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Thread: My supermarket experiences in the US

  1. #1
    Giusi Guest

    Default My supermarket experiences in the US

    Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot worse and
    some a lot better.

    Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to exist. It
    looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food. The ones I sampled
    in the stores were good, but I don't buy packaged food and I was very
    disappointed in the basic ingredients selection and shocked at some of the
    prices. $4.95 per pound for broccoli? At the absolute height of the
    season? $3.95 per pound for leeks? I don't think so.

    I shopped at Giant a few times. I saw the same problem that I often find
    here: dozens of choices of a few things and none whatsoever of other things.
    Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap to
    grow. Why so pricey?

    Mega Market was so much fun I would move next door. It was like a vacation
    in South America without a ticket. I loved it, although sanitation was
    probably on the low side and you have to want what they've got. They had
    Peruvian dried potatoes and many different chili peppers, so I was happy
    with them. I probably wouldn't buy meat from the butcher unless they
    cleaned the glass and got the splotches and fly spots off, though.

    Costco is what it is and isn't much changed. You never could do all your
    shopping there and you still can't, but those rotisseried chickens really
    are tasty. Their Pecorino Romano or Romano cheese is just horrible. I
    didn't know Italy made cheese that bad. It's fun tasting all the weekend
    specials, but not so much fun if you have to buy 3-5 pounds of it.

    Wegman's is what supermarkets need to be. Everything about it was easy and
    pleasant. Prices seemed right-- not cheap, for sure, but the days are over
    when really good food can be cheap. They make and explain the distinctions
    among specialty products. They, for example, had a separate stand for
    Parmigiano Reggiano and offered both 2 year old and stravecchio. They did
    not reveal the age of the stravecchio and I am used to every piece of
    Parmigiano having a labeled age. Still, just having it was a plus.
    They had areas just for French cheese and just for Italian cheeses, etc.
    That should help shoppers a bit.
    They were as much a food fair as a grocery in some ways. Lighting was
    great. Ordinary vegetables were next to the organic versions so you could
    see what difference you were paying.

    I didn't buy any meat, but it really looked good. Fish was noticeably fresh
    and pleasant.

    I was given a taste of a chocolate on chocolate cake that was just terrific.
    I certainly have never bought a supermarket cake that delicious, and many
    bakeries don't deliver that flavor.

    All the rest of my shopping over the two months was done at specialty shops.
    That was partly because of where I was staying. Chevy Chase is a close-in
    suburb with lots of specialty shops, but for supermarkets I could reach
    without a car only Giant and Trader Joe's. The other supermarketing was
    done semi-recreationally when my friend with a car went with.



  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:10:45 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot worse and
    > some a lot better.
    >
    > Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to exist. It
    > looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food.


    TJ's isn't as fun and interesting as it used to be. You probably
    never "knew" Trader Joe's in the olden days, but subsequent customers
    demanded consistency and that's what they got. It's just a shell of
    its former self because well off, entitled, Yuppies wanted to see the
    same products every time they shopped there. Money talks. My new
    favorite store, Rainbow grocery, is filled with rich, aging hippies
    and they cater to the crowd. That's how it goes in retail.

    > The ones I sampled
    > in the stores were good, but I don't buy packaged food and I was very
    > disappointed in the basic ingredients selection and shocked at some of the
    > prices. $4.95 per pound for broccoli? At the absolute height of the
    > season? $3.95 per pound for leeks? I don't think so.


    Hey, it's ORGANIC (plus torrential rainstorms in California have
    driven vegetable prices through the roof) and vendors have to meet TJ
    standards, which are very high, if they want to sell there. You get
    what you pay for.... or maybe not, but at TJ's you usually do.
    >
    > I shopped at Giant a few times. I saw the same problem that I often find
    > here: dozens of choices of a few things and none whatsoever of other things.
    > Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap to
    > grow. Why so pricey?
    >
    >
    > Costco is what it is and isn't much changed. You never could do all your
    > shopping there and you still can't, but those rotisseried chickens really
    > are tasty. Their Pecorino Romano or Romano cheese is just horrible. I
    > didn't know Italy made cheese that bad. It's fun tasting all the weekend
    > specials, but not so much fun if you have to buy 3-5 pounds of it.


