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Thread: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    Thanks to Tonia Fischer for telling me about
    the Chicken Bucket! I won't hold her responsible
    for any 3rd degree burns that may result.

    Including shipping, it was a little less than
    $30 for a 6-quart version. That's a good price!
    I was outbid for a 4-quart version (still sealed
    in its original box) that went for $100, not
    including shipping. Another 6-quart version
    that I had my eye on was sold on a Buy-It-Now
    for $69 and some change, not including shipping.
    Many are offered on eBay, but many are looking
    for them. I got lucky because the seller misspelled
    "bucket". I was the only bidder.

    I'm trying to think what besides chicken would
    benefit from deep frying under pressure. Due to
    my tendency toward gout, I can't eat more than
    one chicken breast in a day. Fried food really
    needs to be eaten right away, and just about
    anything I make would overrun my meat intake
    limit, if I made a full batch. If I wait until
    I have company to use it, that could be a long
    wait. Chicken breast practically screams "dry",
    so obviously it benefits the most. But what else
    would benefit from keeping the moisture in?
    Prawns would be good. Maybe duck, though I can't
    remember ever seeing deep-fried duck. Oh, squid!
    Of course! I bet this thing can make good squid!
    Clams, too! And oysters!

    Deep-fried mushrooms don't really have a problem
    with retaining moisture -- all the ones I've made
    were nice and moist. Are there any vegetables
    that would normally be considered unsuitable for
    deep frying, but would be suitable if broasted?

    I might wait until the rainy season and do my
    first experiments outside over the barbeque.
    That would avoid any risk of unpleasant accidents
    in the kitchen. The gasket seems to be in good
    condition, but better safe than sorry, especially
    when there's lots of oil under pressure over a
    flame.

  2. #2
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > Prawns would be good. Maybe duck, though I can't
    > remember ever seeing deep-fried duck. Oh, squid!
    > Of course! I bet this thing can make good squid!
    > Clams, too! And oysters!


    Wouldn't the seafood be way overcooked using this method? Seems they
    only need to cook for two minutes to begin with; bringing it up to
    pressure and frying and then releasing pressure seems like it would cook
    the living daylights out of the stuff.

    Serene
    --
    "I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    Serene Vannoy wrote:
    >
    > Wouldn't the seafood be way overcooked using this method? Seems they
    > only need to cook for two minutes to begin with; bringing it up to
    > pressure and frying and then releasing pressure seems like it would cook
    > the living daylights out of the stuff.


    Hmmm... yes, I guess so. Maybe this thing is only
    good for chicken. Maybe chicken-fried steak or
    a breaded pork cutlet would be more suitable.
    Ah yes, pork cutlet tends to be dry, for example
    in tonkatsu. I'm not overfond of chicken breast,
    but I love tonkatsu.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonkatsu

    Oh, yeah! Just looking at that picture reminds me
    of how dry tonkatsu tends to be. Odd that there's
    no sauce over the one in the picture. All the
    tonkatsu I've ever had had a stripe of sauce
    across it.

  4. #4
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonkatsu
    >
    > Oh, yeah! Just looking at that picture reminds me
    > of how dry tonkatsu tends to be. Odd that there's
    > no sauce over the one in the picture. All the
    > tonkatsu I've ever had had a stripe of sauce
    > across it.


    When we ate it in a home in Tokyo, they bought the ton katsu at a stand
    down the street, then the mother sliced each one into strips to serve
    it, and they put a bottle of commercial ton katsu sauce on the table the
    way we would do with ketchup or something.

    Serene
    --
    "I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef

  5. #5
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    On Tue 01 Jul 2008 04:25:55p, Mark Thorson told us...

    > Thanks to Tonia Fischer for telling me about
    > the Chicken Bucket! I won't hold her responsible
    > for any 3rd degree burns that may result.
    >
    > Including shipping, it was a little less than
    > $30 for a 6-quart version. That's a good price!
    > I was outbid for a 4-quart version (still sealed
    > in its original box) that went for $100, not
    > including shipping. Another 6-quart version
    > that I had my eye on was sold on a Buy-It-Now
    > for $69 and some change, not including shipping.
    > Many are offered on eBay, but many are looking
    > for them. I got lucky because the seller misspelled
    > "bucket". I was the only bidder.
    >
    > I'm trying to think what besides chicken would
    > benefit from deep frying under pressure. Due to
    > my tendency toward gout, I can't eat more than
    > one chicken breast in a day. Fried food really
    > needs to be eaten right away, and just about
    > anything I make would overrun my meat intake
    > limit, if I made a full batch. If I wait until
    > I have company to use it, that could be a long
    > wait. Chicken breast practically screams "dry",
    > so obviously it benefits the most. But what else
    > would benefit from keeping the moisture in?
    > Prawns would be good. Maybe duck, though I can't
    > remember ever seeing deep-fried duck. Oh, squid!
    > Of course! I bet this thing can make good squid!
    > Clams, too! And oysters!
    >
    > Deep-fried mushrooms don't really have a problem
    > with retaining moisture -- all the ones I've made
    > were nice and moist. Are there any vegetables
    > that would normally be considered unsuitable for
    > deep frying, but would be suitable if broasted?
    >
    > I might wait until the rainy season and do my
    > first experiments outside over the barbeque.
    > That would avoid any risk of unpleasant accidents
    > in the kitchen. The gasket seems to be in good
    > condition, but better safe than sorry, especially
    > when there's lots of oil under pressure over a
    > flame.
    >


