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Thread: Nearly Extinct Foods (was: REC: Crabbies)

  1. #41
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Nearly Extinct Foods (was: REC: Crabbies)

    "l, not -l" wrote:
    >
    > On 7-Oct-2012, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > zxcvbob wrote:
    > > >
    > > > George M. Middius wrote:
    > > > > Kswck wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >> Old English Cheese is one of those products that is destined for
    > > > >> extinction once the current generation gets older and moves on.
    > > > >
    > > > > You can buy sliced sharp cheddar. How is Olde Englishe different?
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > It's like Velveeta (but lower moisture) made out of extra sharp cheddar.

    > >
    > > It's mild cheddar, definitely not sharp. I just tasted it last week.
    > >
    > > G.

    > Sliced Old English? If so, where did you get it; my local cheesemonger
    > claims it went out of production several years ago.


    Oh, sorry. I was talking about the Old English spread that comes in a 5oz
    jar. I wasn't even aware that they sold slices...never seen it around here.

    As I mentioned in the original post (REC: Crabbies), I'd never tasted it
    right from the jar until recently. It was called for in that recipe and for
    all these years, I just added it in and assumed it had some unique flavor. I
    never even read the ingredient list.

    This time I did taste it first and was shocked/disappointed. It tastes
    exactly like sliced Kraft american processed cheese product. So I read the
    ingredients....it says, cheddar cheese (and some preservatives). It's
    definitely a mild cheddar though.

    Next time I make this recipe, I'll skip the overpriced Old English and shred
    in 5oz of extra sharp cheddar (from an 8oz bar). That extra flavor might
    take that crab recipe to a better level.

    G.

  2. #42
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Nearly Extinct Foods (was: REC: Crabbies)

    Gary wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "l, not -l" wrote:
    > >
    > > On 7-Oct-2012, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > zxcvbob wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > George M. Middius wrote:
    > > > > > Kswck wrote:
    > > > > >
    > > > > >> Old English Cheese is one of those products that is destined
    > > > > for >> extinction once the current generation gets older and
    > > > > moves on.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > You can buy sliced sharp cheddar. How is Olde Englishe
    > > > > > different?
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > It's like Velveeta (but lower moisture) made out of extra sharp
    > > > > cheddar.
    > > >
    > > > It's mild cheddar, definitely not sharp. I just tasted it last
    > > > week.
    > > >
    > > > G.

    > > Sliced Old English? If so, where did you get it; my local
    > > cheesemonger claims it went out of production several years ago.

    >
    > Oh, sorry. I was talking about the Old English spread that comes in a
    > 5oz jar. I wasn't even aware that they sold slices...never seen it
    > around here.
    >
    > As I mentioned in the original post (REC: Crabbies), I'd never tasted
    > it right from the jar until recently. It was called for in that
    > recipe and for all these years, I just added it in and assumed it had
    > some unique flavor. I never even read the ingredient list.
    >
    > This time I did taste it first and was shocked/disappointed. It tastes
    > exactly like sliced Kraft american processed cheese product. So I
    > read the ingredients....it says, cheddar cheese (and some
    > preservatives). It's definitely a mild cheddar though.
    >
    > Next time I make this recipe, I'll skip the overpriced Old English
    > and shred in 5oz of extra sharp cheddar (from an 8oz bar). That extra
    > flavor might take that crab recipe to a better level.
    >
    > G.


    They sell it in jars? I guess I never noticed that one!

    --


  3. #43
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Nearly Extinct Foods (was: REC: Crabbies)

    cshenk wrote:
    >
    > Gary wrote in rec.food.cooking:


    > > Oh, sorry. I was talking about the Old English spread that comes in a
    > > 5oz jar. I wasn't even aware that they sold slices...never seen it
    > > around here.

    >
    > They sell it in jars? I guess I never noticed that one!


    Strangely, the jars are never in the cheese section of the grocery stores.
    They stock them near the yogurt section. Don't waste your money though.
    Old English in a jar is an overpriced joke.

    G.

  4. #44
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Nearly Extinct Foods (was: REC: Crabbies)

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 05:14:34 -0400, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Strangely, the jars are never in the cheese section of the grocery stores.
    > They stock them near the yogurt section. spreadable Don't waste your money though.
    > Old English in a jar is an overpriced joke.


    This is the first time I've heard of anyone cooking with that stuff.
    I think the big concept is that it's spreadable (maybe it's the
    Northern answer to pimento cheese). Grandpa use to buy something
    similar, I think the brand was called Country Crock. It came in a
    real pottery crock and tasted pretty good when spread on a saltine.
    My dad used to like to put some sort of spreadable blue cheese on his
    turkey sandwiches. The reason I remember is because it came in a jar
    that mom turned into juice glasses when they were empty.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  5. #45
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Nearly Extinct Foods (was: REC: Crabbies)

    sf wrote:
    >
    > On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 05:14:34 -0400, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Strangely, the jars are never in the cheese section of the grocery stores.
    > > They stock them near the yogurt section. spreadable Don't waste your money though.
    > > Old English in a jar is an overpriced joke.

    >
    > This is the first time I've heard of anyone cooking with that stuff.


    I only used it for that one recipe. Funny too, I googled 'Old English
    crabs' yesterday and found many, many of the same recipies for "Aunt
    Bettie's crabbies." And most of them are the same exact recipe. She
    obviouly saw this recipe somewhere and eventually claimed it as her own
    family recipe.

    http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-...uffins,FF.html

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