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Thread: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

  1. #1
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

    Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    starting to show, big time.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/bu...14crop.html?hp

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

    ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    > Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    > engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    > starting to show, big time.


    There nothing wrong _per_se_ with genetically
    engineered crops. What's wrong with adding a gene
    from a bacterium or another plant to a food species?

    For example, there's a GMO rice which has been
    given the genes needed to produce pro-vitamin A
    precursors. But the environmentalist crazies
    oppose its use under any and all circumstances,
    even though it would save lives.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice

  3. #3
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown inthe United States is genetically engineered.

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > ImStillMags wrote:
    >> Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    >> engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    >> starting to show, big time.

    >
    > There nothing wrong _per_se_ with genetically
    > engineered crops. What's wrong with adding a gene
    > from a bacterium or another plant to a food species?
    >
    > For example, there's a GMO rice which has been
    > given the genes needed to produce pro-vitamin A
    > precursors. But the environmentalist crazies
    > oppose its use under any and all circumstances,
    > even though it would save lives.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice


    Even if such manipulation is ultimately benign, it seems very hubristic
    of agribusiness to foist it on the public, we wont know for a hundred
    years or more if any unforeseen results occur from such genetic
    manipulation, and that hopefully will take that long, there is always at
    least a chance that the Frankenfoods can become, even accidentally, a
    plague, and that quickly.

    The agribusiness is trying to centralize and control food production &
    distribution and that they have not learned from history what a bad idea
    that is i can not accept, history speaks too loudly about the dangers of
    food production and distribution being centralized, i can only assume
    agribusiness is doing it out of pure greed, they want to patent their
    seeds and make a farmer buy new ones every year rather than keeping
    aside part of his previous crop for its seed. Pure greed.

    I often think that if our advancing technology fatally effects us it
    will probly be by accident rather than intent. "Oops"."

    And its foolish to think the military isn't experimenting with genetic
    manipulation for use as a weapon, in the chemical and biological armory.
    And any of those could get loose "accidentally,"
    --
    JL

  4. #4
    pure kona Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 16:13:38 -0700, Joseph Littleshoes
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    >Even if such manipulation is ultimately benign, it seems very hubristic
    >of agribusiness to foist it on the public, we wont know for a hundred
    >years or more if any unforeseen results occur from such genetic
    >manipulation, and that hopefully will take that long, there is always at
    >least a chance that the Frankenfoods can become, even accidentally, a
    >plague, and that quickly.
    >
    >The agribusiness is trying to centralize and control food production &
    >distribution and that they have not learned from history what a bad idea
    >that is i can not accept, history speaks too loudly about the dangers of
    >food production and distribution being centralized, i can only assume
    >agribusiness is doing it out of pure greed, they want to patent their
    >seeds and make a farmer buy new ones every year rather than keeping
    >aside part of his previous crop for its seed. Pure greed.
    >
    >I often think that if our advancing technology fatally effects us it
    >will probly be by accident rather than intent. "Oops"."
    >
    >And its foolish to think the military isn't experimenting with genetic
    >manipulation for use as a weapon, in the chemical and biological armory.
    > And any of those could get loose "accidentally,"


    I know we have discussed this before, but I am passionate about GMO.
    Agribusiness is not really farming - I know. It's mechanical farming
    run by a corporate company using scientists and tons of machinery in
    tandem with engineered seed -in this article- RoundUp Ready seed.

    Don't think one farmer and his 5 acres, working hard to make each
    plant happy.

    One has to buy the seed from Monsanto. (I've mentioned the farmer who
    got pollen drift from a neighbor's Monsanto crop and was sued by
    Monsanto! The seed was growing illegally?) Thousands of acres making
    HFCS so that sugar from cane has been driven out of the US market for
    most companies--so how has your Campbell's tomato soup tasted this
    last decade- bit too sweet?

