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Thread: Mustard Makings

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Mustard Makings

    Random Questions about Making Mustard

    I've heard that making mustard with 'mustard flour' isn't good because
    mustard flour is actually the bran from the seed, and don't contain
    much, if any, actual seed. But the sites I just read are implying
    mustard flour is just ground mustard seed.

    And then confuse matters, manufacturers list "mustard" when they are
    in fact using mustard _bran_ as an emulsifier (such as mayonnaise).

    When you buy mustard seed, is the bran in tact on the seed or removed?

    Why would buying pre-ground mustard seed give more immediate taste
    results than grinding your own mustard seeds at home, pre-soaked or
    not? One site says that if you use mustard flour you need to only
    wait 10 minutes for flavor to develop as opposed to 4-30 days with
    whole seeds.

    Then I gave up reading random websites. Too much web-reading can just
    be confusing.

    I plan to use whole mustard seeds, both yellow and black for most
    preps. Which one is hotter/more flavorful? How about Black? (I do
    see three shades at the Indian grocer.

    Is Coleman's mustard powder simply ground yellow mustard? I have
    never had Coleman's. Or bangers. They're so un-American.

    What beer is best for making mustard? I bought a bottle of Baltic
    Porter a few weeks ago with mustard in mind, and I still haven't drank
    it so that means it really was meant for making mustard (no Denial
    syndrome here).

    I assume I can use any vinegar, flavored or not, assuming it's around
    5% (and mustard contains anti-bacterial properties anyway). I
    probably don't see Balsamic mustard for a reason, because it looks
    like hell. Any other reason?

    Any other mustard tips? I'm going to the Indian grocer tomorrow pick
    up a half pound (or so) of each. I use too much expensive mustard
    that comes in those tiny 4-serving jars. Time to perfect my own. How
    does cocoa and star-anise sound?

    -sw

  2. #2
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 21:10:35 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > Random Questions about Making Mustard
    >
    > I've heard that making mustard with 'mustard flour' isn't good because
    > mustard flour is actually the bran from the seed, and don't contain
    > much, if any, actual seed. But the sites I just read are implying
    > mustard flour is just ground mustard seed.
    >
    > And then confuse matters, manufacturers list "mustard" when they are
    > in fact using mustard _bran_ as an emulsifier (such as mayonnaise).
    >
    > When you buy mustard seed, is the bran in tact on the seed or removed?
    >
    > Why would buying pre-ground mustard seed give more immediate taste
    > results than grinding your own mustard seeds at home, pre-soaked or
    > not? One site says that if you use mustard flour you need to only
    > wait 10 minutes for flavor to develop as opposed to 4-30 days with
    > whole seeds.
    >
    > Then I gave up reading random websites. Too much web-reading can just
    > be confusing.


    well, i don't know if this be random or not, but there's a collection here:

    <http://www.melborponsti.com/inxmtd.html>

    i hope we'll hear about the results of your quest.

    your pal,
    blake

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 12:09:36 -0400, blake murphy wrote:

    > i hope we'll hear about the results of your quest.


    Oh sure. Nobody wants to help turn my grain into something useful,
    but they'll like to reap the rewards of my efforts!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lit...n#Plot_summary

    Nobody makes mustard in a cooking group? I guess I'm just charting
    new territory with everything I do.

    I have 18lbs of whole short ribs to smoke tomorrow. None of those
    wimpy beef spare ribs for me. Short ribs only cost $.01 more a pound
    when bought in bulk and take up less room on the smoker.

    I suppose everybody does this, too.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 21:49:27 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Nobody makes mustard in a cooking group? I guess I'm just charting
    >new territory with everything I do.


    Yes, Pam Day makes mustard. I hope she sees your posts. She is known
    for making wonderful mustards...

    She is also on FB.. You can find her through my friends...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 21:49:27 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 12:09:36 -0400, blake murphy wrote:
    >
    >> i hope we'll hear about the results of your quest.

