Ohmygawd..you have to try roasted cauliflower. Incredible. Slice it
    in wedges or pull apart into florets..then toss with a bit of olive
    oil (not too much) and a bit of salt and pepper. Not too much salt.
    Roast at 400 degrees til the florets/wedges start to brown and
    caramelize. It cooks down quite a bit, so one head might serve only
    two people. But it is so very, very good. Totally different
    vegetable.

    Christine

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: necessary to add water?

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 22:01:35 -0700, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >We had grated zucchini tonight with our spaghetti. Just grate the
    >zucchini and add to a fry pan with some melted butter. It cooks down a
    >lot. It doesn't really fry, since it releases so much water. It's more
    >steamed than fried. It was really good.


    That's a really good dish! I mix it with rigatoni and add some
    pecorino at the end.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

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