    Universities and their scientists have a lot to gain from Monsanto and
    other research dollars. It's hard to turn away the money. But in our
    little island County, we fought hard to keep GMO coffee out and not
    taint our heritage Kona Coffee . It was a mighty battle but we were
    convinced what we had is perfect and did not need to be
    "improved"----and proudly became the first US County to say NO to
    GMO.

    aloha,
    Cea



  5. #5
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown inthe United States is genetically engineered.

    pure kona wrote:
    > On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 16:13:38 -0700, Joseph Littleshoes
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I often think that if our advancing technology fatally effects us it
    >> will probly be by accident rather than intent. "Oops"."
    >>
    >> And its foolish to think the military isn't experimenting with genetic
    >> manipulation for use as a weapon, in the chemical and biological armory.
    >> And any of those could get loose "accidentally,"

    >
    > I know we have discussed this before,


    Yes, hello Pure Kona, we had an enjoyable misunderstanding not once and
    that but a few months ago
    --
    JL

  6. #6
    Je▀us Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown intheUnited States is genetically engineered.

    On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 12:18:59 -0700, ImStillMags reckoned:

    > Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    > engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    > starting to show, big time.
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/bu...14crop.html?hp


    Agree completely. Then there's the not-so-small matter of companies like Monsanto and the
    underhanded techniques they use to shut down farmers who don't buy their GMO seed.

    What kind of sick mind comes up with 'Terminator' technology?

    --
    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism
    by those who haven't got it - George Bernard Shaw

  7. #7
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> posted on Tue,
    13 Apr 2010 13:09:06 -0700 the following:

    > ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    > > Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    > > engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    > > starting to show, big time.

    >
    > There nothing wrong _per_se_ with genetically engineered crops. What's
    > wrong with adding a gene from a bacterium or another plant to a food
    > species?


    It artificially breaks the synergy of how the food has naturally evolved
    in its own environment. It would be like some alien species coming to
    Earth and planting seeds from their planet on ours. People evolved with
    their foods, and over time have come to have a synergic relationship with
    their foods. Genetic modification disrupts that synergy and health
    problems can be the result as our bodies try to figure out what to do with
    it. Sometimes the result can be allergic reactions.

    I remember reading about cotton grown in India, I believe it was. For
    years, they only grew natural cotton. Then some company came in and
    wanted to sell their genetically modified cotton seeds to the plantation,
    saying their crop yields would increase. The harvesters of the
    genetically modified cotton began breaking out in rashes. Imagine what
    the result would be of people wearing clothes made from genetically
    modified cotton. Now they're finding that the genetically modified cotton
    plants are seriously destroying the health of the soil.

    http://www.i-sis.org.uk/farmersSuici...ottonIndia.php

    Naturally, it's about money. These GMO companies want to patent their
    seeds and fix up the system where you must buy more seeds instead of using
    the seeds from the previous year's harvest. I've even heard stories of
    GMO companies trying to sue people whose farms were infested by
    cross-pollenation from genetically-modified crops.

    > For example, there's a GMO rice which has been given the genes needed to
    > produce pro-vitamin A precursors. But the environmentalist crazies
    > oppose its use under any and all circumstances, even though it would
    > save lives.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice


    "Would save lives" is a theory. They won't know until they actually
    spread it around. It may save lives, or it may cause more people to live
    longer with nasty health effects.

    Damaeus
    --
    "Marihuana influences Negroes to look at white people in the eye, step on
    white men's shadows and look at a white woman twice."
    -William Randolph Hearst

  8. #8
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> posted on
    Tue, 13 Apr 2010 16:13:38 -0700 the following:

    > And its foolish to think the military isn't experimenting with genetic
    > manipulation for use as a weapon, in the chemical and biological armory.
    > And any of those could get loose "accidentally,"


    War and pestilence. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy.

    Damaeus
    --
    "Marihuana influences Negroes to look at white people in the eye, step on
    white men's shadows and look at a white woman twice."
    -William Randolph Hearst

  9. #9
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Je+AN8-us <[email protected]> posted on 14 Apr 2010
    08:30:42 +-0200 the following:

    > On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 12:18:59 -0700, ImStillMags reckoned:
    >
    > > Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    > > engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    > > starting to show, big time.
    > >
    > > http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/bu...14crop.html?hp

    >
    > Agree completely. Then there's the not-so-small matter of companies
    > like Monsanto and the underhanded techniques they use to shut down
    > farmers who don't buy their GMO seed.
    >
    > What kind of sick mind comes up with 'Terminator' technology?


    People who want (a) money, and (b) the means to control the food supply.
    Withhold food, then tell people what to do, and if they don't do it,
    starve them until they die.