    You go to Costco to buy in bulk. If you like the bulk product, you
    buy it. Otherwise you're screwed.
    >
    >
    > All the rest of my shopping over the two months was done at specialty shops.
    > That was partly because of where I was staying. Chevy Chase is a close-in
    > suburb with lots of specialty shops, but for supermarkets I could reach
    > without a car only Giant and Trader Joe's. The other supermarketing was
    > done semi-recreationally when my friend with a car went with.
    >

    It's sure different from shopping in Europe. European shopping is
    quaint and I wish we had more of that here. But all in all, I'm glad
    we have what we have with all the choices we have that go with it.
    It's not like you can find top quality at every shop on every bend
    over there either. I'd go crazy trying to live with all the
    limitations of being in one region or another in Europe. It's a nice
    place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there very long. Two
    years would be my limit.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:10:45 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot worse and
    >some a lot better.
    >
    >Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to exist. It
    >looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food. The ones I sampled
    >in the stores were good, but I don't buy packaged food and I was very
    >disappointed in the basic ingredients selection and shocked at some of the
    >prices. $4.95 per pound for broccoli? At the absolute height of the
    >season? $3.95 per pound for leeks? I don't think so.

    Trader Joes has never been a place to buy good inexpensive produce. I
    go there for decent basic ingredients, and not much else.
    >
    >I shopped at Giant a few times. I saw the same problem that I often find
    >here: dozens of choices of a few things and none whatsoever of other things.
    >Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap to
    >grow. Why so pricey?


    That's cause you shopped on the east coast, in the winter. Come to
    the west coast, and we can show you a whole different story.
    >
    >Mega Market was so much fun I would move next door. It was like a vacation
    >in South America without a ticket. I loved it, although sanitation was
    >probably on the low side and you have to want what they've got. They had
    >Peruvian dried potatoes and many different chili peppers, so I was happy
    >with them. I probably wouldn't buy meat from the butcher unless they
    >cleaned the glass and got the splotches and fly spots off, though.


    >Wegman's is what supermarkets need to be. Everything about it was easy and
    >pleasant. Prices seemed right-- not cheap, for sure, but the days are over
    >when really good food can be cheap. They make and explain the distinctions
    >among specialty products. They, for example, had a separate stand for
    >Parmigiano Reggiano and offered both 2 year old and stravecchio. They did
    >not reveal the age of the stravecchio and I am used to every piece of
    >Parmigiano having a labeled age. Still, just having it was a plus.
    >They had areas just for French cheese and just for Italian cheeses, etc.
    >That should help shoppers a bit.
    >They were as much a food fair as a grocery in some ways. Lighting was
    >great. Ordinary vegetables were next to the organic versions so you could
    >see what difference you were paying.


    Come to the bay area, and we can show you a lot more places like that.
    Have you ever seen Berkeley Bowl? Now that is a great place...and I
    think you would love it. Same with some other places in the bay area.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot worse and
    >> >>some a lot better.


    > That's cause you shopped on the east coast, in the winter. Come to> the
    > west coast, and we can show you a whole different story.


    I spent a lot of time on the West coast when I lived in the US. Part of
    what I was doing this year was experiencing what my readers experience.
    Real life wherever they are and having to buy and prepare food every day for
    a family. Only part of that allows for California.




  5. #5
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 12:09:24 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >I spent a lot of time on the West coast when I lived in the US. Part of
    >what I was doing this year was experiencing what my readers experience.
    >Real life wherever they are and having to buy and prepare food every day for
    >a family. Only part of that allows for California.


    Ahhh..I see. In NM, it can be a dismal experience as well. Even in
    summer. One just doesn't see the bounty of the markets that are there
    on the west coast.
    At the moment, I am back here in NM. While it is great to be in my
    own house with my stuff around me, I really miss the markets back in
    CA.
    Before I left CA two weeks ago I went to the farmers market and got a
    bag of blood oranges and meyer lemons to bring back here with me. I
    also got green garlic, that I have never seen here. Before I drove
    back here, I also got some stuff from the bay area markets, as I knew
    I wouldn't be able to find it back here with the quality and
    inexpensiveness I find in CA.

