Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 67

Thread: Morning biskies

  1. #21
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 10/9/2012 10:31 AM, l, not -l wrote:
    > On 9-Oct-2012, dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 10/9/2012 8:06 AM, l, not -l wrote:
    >>> On 9-Oct-2012, dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Here's a question: Why do all Southern buttermilk biscuit recipes
    >>>>> --except WL-- also call for baking soda?
    >>>>
    >>>> It's some kind of traditional thing. You don't need baking soda. I make
    >>>> biscuits with milk and don't add soda. If I use buttermilk I'd feel
    >>>> obliged to add some baking soda for some unknown reason.
    >>>
    >>> Buttermilk is acidic; the soda neutralizes the acid and provides initial
    >>> leavening. Baking powder provides additional leavening as the biscuits
    >>> heat.

    >>
    >> So what would happen if you made buttermilk biscuits without adding
    >> soda? My guess is nothing. I don't have any buttermilk so I guess it
    >> will have to remain a guess. :-)

    >
    > As she approached 90, my dearly departed mother occasionally would forget an
    > ingredient or two in recipes she had made all her life. When she would
    > forget to add the soda to her buttermilk biscuit dough, they were noticeably
    > shorter/thinner, but just as tasty.
    >


    Thanks for the info. It's always embarrassing to forget stuff when
    you're an experienced cook. The last time I made a cake, I forgot to add
    the sugar - true story!

  2. #22
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Try it with the other modifications...


    What other mods? ...."adjust leavening"? Adjust how? More, less? I
    see the book, but don't have another $20 to spend. I have some wheat
    gluten, but it's over 3 yrs old and needs to be tossed. I also have a
    whole new sack of Gold Medal. Like pies, I gotta lotta time to
    experiment and plenty o' flour.

    nb


    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  3. #23
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 9 Oct 2012 20:48:17 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Try it with the other modifications...

    >
    >What other mods? ...."adjust leavening"? Adjust how? More, less? I
    >see the book, but don't have another $20 to spend. I have some wheat
    >gluten, but it's over 3 yrs old and needs to be tossed. I also have a
    >whole new sack of Gold Medal. Like pies, I gotta lotta time to
    >experiment and plenty o' flour.


    Get the book through interlibrary loan...you have done so before.and
    this one has been out long enough.

    Leavening needs to be reduced, as I mentioned before. Protein
    content needs to be up, hence the all purpose flour. You live in an
    area with very low humidity, so you will need more liquid than called
    for.
    I forget your particular altitude. If you can remind me, I can look
    up the porportions for the biscuits in her book, for leavening, etc.

    Christine


    >
    >nb

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #24
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 9 Oct 2012 20:48:17 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Try it with the other modifications...

    >
    >What other mods? ....


    Another modification that I forgot is that you need to bake at a
    higher temp at your altitude. If you let me know your altitude, I an
    give you the specifics.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  5. #25
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    notbob wrote:
    >
    > On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Try it with the other modifications...

    >
    > What other mods? ...."adjust leavening"? Adjust how? More, less? I
    > see the book, but don't have another $20 to spend. I have some wheat
    > gluten, but it's over 3 yrs old and needs to be tossed. I also have a
    > whole new sack of Gold Medal. Like pies, I gotta lotta time to
    > experiment and plenty o' flour.


    How about introducing some cream of tartar?
    It's commonly used as the acid component in
    baking powder, and it adds a sour/tart flavor.
    The cheapest cream of tartar I've found at retail
    is at Target. $4.99 for a 4 ounce jar. I kept
    buying all of them when they only had 2 or 3
    jars in stock. I guess their computers recognized
    this store was moving a lot of COT, because the
    last time I was there the stock had increased to
    about a dozen jars. (I use about a jar per week,
    maybe more than that.)

  6. #26
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    >There is a nice book out called Pie in The Sky, about baking at high
    >altitude. Maybe you can find it at the library, or order it. I
    >finally was able to master making biscuits at my altitude, by using
    >this.


    I see Alibris sellers have "Pie in the Sky: Successful Baking at High
    Altitudes" by Susan Gold Purdy, starting at $15.49 used.


    Steve

  7. #27
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 10:52:52 -0700 (PDT), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > The recipe I use calls for baking powder- no soda...


    FYI - baking powder has baking soda in it

    http://frugalliving.about.com/od/con...ing_Powder.htm

    Ingredients:

    1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons cream of tartar
    1 teaspoon corn starch (optional)

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  8. #28
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 12:44:14 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In my family Martha White Self Rising Flour was what we made biscuits
    > out of.
    > They were fabulous.


    Martha White must be even more Southern than White Lily.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  9. #29
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 14:58:27 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 9 Oct 2012 20:48:17 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Try it with the other modifications...