    Once these seed companies have sucked up all the natural seed companies,
    and have monopolized the seed market, controlling the price of food and
    the access to it becomes easy. Just like they only make so many vaccines,
    or only make so much oil available, or only make so much gas available,
    all so they can control the price of it, that's what'll continue happening
    with food. They already do that by paying farmers not to grow certain
    crops, just so the price of that food item will not drop. And then just
    let people in other parts of the world starve and die. It's just natural,
    right? Atheists who are worried about overpopulation love to tout the
    idea that letting people starve and die is just the natural way to do
    things, and many of them think we have too many people in the world as it
    is.

    Damaeus
    --
    "Marihuana influences Negroes to look at white people in the eye, step on
    white men's shadows and look at a white woman twice."
    -William Randolph Hearst

  10. #10
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.



    "pure kona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 13 Apr 2010 16:13:38 -0700, Joseph Littleshoes
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>Even if such manipulation is ultimately benign, it seems very hubristic
    >>of agribusiness to foist it on the public, we wont know for a hundred
    >>years or more if any unforeseen results occur from such genetic
    >>manipulation, and that hopefully will take that long, there is always at
    >>least a chance that the Frankenfoods can become, even accidentally, a
    >>plague, and that quickly.
    >>
    >>The agribusiness is trying to centralize and control food production &
    >>distribution and that they have not learned from history what a bad idea
    >>that is i can not accept, history speaks too loudly about the dangers of
    >>food production and distribution being centralized, i can only assume
    >>agribusiness is doing it out of pure greed, they want to patent their
    >>seeds and make a farmer buy new ones every year rather than keeping
    >>aside part of his previous crop for its seed. Pure greed.
    >>
    >>I often think that if our advancing technology fatally effects us it
    >>will probly be by accident rather than intent. "Oops"."
    >>
    >>And its foolish to think the military isn't experimenting with genetic
    >>manipulation for use as a weapon, in the chemical and biological armory.
    >> And any of those could get loose "accidentally,"

    >
    > I know we have discussed this before, but I am passionate about GMO.
    > Agribusiness is not really farming - I know. It's mechanical farming
    > run by a corporate company using scientists and tons of machinery in
    > tandem with engineered seed -in this article- RoundUp Ready seed.
    >
    > Don't think one farmer and his 5 acres, working hard to make each
    > plant happy.
    >
    > One has to buy the seed from Monsanto. (I've mentioned the farmer who
    > got pollen drift from a neighbor's Monsanto crop and was sued by
    > Monsanto! The seed was growing illegally?) Thousands of acres making
    > HFCS so that sugar from cane has been driven out of the US market for
    > most companies--so how has your Campbell's tomato soup tasted this
    > last decade- bit too sweet?
    >
    > Universities and their scientists have a lot to gain from Monsanto and
    > other research dollars. It's hard to turn away the money. But in our
    > little island County, we fought hard to keep GMO coffee out and not
    > taint our heritage Kona Coffee . It was a mighty battle but we were
    > convinced what we had is perfect and did not need to be
    > "improved"----and proudly became the first US County to say NO to
    > GMO.
    >
    > aloha,
    > Cea


    The funny thing is, farmers that bought into the idea of increasing their
    yield beyond their wildest dreams with GMO crops are in far worse financial
    shape growing 220 bushels per acre than when they were growing 60 bushels
    per acre. The (government subsidized) overproduction has driven prices down
    so far that they can't keep up with the mortgage payments on the bigger
    equipment needed to sew and harvest those crops. Not being able to use the
    seed from each crop and having to buy new seed every planting further drains
    their resources. The family farm is pretty much dead in the US.

    <rant off>
    Jon




  11. #11
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown inthe United States is genetically engineered.

    On 4/13/2010 7:13 PM, Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    >> ImStillMags wrote:
    >>> Good article in todays NY Times. I don't like these genetically
    >>> engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    >>> starting to show, big time.