    We truly get spoiled on the west coast.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:10:45 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot worse and
    >some a lot better.
    >
    >Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to exist. It
    >looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food. The ones I sampled
    >in the stores were good, but I don't buy packaged food and I was very
    >disappointed in the basic ingredients...


    This is the way all markets here are going. Computer tracking and
    abundant research by manufacturers and by the stores themselves enable
    them to know exactly what sells. TJs has made the shift over the past
    2 years. Their German owners must be doing their homework, eh?

    Even King Arthur, whom I always used to regard as a source of only
    primary ingredients, certainly retains some of that within their
    business model, but mixes and additives are fast taking over their
    catalog.

    >.. selection and shocked at some of the
    >prices. $4.95 per pound for broccoli? At the absolute height of the
    >season? $3.95 per pound for leeks? I don't think so.
    >
    >I shopped at Giant a few times. I saw the same problem that I often find
    >here: dozens of choices of a few things and none whatsoever of other things.
    >Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap to
    >grow. Why so pricey?


    Recently we have seen soaring vegetable prices due to a freeze in
    Mexico.

    http://globalfreeze.wordpress.com/20...ices-increase/


    BUT, leeks have never been cheap, at least here in the NE. One cannot
    even be guaranteed to find them at all or in decent shape, if needed.
    I grow mine, but they obviously are not at the ready year-round.

    snip
    >
    >Costco is what it is and isn't much changed. You never could do all your
    >shopping there and you still can't, but those rotisseried chickens really
    >are tasty. Their Pecorino Romano or Romano cheese is just horrible. I
    >didn't know Italy made cheese that bad. It's fun tasting all the weekend
    >specials, but not so much fun if you have to buy 3-5 pounds of it.


    The Pecorino and Romano selections change during the year and come
    from different suppliers. Additionally, the supplies vary by US
    region. They recently had some sort of traveling cheese show come
    through, where the supplier set up special in-store tastings. My
    Costco had theirs about 6 weeks ago and I was unimpressed. The usual
    Costco cheese stock, though, can be absolutely different from such
    "special" offerings. They do this show business with fudge and
    cheescakes, too, and one or two other items, as I recall.

    (about Wegmans...)
    >I didn't buy any meat, but it really looked good. Fish was noticeably fresh
    >and pleasant.


    Alas, I will not buy any fish from a regular grocery store. Just my
    own hang-up. Surprisingly, I have had the bet luck with frozen fish
    from Trader Joe's Go figure. For years they carried the most flavorful
    and delicate Dover sole I had ever eaten. We had it once a week, at
    least. Lately it has disappeared. I am sad.

    >I was given a taste of a chocolate on chocolate cake that was just terrific.
    >I certainly have never bought a supermarket cake that delicious, and many
    >bakeries don't deliver that flavor.


    Almost all of what Wegman's offers up from the bakery is from mixes,
    partially made or frozen. TH's company did a lot of work at a company
    that supplied much of this.
    >
    >All the rest of my shopping over the two months was done at specialty shops.
    >That was partly because of where I was staying. Chevy Chase is a close-in
    >suburb with lots of specialty shops, but for supermarkets I could reach
    >without a car only Giant and Trader Joe's. The other supermarketing was
    >done semi-recreationally when my friend with a car went with.
    >

    I use markets for fun and frolic. Large chain groceries are used for
    fat milk runs, or to pick up some basics when we run out, or to catch
    some fabulous special. I get my meats at Costco or a specialty
    butcher, although one local grocery has some nice things once in
    awhile (only place I can get veal breast for stuffing and roasting).

    Paper goods are from Costco, as is laundry soap, most fruits and
    berries and bananas. Even I, who prefer to buy in bulk, cannot use up
    5lbs of organic baby carrots, though, nor 20 lbs of potatoes.