    > >
    > >What other mods? ....

    >
    > Another modification that I forgot is that you need to bake at a
    > higher temp at your altitude. If you let me know your altitude, I an
    > give you the specifics.
    >

    What's the message ID on your original message with biscuit hints? I
    don't seem to have it.


    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  10. #30
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On Tue, 09 Oct 2012 12:49:55 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 9 Oct 2012 15:42:08 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >It's my plan to start every morning with Southern buttermilk biscuits.
    > >This, essentially as an excuse to get up and turn on the oven and warm
    > >the freezing house. I also had Smucker's ship two 5lb bags of White
    > >Lily (WL) flour for precisely this purpose. So far, it's not been going
    > >well.

    >
    > A few things.
    >
    > White Lily Flour doesn't really work well for biscuits at high
    > altitudes. It has too low a protein level to support the structure
    > needed to keep biscuits and other things from falling. Unfortunately,
    > your biscuits will do better with a regular all purpose flour in this
    > instance.
    >
    > Another thing-the leavening will have to be adjusted for your
    > altitude. The regular amount of leavening can cause biscuits and
    > other thing to rise then fall spectacularly.
    >
    > And if the climate is dry, as it is where you are, you will need more
    > liquid.
    >
    > There is a nice book out called Pie in The Sky, about baking at high
    > altitude. Maybe you can find it at the library, or order it. I
    > finally was able to master making biscuits at my altitude, by using
    > this. Same with other things.
    >

    If this is the post I asked about, never mind. I thought it was part
    of the other subthread.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  11. #31
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I forget your particular altitude. If you can remind me, I can look
    > up the porportions for the biscuits in her book, for leavening, etc.


    Approx 8,000 ft elev. During winter when cool enough to bake, humidity is
    low, usually less than 35%. For example, humidity is currently 23%.

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  12. #32
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 10 Oct 2012 01:04:00 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2012-10-09, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I forget your particular altitude. If you can remind me, I can look
    >> up the porportions for the biscuits in her book, for leavening, etc.

    >
    >Approx 8,000 ft elev. During winter when cool enough to bake, humidity is
    >low, usually less than 35%. For example, humidity is currently 23%.
    >
    >nb


    Okay, the closest to that is the listing for 7000 feet, then 10.000
    feet. I will give you the 7000 feet listing.

    2 cups all purpose flour.
    1 tablespoon baking powder
    3/4 tsp salt
    6 tablespoons butter or shortening
    1 cup buttermilk: I use the whole amount

    Use whatever directions you were using.. Bake in a 450 oven for 15-17
    minutes, using the middle rack of the oven.

    If you use WL flour, let me know how it turns out. I will be very
    interested. I found out for my elevation at 6500 feet this worked
    out well.

    For 10,000 feet, the baking powder was changed to 1 tablespoon plus 1
    tsp. The buttermilk was changed to 3/4 cup whole milk, plus 2-3 tsp.
    No baking soda in the 7000 and 10000 feet versions.

    For 5000 feet and lower, baking soda was added and the baking powder
    was different. I tried the 5000 feet version and it didn't work for
    me...but the 7000 feet version did.

    I hope this helps.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  13. #33
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On Oct 9, 5:35*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >
    > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 12:44:14 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    >
    > <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > In my family Martha White Self Rising Flour was what we made biscuits
    > > out of.
    > > They were fabulous.

    >
    > Martha White must be even more Southern than White Lily.
    >
    >

    I never saw White Lily in this area until about 25 years ago, both are
    excellent flours and now that I've read they're both owned by Smuckers
    there probably is no difference as was stated.

  14. #34
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 2012-10-10, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 2 cups all purpose flour.
    > 1 tablespoon baking powder
    > 3/4 tsp salt
    > 6 tablespoons butter or shortening
    > 1 cup buttermilk: I use the whole amount


    hmmmm.... That's 50% more shortening (75g up from 50g) and 33% more
    milk (1 C up from 3/4 cup). Definitely a wetter/moisture dough.
    Sounds good.


    BTW, I'm getting my measurments from this ultimate converter webite:

    http://www.onlineconversion.com/weig...me_cooking.htm

    It converts measurement, like most good converters, but has the added
    benefit of figuring in the known "density" of the "substance" being
    converted. Too cool! Worth bookmarking, this one.

    > Use whatever directions you were using.. Bake in a 450 oven for 15-17
    > minutes.....


    noted...

    > If you use WL flour, let me know how it turns out. I will be very
    > interested.


    I will.

    > I hope this helps.


    Me also. Thank you.