    >>
    >> There nothing wrong _per_se_ with genetically
    >> engineered crops. What's wrong with adding a gene
    >> from a bacterium or another plant to a food species?
    >>
    >> For example, there's a GMO rice which has been
    >> given the genes needed to produce pro-vitamin A
    >> precursors. But the environmentalist crazies
    >> oppose its use under any and all circumstances,
    >> even though it would save lives.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice

    >
    > Even if such manipulation is ultimately benign, it seems very hubristic
    > of agribusiness to foist it on the public, we wont know for a hundred
    > years or more if any unforeseen results occur from such genetic
    > manipulation, and that hopefully will take that long, there is always at
    > least a chance that the Frankenfoods can become, even accidentally, a
    > plague, and that quickly.


    The same is true of selective breeding. What of it? Life is never
    going to be risk free. On a scale of 1 to 10, corn spreading naturally
    is about a -3.

    > The agribusiness is trying to centralize and control food production &
    > distribution and that they have not learned from history what a bad idea
    > that is i can not accept, history speaks too loudly about the dangers of
    > food production and distribution being centralized, i can only assume
    > agribusiness is doing it out of pure greed, they want to patent their
    > seeds and make a farmer buy new ones every year rather than keeping
    > aside part of his previous crop for its seed. Pure greed.


    They don't need genetic modification or patents to do that. Grow some
    hybrid corn, harvest the kernels for seed, then plant the kernels next
    year and see what comes up.

    However for such food to "become a plague", that plan would have to fail
    spectacularly.

    > I often think that if our advancing technology fatally effects us it
    > will probly be by accident rather than intent. "Oops"."
    >
    > And its foolish to think the military isn't experimenting with genetic
    > manipulation for use as a weapon, in the chemical and biological armory.
    > And any of those could get loose "accidentally,"


    What does the creation of weapons have to do with the production of
    food? "This technology can be used to make weapons so we shouldn't use
    it to produce food" applies to tractors you know.

    If you are this afraid of genetic engineering you haven't had a very
    eventful life.



  12. #12
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

    On Apr 13, 3:18*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Good article in todays NY Times. * I don't like these genetically
    > engineered crops at all and apparently the detrimental effects are
    > starting to show, big time.
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/bu...ronment/14crop....


    GMO foods--excellent! Bring it on.

    Cindy Hamilton

  13. #13
    procooking is offline Assistant Cook
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default

    "More than 80 percent of the corn..."

    Or to be more accurate 100% ? This is sick.

  14. #14
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    On 2010-04-14 04:41:33 -0700, J. Clarke said:

    > If you are this afraid of genetic engineering you haven't had a very
    > eventful life.


    Or you don't have unqualified faith in everything done by a bunch of
    guys in lab jackets, and everything said by "experts".

    I remember as a child when DDT was considered wholly benign to flora
    and fauna to these same lab jackets. That same summer ('62?) everywhere
    I went I saw dead birds. I saw a dead bird almost every day.
    --
    Thank you and have a nice day.


  15. #15
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

    Damaeus wrote:
    >
    > It artificially breaks the synergy of how the food has naturally evolved
    > in its own environment. It would be like some alien species coming to
    > Earth and planting seeds from their planet on ours. People evolved with
    > their foods, and over time have come to have a synergic relationship with
    > their foods. Genetic modification disrupts that synergy and health
    > problems can be the result as our bodies try to figure out what to do with
    > it. Sometimes the result can be allergic reactions.


    Yes, it breaks our woo-woo and it's bad feng shui.

    If I put a celery gene in a carrot, how is that going
    to be any more "toxic" than eating celery with carrots?

  16. #16
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown intheUnited States is genetically engineered.

    Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
    >
    > Even if such manipulation is ultimately benign, it seems very hubristic
    > of agribusiness to foist it on the public, we wont know for a hundred
    > years or more if any unforeseen results occur from such genetic
    > manipulation, and that hopefully will take that long, there is always at
    > least a chance that the Frankenfoods can become, even accidentally, a
    > plague, and that quickly.


    How do we know electromagnetic fields won't have
    adverse effects we won't know about for a hundred
    years or more? Stop the lightbulb and its artificial
    light! Only use natural light from the Sun and fire!

  17. #17
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

    pure kona wrote:
    >
    > One has to buy the seed from Monsanto. (I've mentioned the farmer who
    > got pollen drift from a neighbor's Monsanto crop and was sued by
    > Monsanto! The seed was growing illegally?) Thousands of acres making
    > HFCS so that sugar from cane has been driven out of the US market for
    > most companies--so how has your Campbell's tomato soup tasted this
    > last decade- bit too sweet?