    We are blessed with many small ethnic markets here in NJ...Italian,
    Asian, Middle Eastern, Indian, Caribbean. I do a lot of my shopping
    there. These places stock their shelves with what the "natives" want,
    not for an American, speed demon, get-the-food-on-the-table so we can
    get Michael to soccer, Brittany to the tutor, and still make the PTA
    meeting and catch up on office emails market.

    Times change. Slow food is just not the norm here (except in my house,
    where time stands still). Somebody is out there buying all those
    Pringles.

    Boron

  7. #7
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    Giusi wrote:

    > Wegman's is what supermarkets need to be. Everything about it was
    > easy and pleasant. Prices seemed right-- not cheap, for sure, but
    > the days are over when really good food can be cheap. They make and
    > explain the distinctions among specialty products. They, for
    > example, had a separate stand for Parmigiano Reggiano and offered
    > both 2 year old and stravecchio. They did not reveal the age of the
    > stravecchio and I am used to every piece of Parmigiano having a
    > labeled age. Still, just having it was a plus.
    > They had areas just for French cheese and just for Italian cheeses,
    > etc. That should help shoppers a bit.
    > They were as much a food fair as a grocery in some ways. Lighting was
    > great. Ordinary vegetables were next to the organic versions so you
    > could see what difference you were paying.
    >
    > I didn't buy any meat, but it really looked good. Fish was
    > noticeably fresh and pleasant.


    Wegman's is a treat. I am lucky to live pretty close to two of them,
    however, not close enough to make them my main shopping stop
    but I go there once in a while. If you're a busy person, their prepared
    foods are terrific, too. Great bakery, as you said.

    nancy

  8. #8
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 05:19:40 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 12:09:24 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I spent a lot of time on the West coast when I lived in the US. Part of
    >>what I was doing this year was experiencing what my readers experience.
    >>Real life wherever they are and having to buy and prepare food every day for
    >>a family. Only part of that allows for California.

    >
    >Ahhh..I see. In NM, it can be a dismal experience as well. Even in
    >summer. One just doesn't see the bounty of the markets that are there
    >on the west coast.
    >At the moment, I am back here in NM. While it is great to be in my
    >own house with my stuff around me, I really miss the markets back in
    >CA.
    >Before I left CA two weeks ago I went to the farmers market and got a
    >bag of blood oranges and meyer lemons to bring back here with me. I
    >also got green garlic, that I have never seen here. Before I drove
    >back here, I also got some stuff from the bay area markets, as I knew
    >I wouldn't be able to find it back here with the quality and
    >inexpensiveness I find in CA.
    >
    >We truly get spoiled on the west coast.
    >
    >Christine



    Have you enough moisture to grow garlic is unattended - that is, you
    go out on assignment somewhere?

    Truly, it is easy to grow, and you can get a triple-use crop from
    it...early scapes, then green garlic, then ripe and ready to dry later
    on in the season.

    Although it is best to start with a purchased seed crop, once that is
    harvested, you have your own stock to use.

  9. #9
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:10:45 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot worse and
    >> some a lot better.
    >>
    >> Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to exist. It
    >> looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food.

    >
    > TJ's isn't as fun and interesting as it used to be. You probably
    > never "knew" Trader Joe's in the olden days, but subsequent customers
    > demanded consistency and that's what they got. It's just a shell of
    > its former self because well off, entitled, Yuppies wanted to see the
    > same products every time they shopped there. Money talks. My new
    > favorite store, Rainbow grocery, is filled with rich, aging hippies
    > and they cater to the crowd. That's how it goes in retail.


    TJ's is owned by Aldi. I'm not sure of its origins, but I think it is
    evolving to a high priced Aldi.


  10. #10
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    Christine Dabney> <[email protected]>

    I>also got green garlic, that I have never seen here.

    > Explain to the uninitiated what green garlic is. Is it something like>
    > green onions? What do you use them for?


    Yes, much like. This time of year begins the green top growth of garlic
    which won't be mature enough to season and dry until Juneish. They taste
    different to mature garlic, so you need to figure out where they belong, if
    they do, in your dishes. I like them replacing onion in potato dishes, for
    example, but I don't like them for replacing garlic in say a salad.