    >
    >Oh sure. Nobody wants to help turn my grain into something useful,
    >but they'll like to reap the rewards of my efforts!
    >
    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lit...n#Plot_summary


    That's not accurate. The political version can't be attributable to
    Ronald Reagan, least not during his Presidency... I posted that
    version, a few times, I got it off a paper placemat from a restaurant
    operated by some Amish-like religious sect near Washington, New
    Hampshire, about 1971-2... I used to stop there everytime I passed
    going and coming from a camping property I bought on Highland Lake.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highlan..._New_Hampshire)

    In fact I kept the place mat and still have it but it's very raggedy,
    they also handed out a small printed version at the cash register, on
    card stock, I still have that one too, it's also getting too aged to
    handle.

    THE MODERN DAY LITTLE RED HEN

    Once Upon A Time, there was a little red hen who scratched about
    the barnyard until she uncovered some grains of wheat. She called her
    neighbors and said, "If we plant this wheat we shall have bread to
    eat. Who will help me plant it?" "Not I," said the cow, the duck,
    the pig and the goose. "Then I will," said the little red hen; and
    she did.

    The wheat grew tall and ripened into golden grain. "Who will
    help me reap the wheat?" asked the little red hen. "Not I," said the
    duck, "Out of my classification," said the pig. "I'd lose my
    seniority," said the cow. "I'd lose my unemployment compensation,"
    said the goose. "Then I will," said the little red hen; and she did.

    At last it came time to bake the bread. "Who will help me bake
    the bread?" asked the little red hen. "That would be overtime for me"
    said the cow. "I'd lose my welfare benefits," said the duck.
    "Discrimination." screamed the goose. "Then I will." said the little
    red hen.

    She baked five loaves and held them up for her neighbors to see.
    They all wanted some and, in fact, demanded a share. But the little
    red hen said "No I can eat the five loaves myself." "Excess profits!"
    cried the cow. "I demand equal rights!" yelled the goose. The pig
    just grunted. And they painted "unfair" picket signs and marched
    around and around the little red hen.

    When the government agent came, he said to the little red hen,
    "You must not be greedy." "But I earned the bread," said the little
    red hen. "Exactly," said the agent. "That is the wonderful free
    enterprise system. Anyone in the barnyard can earn as much as he
    wants. But under our modern government regulations, the productive
    workers must divide their product with the idle. So be grateful that
    you're permitted to keep a small part of what you produced."

    And they all lived happily ever after, including the little red
    hen, who smiled and clucked, "I am grateful. I am grateful." But her
    neighbors wondered why she never again baked any more bread.

    THE END!

  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 21:49:27 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 12:09:36 -0400, blake murphy wrote:
    >
    >> i hope we'll hear about the results of your quest.

    >
    > Oh sure. Nobody wants to help turn my grain into something useful,
    > but they'll like to reap the rewards of my efforts!


    <snort>
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lit...n#Plot_summary
    >
    > Nobody makes mustard in a cooking group? I guess I'm just charting
    > new territory with everything I do.


    really, i'd like to help with some practical knowledge, but the last time i
    made mustard was probably thirty years ago. i still have the recipe cut
    out of the newspaper and glued to an eight-by-five card. it involved a
    blender, yellow (or black) mustard seeds, vinegar, water, salt and white
    wine.

    if you insist on tormenting me further, maybe i'll type it up. but it's
    unlikely.

    your pal,
    blake

  7. #7
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 13:37:36 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 21:49:27 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 12:09:36 -0400, blake murphy wrote:
    >>
    >>> i hope we'll hear about the results of your quest.