    GMO isn't responsible for HFCS. It's sugar price
    regulation which created a market for HFCS, which
    is outside of regulation. Without sugar price
    regulation which raises the price of sucrose
    in the U.S. to about 2X to 4X the world price,
    there would no market for HFCS at all. HFCS
    makes it possible for cola and soda makers to
    remain competitive, but that doesn't help the
    other users of sugar. You can't make most types
    of candy out of HFCS, so we've lost most of our
    candy industry to Canada and Mexico.

  18. #18
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    Damaeus wrote:

    > It artificially breaks the synergy of how the food has naturally
    > evolved in its own environment. It would be like some alien species
    > coming to Earth and planting seeds from their planet on ours. People
    > evolved with their foods, and over time have come to have a synergic
    > relationship with their foods. Genetic modification disrupts that
    > synergy and health problems can be the result as our bodies try to
    > figure out what to do with it. Sometimes the result can be allergic
    > reactions.


    In fact, when did allergy and intolerance to gluten start to spread? When we
    started messing up with wheat circa 50 years ago, using crossbreading and
    exposure to radioactivity to accelerate the many generations and allow the
    selection of high yield wheat verieties (like the italian Creso) in a bunch
    of years instead of many decades.
    Gluten intolerance was never heard of in my area until the 60's, and was
    very limited till then. Nowadays it's almost normal.
    I know that radioactive bombed seeds and GMO seeds are two different things,
    but they both bring to a different genetic patterns.
    --
    ViLco
    Don't think pink, drink rose'



  19. #19
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in theUnited States is genetically engineered.

    On Apr 14, 12:11*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > pure kona wrote:
    >
    > > One has to buy the seed from Monsanto. (I've mentioned the farmer who
    > > got pollen drift from a neighbor's Monsanto crop and was sued by
    > > Monsanto! The seed was growing illegally?) *Thousands of acres making
    > > HFCS so that sugar from cane has been driven out of the US market for
    > > most companies--so how has your Campbell's tomato soup tasted this
    > > last decade- bit too sweet?

    >
    > GMO isn't responsible for HFCS. *It's sugar price
    > regulation which created a market for HFCS, which
    > is outside of regulation. *Without sugar price
    > regulation which raises the price of sucrose
    > in the U.S. to about 2X to 4X the world price,
    > there would no market for HFCS at all. *HFCS
    > makes it possible for cola and soda makers to
    > remain competitive, but that doesn't help the
    > other users of sugar. *You can't make most types
    > of candy out of HFCS, so we've lost most of our
    > candy industry to Canada and Mexico.


    Aren't the corn subsidies a big part of the picture, too?

    Cindy Hamilton

  20. #20
    Damaeus Guest

    Default Re: More than 80 percent of the corn, soybean and cotton grown in the United States is genetically engineered.

    In news:rec.food.cooking, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> posted on Wed,
    14 Apr 2010 09:04:13 -0700 the following:

    > Damaeus wrote:
    >
    > > It artificially breaks the synergy of how the food has naturally
    > > evolved in its own environment. It would be like some alien species
    > > coming to Earth and planting seeds from their planet on ours. People
    > > evolved with their foods, and over time have come to have a synergic
    > > relationship with their foods. Genetic modification disrupts that
    > > synergy and health problems can be the result as our bodies try to
    > > figure out what to do with it. Sometimes the result can be allergic
    > > reactions.

    >
    > Yes, it breaks our woo-woo and it's bad feng shui.


    o.o If you want to think of it that way, go ahead. I don't go in for
    woo-woo and feng shui. I'm more of a realist.

    > If I put a celery gene in a carrot, how is that going
    > to be any more "toxic" than eating celery with carrots?


    Ask someone who does that line of work. Of course, he probably will tell
    you there's nothing wrong with it since the carrot would still look like a
    carrot. But I already explained what happened just with cotton pickers in
    India. They broke out in rashes from picking genetically-modified cotton.
    I don't know if they stuck a celery gene in the cotton, or a gene from a
    12" penis. The fact remains that genetically-modified cotton gave the
    cotton pickers rashes.

    Damaeus
    --
    "Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
    crimes"
    -Daily Mirror (1924)

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