    Also, I jes bought some Meadow Gold extra rich buttermilk, whatever
    that worth. We'll see, tomorrow. I should be up before the rooster
    crows, unless Mom does one of her wee hours rambles and I lose 2 hrs
    sleep in the middle of the night, like last night. 8|

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  15. #35
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 10 Oct 2012 02:51:59 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    ..
    >hmmmm.... That's 50% more shortening (75g up from 50g) and 33% more
    >milk (1 C up from 3/4 cup). Definitely a wetter/moisture dough.
    >Sounds good.


    It doesn't turn out to be a very wet dough. But remember, you are a
    low humidity.
    Also, handle the dough as little as possible...but you probably know
    that already.
    ..
    >> I hope this helps.

    >
    >Me also. Thank you.


    It may turn out that you need to do more tweaking. But maybe this
    will be a better place to start....
    >
    >Also, I jes bought some Meadow Gold extra rich buttermilk, whatever
    >that worth. We'll see, tomorrow. I should be up before the rooster
    >crows, unless Mom does one of her wee hours rambles and I lose 2 hrs
    >sleep in the middle of the night, like last night. 8|


    Now, I am getting hungry for biscuits, and that is really saying
    something these days. I have almost no appetite these days... I have
    to go with it when I start craving something...cause that is about the
    only time I have any appetite.

    I sure hope the WL flour experiment works...cause then I could
    probably use mine.

    Christine
    >
    >nb

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  16. #36
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 2012-10-10, Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It doesn't turn out to be a very wet dough.


    It is, in fact, a very wet sticky dough. No problem, though. I comes
    together very quickly and requires almost no handling. Jes dump on
    floured counter and sprinkle some flour on top, pat out to about 1"
    and cut. I've got a 5 in the oven, now, @ 450F.

    > It may turn out that you need to do more tweaking. But maybe this
    > will be a better place to start....


    It certainly won't be dry!

    Well, we will know in about 15 mins.

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  17. #37
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On Oct 10, 6:49*am, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:


    There is a recipe in the OLD Better Homes And Gardens New
    Cookbook...circa 60's or 70' called Biscuits Supreme.
    It has cream of tarter in it and those are fabulous biscuits. Here
    is the on line version which has been tweaked
    from the one in the book.

    http://www.bhg.com/recipe/quickbreads/biscuits-supreme/

    I'm looking at the book now and it's different in the measurements but
    same ingredients.
    I always loved this biscuit recipe.

    Since you are playing, try this one.


  18. #38
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 2012-10-10, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Well, we will know in about 15 mins.


    It's a no go.

    Yes, the biscuits are somewhat moister, but I see almost no rising at
    all. I may hafta buy some wheat gluten at Walmart to save this soft
    flour. I'm gonna try Gold Medal AP, tomorrow (Hell, Bisquick is
    better!). I used GM AP last winter and my efforts were definitely
    better than this.

    I've run across this recipes with spectacular claims:
    http://tinyurl.com/8szwz94

    I might try it. We'll see. I'll probably eat my biskies with my
    Creole red beans, which came out fabulous. I still can't bring myself
    to eat the rice part.

    nb



    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  19. #39
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies

    On 10/9/12 6:08 PM, Steve Pope wrote:

    > I see Alibris sellers have "Pie in the Sky: Successful Baking at High
    > Altitudes" by Susan Gold Purdy, starting at $15.49 used.


    ABE does too. And it's only $18 new in hardcover from Amazon.

    -- Larry


  20. #40
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Morning biskies


    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 2012-10-10, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Well, we will know in about 15 mins.

    >
    > It's a no go.
    >
    > Yes, the biscuits are somewhat moister, but I see almost no rising at
    > all. I may hafta buy some wheat gluten at Walmart to save this soft
    > flour. I'm gonna try Gold Medal AP, tomorrow (Hell, Bisquick is
    > better!). I used GM AP last winter and my efforts were definitely
    > better than this.
    >
    > I've run across this recipes with spectacular claims:
    > http://tinyurl.com/8szwz94
    >
    > I might try it. We'll see. I'll probably eat my biskies with my
    > Creole red beans, which came out fabulous. I still can't bring myself
    > to eat the rice part.
    >
    > nb
    >

    Aha. I've been watching this adventure and finally see something to add.
    If you are patting out your dough to 1" - that seems waaay to thick to me.
    If you are cutting your biscuits , 'some say' that will cause the biscuits
    to have sort of hard edges and keep them from rising properly. Spoon a
    biscuit size of wet dough into flour, sprinkle on a little flour. Pick up
    the biscuit and shape it gently. Polly


    >
    >
    > --
    > Definition of objectivism:
    > "Eff you! I got mine."
    > http://www.nongmoproject.org/



Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32