    >>
    >>Oh sure. Nobody wants to help turn my grain into something useful,
    >>but they'll like to reap the rewards of my efforts!
    >>
    >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lit...n#Plot_summary

    >
    > That's not accurate. The political version can't be attributable to
    > Ronald Reagan, least not during his Presidency... I posted that
    > version, a few times, I got it off a paper placemat from a restaurant
    > operated by some Amish-like religious sect near Washington, New
    > Hampshire, about 1971-2... I used to stop there everytime I passed
    > going and coming from a camping property I bought on Highland Lake.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highlan..._New_Hampshire)
    >
    > In fact I kept the place mat and still have it but it's very raggedy,
    > they also handed out a small printed version at the cash register, on
    > card stock, I still have that one too, it's also getting too aged to
    > handle.
    >
    > THE MODERN DAY LITTLE RED HEN
    >
    > Once Upon A Time, there was a little red hen who scratched about
    > the barnyard until she uncovered some grains of wheat. She called her
    > neighbors and said, "If we plant this wheat we shall have bread to
    > eat. Who will help me plant it?" "Not I," said the cow, the duck,
    > the pig and the goose. "Then I will," said the little red hen; and
    > she did.
    >
    > The wheat grew tall and ripened into golden grain. "Who will
    > help me reap the wheat?" asked the little red hen. "Not I," said the
    > duck, "Out of my classification," said the pig. "I'd lose my
    > seniority," said the cow. "I'd lose my unemployment compensation,"
    > said the goose. "Then I will," said the little red hen; and she did.
    >
    > At last it came time to bake the bread. "Who will help me bake
    > the bread?" asked the little red hen. "That would be overtime for me"
    > said the cow. "I'd lose my welfare benefits," said the duck.
    > "Discrimination." screamed the goose. "Then I will." said the little
    > red hen.
    >
    > She baked five loaves and held them up for her neighbors to see.
    > They all wanted some and, in fact, demanded a share. But the little
    > red hen said "No I can eat the five loaves myself." "Excess profits!"
    > cried the cow. "I demand equal rights!" yelled the goose. The pig
    > just grunted. And they painted "unfair" picket signs and marched
    > around and around the little red hen.
    >
    > When the government agent came, he said to the little red hen,
    > "You must not be greedy." "But I earned the bread," said the little
    > red hen. "Exactly," said the agent. "That is the wonderful free
    > enterprise system. Anyone in the barnyard can earn as much as he
    > wants. But under our modern government regulations, the productive
    > workers must divide their product with the idle. So be grateful that
    > you're permitted to keep a small part of what you produced."
    >
    > And they all lived happily ever after, including the little red
    > hen, who smiled and clucked, "I am grateful. I am grateful." But her
    > neighbors wondered why she never again baked any more bread.
    >
    > THE END!


    even if it's not reagan, it's still right-wing rubbish.

    blake

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 13:37:36 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > On Fri, 1 Oct 2010 21:49:27 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lit...n#Plot_summary

    >
    > That's not accurate.


    Then tell somebody who doesn't already know you and consider you an
    idiot.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 21:10:35 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > Any other mustard tips?


    OK, first notable weirdness was that after soaking all night in
    Baltika Porter #6 (beer), the mustard seeds soaked up the beer better
    than I expected, but they wouldn't pulverize that well.

    First I tried the blender and that only seemed to break up maybe 1/5th
    of the seeds even after 1 minute at med-high speed. Then I poured
    that into the food processor and whizzed that for a minute and a half.
    Hmm, still lots of whole seeds. OK, last try is the hand-held
    outboard boat motor (AKA stick blender). Even after another couple
    minutes with that at all different angles, only about 2/3rds of the
    seeds broke up. It's a very seedy mustard.

    It's not that the mustard seeds are tough or anything, my guess is
    that it's just the dynamics of the seed itself: round and slimy - they
    just slip around the blades. Is this why they boast "stone ground"?

    Any suggestions on what else to try other than pre-grinding dry seeds
    in the spice grinder (which works fine) or using a molcajete (sp?),
    which I don't own? I only own a small spice-sized mortar and pestle.

    -sw

  10. #10
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Sep 30, 9:10*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > Random Questions about Making Mustard
    >


    *snip USA Today-style brainfarts*

    Is this Larry King?

  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 23:39:19 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 21:10:35 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> Any other mustard tips?