  11. #11
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 05:19:40 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 12:09:24 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I spent a lot of time on the West coast when I lived in the US. Part of
    >>what I was doing this year was experiencing what my readers experience.
    >>Real life wherever they are and having to buy and prepare food every day for
    >>a family. Only part of that allows for California.

    >
    >Ahhh..I see. In NM, it can be a dismal experience as well. Even in
    >summer. One just doesn't see the bounty of the markets that are there
    >on the west coast.
    >At the moment, I am back here in NM. While it is great to be in my
    >own house with my stuff around me, I really miss the markets back in
    >CA.
    >Before I left CA two weeks ago I went to the farmers market and got a
    >bag of blood oranges and meyer lemons to bring back here with me. I
    >also got green garlic, that I have never seen here. Before I drove
    >back here, I also got some stuff from the bay area markets, as I knew
    >I wouldn't be able to find it back here with the quality and
    >inexpensiveness I find in CA.
    >
    >We truly get spoiled on the west coast.
    >
    >Christine


    Explain to the uninitiated what green garlic is. Is it something like
    green onions? What do you use them for?

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  12. #12
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 13:17:22 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"The Cook" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >Christine Dabney> <[email protected]>
    >
    > I>also got green garlic, that I have never seen here.
    >
    >> Explain to the uninitiated what green garlic is. Is it something like>
    >> green onions? What do you use them for?

    >
    >Yes, much like. This time of year begins the green top growth of garlic
    >which won't be mature enough to season and dry until Juneish. They taste
    >different to mature garlic, so you need to figure out where they belong, if
    >they do, in your dishes. I like them replacing onion in potato dishes, for
    >example, but I don't like them for replacing garlic in say a salad.
    >


    Thanks. I will pull up one or two to see what they are like.

    The curb market here gets green Vidalia onions about this time of
    year. I used some as a substitute for leeks, which no grocery around
    here carries. They are the kind of thing I would have to plan for and
    get when we get to the "city."
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  13. #13
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On 2011-03-26, Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap to
    > grow. Why so pricey?


    It's whatever the mkt will bear. Would you believe $3.85 EACH! for
    organic persimmons? Leeks are not well known to US cooks, so have
    alway been pricey, IME.

    nb

  14. #14
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US


    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 2011-03-26, Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap
    >> to
    >> grow. Why so pricey?

    >
    > It's whatever the mkt will bear. Would you believe $3.85 EACH! for
    > organic persimmons? Leeks are not well known to US cooks, so have
    > alway been pricey, IME.
    >
    > nb



    I can barely find leeks for my signature potato-leek soup. The ones I do
    manage to find are rather puny, like slightly overgrown green onions. It's
    weird, I had better vegetable choices at the grocery store in TN than I do
    here in SC. You'd think it would be the other way around since we have a
    longer growing season.

    Jill


  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On 26 Mar 2011 14:47:31 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2011-03-26, Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Leeks were almost as expensive at Giant, too. Leeks are easy and cheap to
    >> grow. Why so pricey?

    >
    >It's whatever the mkt will bear. Would you believe $3.85 EACH! for
    >organic persimmons? Leeks are not well known to US cooks, so have
    >alway been pricey, IME.


    Leeks are well known to US cooks... that's not why they're pricy.

    Leeks are not easy and cheap to grow, they require special growing
    conditions... leeks generally won't grow in the typical home garden
    anywhere in the US. Leeks need an exceptionally long growing season
    of cool temperatures and they are very labor intensive, they require
    constant blanching (the careful piling of soil to protect from light).
    Leeks also don't store well (not like dry onions) so there's excessive
    spoilage. Also leeks are not popular in many regions, this also
    significantly contributes to spoilage on the shelf. In the US one
    doesn't find large displays of leeks at the green grocer, they're just
    not all that popular. In the US leeks are mainly considered a soup
    vegetable and oniony soups are not very popular in the US, nor are
    most oniony dishes. There are many other ways to cook leeks but
    again, the US palate is not all that fond of oniony dishes.. try to
    think of the last time you served your family creamed or braised
    onions, even fried onion rings are not all that popular... most don't
    want onions in their salads or even on a burger, which is why
    restaurants typically serve onion on the side or it needs to be
    requested. I happen to like onions but still I don't buy leeks, I can
    substitute other onions quite nicely... and leeks besides being pricy
    contain a lot of waste... leeks are really two separate vegetables,
    most folks use the tender white portion but few bother with the tough
    green parts.