    Mark, I think most of the foods you mentioned besides chicken cook too
    quickly to survive being cooked in the chicken bucket. They would probably
    be very overdone.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Tuesday, 07(VII)/01(I)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Canada Day
    -------------------------------------------
    Yesterday a postal worker asked me
    what type of handgun he should buy.
    -------------------------------------------



  6. #6
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    On Tue 01 Jul 2008 05:00:27p, Mark Thorson told us...

    > Serene Vannoy wrote:
    >>
    >> Wouldn't the seafood be way overcooked using this method? Seems they
    >> only need to cook for two minutes to begin with; bringing it up to
    >> pressure and frying and then releasing pressure seems like it would cook
    >> the living daylights out of the stuff.

    >
    > Hmmm... yes, I guess so. Maybe this thing is only
    > good for chicken. Maybe chicken-fried steak or
    > a breaded pork cutlet would be more suitable.
    > Ah yes, pork cutlet tends to be dry, for example
    > in tonkatsu. I'm not overfond of chicken breast,
    > but I love tonkatsu.


    Now you're talking. Chicken fried steak or breaded pork cutlet would
    probably work quite well. Uh, why does it have to be chicken *breast*?
    Legs and things would be much tastier.

    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonkatsu
    >
    > Oh, yeah! Just looking at that picture reminds me
    > of how dry tonkatsu tends to be. Odd that there's
    > no sauce over the one in the picture. All the
    > tonkatsu I've ever had had a stripe of sauce
    > across it.
    >




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Tuesday, 07(VII)/01(I)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Canada Day
    -------------------------------------------
    Yesterday a postal worker asked me
    what type of handgun he should buy.
    -------------------------------------------



  7. #7
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Thanks to Tonia Fischer for telling me about
    > the Chicken Bucket! I won't hold her responsible
    > for any 3rd degree burns that may result.
    >
    > Including shipping, it was a little less than
    > $30 for a 6-quart version. That's a good price!
    > I was outbid for a 4-quart version (still sealed
    > in its original box) that went for $100, not
    > including shipping. Another 6-quart version
    > that I had my eye on was sold on a Buy-It-Now
    > for $69 and some change, not including shipping.
    > Many are offered on eBay, but many are looking
    > for them. I got lucky because the seller misspelled
    > "bucket". I was the only bidder.
    >
    > I'm trying to think what besides chicken would
    > benefit from deep frying under pressure. Due to
    > my tendency toward gout, I can't eat more than
    > one chicken breast in a day. Fried food really
    > needs to be eaten right away, and just about
    > anything I make would overrun my meat intake
    > limit, if I made a full batch. If I wait until
    > I have company to use it, that could be a long
    > wait. Chicken breast practically screams "dry",
    > so obviously it benefits the most. But what else
    > would benefit from keeping the moisture in?
    > Prawns would be good. Maybe duck, though I can't
    > remember ever seeing deep-fried duck. Oh, squid!
    > Of course! I bet this thing can make good squid!
    > Clams, too! And oysters!
    >
    > Deep-fried mushrooms don't really have a problem
    > with retaining moisture -- all the ones I've made
    > were nice and moist. Are there any vegetables
    > that would normally be considered unsuitable for
    > deep frying, but would be suitable if broasted?
    >
    > I might wait until the rainy season and do my
    > first experiments outside over the barbeque.
    > That would avoid any risk of unpleasant accidents
    > in the kitchen. The gasket seems to be in good
    > condition, but better safe than sorry, especially
    > when there's lots of oil under pressure over a
    > flame.