    >
    >OK, first notable weirdness was that after soaking all night in
    >Baltika Porter #6 (beer), the mustard seeds soaked up the beer better
    >than I expected, but they wouldn't pulverize that well.
    >
    >First I tried the blender and that only seemed to break up maybe 1/5th
    >of the seeds even after 1 minute at med-high speed. Then I poured
    >that into the food processor and whizzed that for a minute and a half.
    >Hmm, still lots of whole seeds. OK, last try is the hand-held
    >outboard boat motor (AKA stick blender). Even after another couple
    >minutes with that at all different angles, only about 2/3rds of the
    >seeds broke up. It's a very seedy mustard.
    >
    >It's not that the mustard seeds are tough or anything, my guess is
    >that it's just the dynamics of the seed itself: round and slimy - they
    >just slip around the blades. Is this why they boast "stone ground"?
    >
    >Any suggestions on what else to try other than pre-grinding dry seeds
    >in the spice grinder (which works fine) or using a molcajete (sp?),
    >which I don't own? I only own a small spice-sized mortar and pestle.


    Penzeys.com

  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 10:41:52 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Penzeys.com


    Why would I pay Penzey's $2 more a pound ($2.70 vs $4.60) plus
    shipping for mustard seeds that will do the exact same thing?

    -sw

  13. #13
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 21:40:49 -0700 (PDT), projectile vomit chick wrote:

    > On Sep 30, 9:10*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> Random Questions about Making Mustard
    >>

    >
    > *snip USA Today-style brainfarts*
    >
    > Is this Larry King?


    golly, a question about making food on a food group.

    it ain't sqwertz whose brain is farting here. and your farts dribble.

    blake

  14. #14
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 11:36:55 -0400, blake murphy wrote:

    > On Tue, 5 Oct 2010 21:40:49 -0700 (PDT), projectile vomit chick wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 30, 9:10*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >>> Random Questions about Making Mustard
    >>>

    >>
    >> *snip USA Today-style brainfarts*
    >>
    >> Is this Larry King?

    >
    > golly, a question about making food on a food group.
    >
    > it ain't sqwertz whose brain is farting here.


    She's secretly in love with me. I was nice to her once and she was
    flabbergasted. She didn't know how to act so she pretended to fly off
    the handle about some other silly little thing. Now she's embarrassed
    and doesn't know how to act except in her usual ways.

    We all know she's Greg Morrow in drag, anyway.

    -sw

  15. #15
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings


    Sqwertz;1534984 Wrote:
    > On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 21:10:35 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    > -
    > Any other mustard tips? -
    >
    > OK, first notable weirdness was that after soaking all night in
    > Baltika Porter #6 (beer), the mustard seeds soaked up the beer better
    > than I expected, but they wouldn't pulverize that well.
    >
    > First I tried the blender and that only seemed to break up maybe 1/5th
    > of the seeds even after 1 minute at med-high speed. Then I poured
    > that into the food processor and whizzed that for a minute and a half.
    > Hmm, still lots of whole seeds. OK, last try is the hand-held
    > outboard boat motor (AKA stick blender). Even after another couple
    > minutes with that at all different angles, only about 2/3rds of the
    > seeds broke up. It's a very seedy mustard.
    >
    > It's not that the mustard seeds are tough or anything, my guess is
    > that it's just the dynamics of the seed itself: round and slimy - they
    > just slip around the blades. Is this why they boast "stone ground"?
    >
    > Any suggestions on what else to try other than pre-grinding dry seeds
    > in the spice grinder (which works fine) or using a molcajete (sp?),
    > which I don't own? I only own a small spice-sized mortar and pestle.
    >
    > -sw


    Interesting choice of brews to use. I do much prefer Baltika porter to
    their "10" lager, I'm pretty sure there's antifreeze in that stuff.

    Thanks for posting this. I love mustard, but have never made it before,
    aside from Chinese hot mustard. I ruined that, though, by allowing it to
    touch stainless steel.




