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Thread: Mussels

  1. #1
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Mussels

    On Saturday, I bought a 1 kg package of nice Dutch mussels, cleaned,
    de-bearded and vacuum-packed in sea water. Debearded mussels must be
    consumed as soon as possible, as they cannot live for very long. So, I
    cooked them the same day, even though the use-by date was next
    Wednesday. I used a combination of a Rhineland recipe, with onions,
    garlic and juniper berries, and, in addition, sauce Poulette with egg
    yolks and crème fraîche (a very nice but expensive d'Isigny brand). The
    cooking liquid resulted in a very tasty broth.

    Mussels

    2 large egg yolks
    12.5 cl (1/2 cup) crème fraîche
    1 kg (2.2 pounds) fresh mussels
    1 medium-sized onion, finely minced
    59 g (1.8 ounces) butter
    2 cloves fresh, still soft garlic, finely minced
    1 fresh bay leaf
    2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
    5 juniper berries
    250 ml (1 cup) dry white wine (Sauvignon blanc in this case)
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1 teaspoon salt

    Combine the egg yolks and crème fraîche in a small bowl, and whisk
    until well blended. Set aside.

    Rinse the mussels carefully (not really necessary in this case), then
    let them lie in water for a while, shedding any sand (they did not shed
    any sand in this case). Wash them again in running water, using a stiff
    brush (not really necessary in this case). Throw away any that remain
    open (I had to throw out two, because the shells were broken).

    Melt the butter in a non-reactive large skillet over medium heat. Add
    the onions and cook very slowly until soft, about 15 minutes. Add the
    thyme, juniper berries, bay leaf, salt and pepper. Pour in the wine and
    bring to boil over high heat. Add the mussels and cook, covered,
    stirring from time to time, 3 to 4 minutes. Discard any mussels that
    remain closed (none did).

    Remove from the heat and stir in the crème-fraîche-and-egg-yolk mixture,
    bathing the mussels in the sauce. Reheat the sauce gently, without
    boiling.

    Serve the mussels in the broth, with black rye bread or pumpernickel,
    and butter.

    Victor

  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Mussels

    In article <1iprekk.nyqpra1ibmzl4N%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > On Saturday, I bought a 1 kg package of nice Dutch mussels, cleaned,
    > de-bearded and vacuum-packed in sea water. Debearded mussels must be
    > consumed as soon as possible, as they cannot live for very long. So, I
    > cooked them the same day, even though the use-by date was next
    > Wednesday. I used a combination of a Rhineland recipe, with onions,
    > garlic and juniper berries, and, in addition, sauce Poulette with egg
    > yolks and crème fraîche (a very nice but expensive d'Isigny brand). The
    > cooking liquid resulted in a very tasty broth.
    >
    > Mussels
    >
    > 2 large egg yolks
    > 12.5 cl (1/2 cup) crème fraîche
    > 1 kg (2.2 pounds) fresh mussels
    > 1 medium-sized onion, finely minced
    > 59 g (1.8 ounces) butter
    > 2 cloves fresh, still soft garlic, finely minced
    > 1 fresh bay leaf
    > 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
    > 5 juniper berries
    > 250 ml (1 cup) dry white wine (Sauvignon blanc in this case)
    > 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    > 1 teaspoon salt


    Sounds tasty. The only mussels I can get around here are frozen.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  3. #3
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Mussels

    The message <1iprekk.nyqpra1ibmzl4N%[email protected]>
    from [email protected] (Victor Sack) contains these words:


    Thanks Victor that sounds wonderful. In summer we pick fresh wild
    mussels here.

    Janet (Isle of Arran Scotland)


    > On Saturday, I bought a 1 kg package of nice Dutch mussels, cleaned,
    > de-bearded and vacuum-packed in sea water. Debearded mussels must be
    > consumed as soon as possible, as they cannot live for very long. So, I
    > cooked them the same day, even though the use-by date was next
    > Wednesday. I used a combination of a Rhineland recipe, with onions,
    > garlic and juniper berries, and, in addition, sauce Poulette with egg
    > yolks and crème fraîche (a very nice but expensive d'Isigny brand). The
    > cooking liquid resulted in a very tasty broth.


    > Mussels


    > 2 large egg yolks
    > 12.5 cl (1/2 cup) crème fraîche
    > 1 kg (2.2 pounds) fresh mussels
    > 1 medium-sized onion, finely minced
    > 59 g (1.8 ounces) butter
    > 2 cloves fresh, still soft garlic, finely minced
    > 1 fresh bay leaf
    > 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
    > 5 juniper berries
    > 250 ml (1 cup) dry white wine (Sauvignon blanc in this case)
    > 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    > 1 teaspoon salt


    > Combine the egg yolks and crème fraîche in a small bowl, and whisk
    > until well blended. Set aside.


    > Rinse the mussels carefully (not really necessary in this case), then
    > let them lie in water for a while, shedding any sand (they did not shed
    > any sand in this case). Wash them again in running water, using a stiff
    > brush (not really necessary in this case). Throw away any that remain
    > open (I had to throw out two, because the shells were broken).


    > Melt the butter in a non-reactive large skillet over medium heat. Add
    > the onions and cook very slowly until soft, about 15 minutes. Add the
    > thyme, juniper berries, bay leaf, salt and pepper. Pour in the wine and
    > bring to boil over high heat. Add the mussels and cook, covered,
    > stirring from time to time, 3 to 4 minutes. Discard any mussels that
    > remain closed (none did).


    > Remove from the heat and stir in the crème-fraîche-and-egg-yolk mixture,
    > bathing the mussels in the sauce. Reheat the sauce gently, without
    > boiling.


    > Serve the mussels in the broth, with black rye bread or pumpernickel,
    > and butter.


    > Victor


  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Mussels

    Janet Baraclough wrote:
    >
    > Thanks Victor that sounds wonderful. In summer we pick fresh wild
    > mussels here.


    Around here, the beaches are posted with warnings
    that the mussels may be toxic. It's certainly
    true that mussels and clams may be rendered toxic
    by blooms of certain species of toxic algae,
    such as the ones that create "red tide". But I've
    never heard of a red tide or a bloom of toxic
    algae around here. I suspect the signs are more
    to protect the ecosystem than the public.

  5. #5
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Mussels

    Janet Baraclough <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In summer we pick fresh wild mussels here.


    Not in the "R" months?

    Victor

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