    I had never even heard of a "chicken bucket" until now. I'm a weenie, the
    idea of all that hot oil under pressure no less, just makes me cringe. I
    remember in college my roommate used a pressure cooker for many things. One
    day I heard a loud "KABOOOOM" sound. She was opening the contraption while
    it still had pressure. She barely escaped serious injury from the steam and
    contents. The mess was incredible. To think of all that boiling oil in one
    of those things just makes me shiver all over.

    Paul



  8. #8
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
    >
    > I had never even heard of a "chicken bucket" until now. I'm a weenie, the
    > idea of all that hot oil under pressure no less, just makes me cringe. I
    > remember in college my roommate used a pressure cooker for many things. One
    > day I heard a loud "KABOOOOM" sound. She was opening the contraption while
    > it still had pressure. She barely escaped serious injury from the steam and
    > contents. The mess was incredible. To think of all that boiling oil in one
    > of those things just makes me shiver all over.


    When it comes to food, we are fearless.

    Who do you suppose ate the first oyster?

  9. #9
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
    >>
    >> I had never even heard of a "chicken bucket" until now. I'm a weenie,
    >> the
    >> idea of all that hot oil under pressure no less, just makes me cringe. I
    >> remember in college my roommate used a pressure cooker for many things.
    >> One
    >> day I heard a loud "KABOOOOM" sound. She was opening the contraption
    >> while
    >> it still had pressure. She barely escaped serious injury from the steam
    >> and
    >> contents. The mess was incredible. To think of all that boiling oil in
    >> one
    >> of those things just makes me shiver all over.

    >
    > When it comes to food, we are fearless.
    >
    > Who do you suppose ate the first oyster?


    Nelson Rockefeller?

    Paul



  10. #10
    CC Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:g4ehpu$qcn$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Thanks to Tonia Fischer for telling me about
    >> the Chicken Bucket! I won't hold her responsible
    >> for any 3rd degree burns that may result.
    >>
    >> Including shipping, it was a little less than
    >> $30 for a 6-quart version. That's a good price!
    >> I was outbid for a 4-quart version (still sealed
    >> in its original box) that went for $100, not
    >> including shipping. Another 6-quart version
    >> that I had my eye on was sold on a Buy-It-Now
    >> for $69 and some change, not including shipping.
    >> Many are offered on eBay, but many are looking
    >> for them. I got lucky because the seller misspelled
    >> "bucket". I was the only bidder.
    >>
    >> I'm trying to think what besides chicken would
    >> benefit from deep frying under pressure. Due to
    >> my tendency toward gout, I can't eat more than
    >> one chicken breast in a day. Fried food really
    >> needs to be eaten right away, and just about
    >> anything I make would overrun my meat intake
    >> limit, if I made a full batch. If I wait until
    >> I have company to use it, that could be a long
    >> wait. Chicken breast practically screams "dry",
    >> so obviously it benefits the most. But what else
    >> would benefit from keeping the moisture in?



    I've used mine to cook center cut pork chops and they have always
    come out really good
    CC



  11. #11
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    CC wrote:
    >
    > I've used mine to cook center cut pork chops and they have always
    > come out really good


    Do you deep fry them? I know porkchops are often
    fried, but I've never heard of deep frying them.
    (Though it wouldn't surprise me a bit if people
    did that.)

    Certainly, pork loin has a tendency toward dryness
    exceeded by little other than chicken breasts.

  12. #12
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > CC wrote:
    >>
    >> I've used mine to cook center cut pork chops and they have always
    >> come out really good

    >
    > Do you deep fry them? I know porkchops are often
    > fried, but I've never heard of deep frying them.
    > (Though it wouldn't surprise me a bit if people
    > did that.)
    >
    > Certainly, pork loin has a tendency toward dryness
    > exceeded by little other than chicken breasts.


    Deep fried pork chops are very common in Asia. I see them often in
    Vietnamese restauramts. They are sliced pretty thin and seasoned then deep
    fried.

    Paul



  13. #13
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: My Chicken Bucket Arrived Today !!!

    On Wed, 2 Jul 2008 17:09:34 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> CC wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I've used mine to cook center cut pork chops and they have always
    >>> come out really good

    >>
    >> Do you deep fry them? I know porkchops are often
    >> fried, but I've never heard of deep frying them.
    >> (Though it wouldn't surprise me a bit if people
    >> did that.)
    >>
    >> Certainly, pork loin has a tendency toward dryness
    >> exceeded by little other than chicken breasts.

    >
    >Deep fried pork chops are very common in Asia. I see them often in
    >Vietnamese restauramts. They are sliced pretty thin and seasoned then deep
    >fried.
    >
    >Paul
    >


    japanese tonkatsu as well.

    your pal,
    blake

    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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