    --
    Gorio

  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 09:58:44 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 10:41:52 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> Penzeys.com

    >
    >Why would I pay Penzey's $2 more a pound ($2.70 vs $4.60) plus
    >shipping for mustard seeds that will do the exact same thing?


    Then have the store where you buy seeds grind them for you.

    With all the trouble you're having grinding mustard seeds it's far
    from the exact same thing.

    I have no use for whole mustard seeds, I don't buy those. I buy their
    crushed and powdered mustard seed, saves me a lot of effort and I
    don't need to buy an expensive mill. And if you order the mustard
    when placing an order for other items shipping isn't all that much
    extra... shipping costs less than traveling to some store anyway.
    Mustard is the least expensive spice there is; I'm not going to
    deprive myself over a couple of dollars for an item that will likely
    last me a couple of years... a pound makes a lot of prepared
    mustard... but I bet you're one of those who thinks nothing of paying
    ridculously high prices for those imported mustards in those fancy
    schmancy tiny jars, which you can make ten times better for a tenth
    the cost yourself. Who gives a rat's b-hind if mustard costs $2 more
    a pound, it's not like you're consuming the entire pound in one day.

  17. #17
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz wrote:

    > I have no use for whole mustard seeds, I don't buy those.


    Those of us who actually *cook* do have uses for mustard seeds. They're good
    for pickling. They're good in curries. They're good for braising. They're
    essential for corned beef.

    I understand that anything more advanced than heating up canned SPAM is
    outside your comfort zone, but maybe you can bring yourself to try something
    like that.

    Bob



  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 19:19:24 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz wrote:
    >
    >> I have no use for whole mustard seeds, I don't buy those.

    >
    >Those of us who actually *cook* do have uses for mustard seeds. They're good
    >for pickling. They're good in curries. They're good for braising. They're
    >essential for corned beef.
    >
    >I understand that anything more advanced than heating up canned SPAM is
    >outside your comfort zone, but maybe you can bring yourself to try something
    >like that.
    >
    >Bob


    Like normal folks I buy pickling spice, Penseys' is excellent, they
    even have a special blend for corned beef. And no one eats whole
    mustard seed so I buy mine already crushed/powdered. And I don't eat
    curry... I get along quite well without eating stinkin' stewed baboon
    assface but I burn it every day... now go back to your keyboard
    kooking, you're dismissed.



  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 20:37:36 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 09:58:44 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 10:41:52 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >>> Penzeys.com

    >>
    >>Why would I pay Penzey's $2 more a pound ($2.70 vs $4.60) plus
    >>shipping for mustard seeds that will do the exact same thing?

    >
    > Then have the store where you buy seeds grind them for you.


    Grinding them is not the problem. It's getting tehm pulverized afetr
    I've soaked them in liquid (like beer or wine) as the precursor to
    making mustard.

    Yes, I could use ground mustard. And can grind it fine myself.
    like I already said two posts ago.

    -sw

  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Mustard Makings

    On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 19:40:32 +0000, Gorio wrote:

    > Interesting choice of brews to use. I do much prefer Baltika porter to
    > their "10" lager, I'm pretty sure there's antifreeze in that stuff.


    Agreed. The 10 is pretty gnarly. That's all this store carried at
    first. But at $.99/bottle and on a budget, I still bought 4 (before I
    tasted it).

    The porter was very interesting. But there was only 4 ounces left
    over for the chef; Must buy more. The porter is $2/bottle (16.9oz?).
    Sleek bottle shape, too.

    http://eng.baltika.ru/brand/0/3/13/6_porter.html

    "At the end of July 2009 Baltika №6 Porter was officially acknowledged
    the world’s Best Porter. It became one of the winners of the fourth
    international competition World Beer Awards. World Beer Awards is an
    international tasting competition that determines the best beer
    brands. It is organized by the UK magazine Beers of the World."

    Ironically, I saw the beer and that's when I got the idea to make
    mustard. Sierra Nevada makes a porter and stout mustard, but I've
    never tasted them.

    -sw

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