  16. #16
    Dan Goodman Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    Giusi wrote:

    > All the rest of my shopping over the two months was done at specialty
    > shops. That was partly because of where I was staying. Chevy Chase
    > is a close-in suburb with lots of specialty shops, but for
    > supermarkets I could reach without a car only Giant and Trader Joe's.
    > The other supermarketing was done semi-recreationally when my friend
    > with a car went with.


    I live one light rail station away from three supermarkets: Cub,
    Rainbow, and Aldi. The first two have a fair amount of immigrant food;
    for example, the Cub has injera (the Ethiopian bread which looks like a
    sponge.)

    Their Hispanic sections are interesting mixtures. Taco Bell sauces,
    and other Americanized stuff; imports from Mexico; and Hispanic foods
    made in the US. (Including spaghetti; I don't know if it's any
    different from American spaghetti except for the labels being partly in
    Spanish.)

    Supermarkets in more prosperous areas of Minneapolis have much smaller
    selections of such foods.

    --
    Dan Goodman
    dsgood at lj, dw, ij, fb, tw__

  17. #17
    Dan Goodman Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    > > On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:10:45 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > Things have changed a lot in ten years. Some things are a lot
    > > > worse and some a lot better.
    > > >
    > > > Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to
    > > > exist. It looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food.

    > >
    > > TJ's isn't as fun and interesting as it used to be. You probably
    > > never "knew" Trader Joe's in the olden days, but subsequent
    > > customers demanded consistency and that's what they got. It's just
    > > a shell of its former self because well off, entitled, Yuppies
    > > wanted to see the same products every time they shopped there.
    > > Money talks. My new favorite store, Rainbow grocery, is filled
    > > with rich, aging hippies and they cater to the crowd. That's how
    > > it goes in retail.

    >
    > TJ's is owned by Aldi. I'm not sure of its origins, but I think it
    > is evolving to a high priced Aldi.


    I believe it's actually owned by another branch of the family which
    owns Aldi.

    --
    Dan Goodman
    dsgood at lj, dw, ij, fb, tw__

  18. #18
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On 2011-03-26, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > Leeks are well known to US cooks...


    Sure they are.....

    Mac n' cheese n' leeks.
    Tuna leek casserole
    BBQ chicken, baked beans w/ leaks
    Burger, shake, n' leeks
    Turkey, stuffing, yams, n' creamed leeks
    Bacon, eggs, n' leeks
    Chili con leeks.

    GTFOH!

    nb


  19. #19
    none of your business Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    On Mar 26, 6:10*am, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Things have changed a lot in ten years. *Some things are a lot worse and
    > some a lot better.
    >
    > Trader Joe's nowadays doesn't seem to have a lot of reason to exist. *It
    > looked to me as if they are mostly about prepared food. *The ones I sampled
    > in the stores were good, but I don't buy packaged food and I was very
    > disappointed in the basic ingredients selection and shocked at some of the
    > prices. *$4.95 per pound for broccoli? *At the absolute height of the
    > season? *$3.95 per pound for leeks? *I don't think so.


    leeks are not all that popular here in the US. That accounts for their
    high price. They are considered a "gourmet" item. They are not widely
    used in the mainstream.

  20. #20
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: My supermarket experiences in the US

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > without a car only Giant and Trader Joe's. The other supermarketing was
    > done semi-recreationally when my friend with a car went with.


    Have you been hiding the fact that you're from Minnesota? <grin> We
    get slammed for that sentence construction: ". . . went with." The
    follow-up is always "Went with who? Went with what?"

    I hope you had a good visit in the U.S. of A.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

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