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Thread: Moon Cake

  1. #1
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On 2011-09-06, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Either way, I don't much like them.


    That makes your choices pretty easy, then, doesn't it.

    nb

  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On 9/6/2011 7:21 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > It's moon cake season, as I can tell from the
    > free samples passed out at the Asian food store
    > on weekends. (Marina in Cupertino is best for
    > samples, Maxim seldom has samples of anything,
    > and Tin Tin closed several months ago.)
    >
    > After trying them once or twice, I turned them
    > down because I thought they were made from bean
    > paste and I don't eat beans. However, Wikipedia
    > informs me that traditionally they are made from
    > lotus seed paste, but cheaper ones may have white
    > kidney beans added as a filler.
    >
    > Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    > like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    > anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    > luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    > nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    > The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    > I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.


    I am not big on pastries but what you described is the type I like. They
    don't add tons of sugar. With typical pastries I get the impression I
    could get the same result by getting a spoon and the sugar bowl.

    I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite. Each to
    his own I guess.

    >
    > I try to catch the latest news in the People's
    > Daily (semi-official newspaper of the Communist
    > Party of China), and they recently had an article
    > about the new tax on moon cakes.
    >
    > http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90780/7589199.html
    >
    > Wow! Moon cakes are really expensive in China.
    > It's a ridiculous tax, for reasons mentioned in
    > the article. I suppose a "Moon Cake Party" could
    > get traction, until the authorities became aware
    > of it.
    >
    > Next time I'm offered a sample, I'll take it.
    > I should re-evaluate whether they are really as
    > uninteresting as I recall.
    >
    > I was thinking how a moon cake might be improved
    > in the direction I would like, and it occurred to
    > me that a lotus seed ganache might be interesting.
    > Googling "lotus seed ganache" gets exactly one hit
    > (probably more after I post this), so I'm not the
    > first person to think of this. I don't think I'll
    > bother trying to make it, though. Lotus seeds
    > don't have much flavor, nor an interesting texture.
    > Maybe I'll change my mind after having another
    > sample.



  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Moon Cake

    It's moon cake season, as I can tell from the
    free samples passed out at the Asian food store
    on weekends. (Marina in Cupertino is best for
    samples, Maxim seldom has samples of anything,
    and Tin Tin closed several months ago.)

    After trying them once or twice, I turned them
    down because I thought they were made from bean
    paste and I don't eat beans. However, Wikipedia
    informs me that traditionally they are made from
    lotus seed paste, but cheaper ones may have white
    kidney beans added as a filler.

    Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.

    I try to catch the latest news in the People's
    Daily (semi-official newspaper of the Communist
    Party of China), and they recently had an article
    about the new tax on moon cakes.

    http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90780/7589199.html

    Wow! Moon cakes are really expensive in China.
    It's a ridiculous tax, for reasons mentioned in
    the article. I suppose a "Moon Cake Party" could
    get traction, until the authorities became aware
    of it.

    Next time I'm offered a sample, I'll take it.
    I should re-evaluate whether they are really as
    uninteresting as I recall.

    I was thinking how a moon cake might be improved
    in the direction I would like, and it occurred to
    me that a lotus seed ganache might be interesting.
    Googling "lotus seed ganache" gets exactly one hit
    (probably more after I post this), so I'm not the
    first person to think of this. I don't think I'll
    bother trying to make it, though. Lotus seeds
    don't have much flavor, nor an interesting texture.
    Maybe I'll change my mind after having another
    sample.

  4. #4
    Tara Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On Tue, 06 Sep 2011 18:47:59 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite.


    I love red bean filling. I love sesame seed balls filled with red
    bean and those peach shaped red bean dumplings.

    Tara

  5. #5
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    George wrote:
    >
    > On 9/6/2011 7:21 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > >
    > > Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    > > like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    > > anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    > > luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    > > nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    > > The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    > > I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.

    >
    > I am not big on pastries but what you described is the type I like. They
    > don't add tons of sugar. With typical pastries I get the impression I
    > could get the same result by getting a spoon and the sugar bowl.
    >
    > I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite. Each to
    > his own I guess.


    Then I guess you'd really like manju. I don't,
    and for the same reasons I'm not fond of moon cake.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manj%C5%AB

    Manju looks good, right up to the point where
    you bite into it. Then you discover it's full of
    bean paste.

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    Tara wrote:
    >
    > On Tue, 06 Sep 2011 18:47:59 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite.

    >
    > I love red bean filling. I love sesame seed balls filled with red
    > bean and those peach shaped red bean dumplings.


    Seioubo. Please don't look, Sheldon.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Se...nal_sweets.jpg

  7. #7
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    i am hoping carol will come along with a japanese version/recipe, Lee
    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Tara wrote:
    >>
    >> On Tue, 06 Sep 2011 18:47:59 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite.

    >>
    >> I love red bean filling. I love sesame seed balls filled with red
    >> bean and those peach shaped red bean dumplings.

    >
    > Seioubo. Please don't look, Sheldon.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Se...nal_sweets.jpg




  8. #8
    George Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On 9/6/2011 8:05 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > George wrote:
    >>
    >> On 9/6/2011 7:21 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    >>> like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    >>> anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    >>> luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    >>> nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    >>> The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    >>> I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.

    >>
    >> I am not big on pastries but what you described is the type I like. They
    >> don't add tons of sugar. With typical pastries I get the impression I
    >> could get the same result by getting a spoon and the sugar bowl.
    >>
    >> I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite. Each to
    >> his own I guess.

    >
    > Then I guess you'd really like manju. I don't,
    > and for the same reasons I'm not fond of moon cake.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manj%C5%AB
    >
    > Manju looks good, right up to the point where
    > you bite into it. Then you discover it's full of
    > bean paste.


    Good eating, not everyone wants super sweet stuff. I like manju and make
    them often.

  9. #9
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    recipe please? Lee
    "George" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j47lnk$djn$[email protected]..
    > On 9/6/2011 8:05 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >> George wrote:
    >>>
    >>> On 9/6/2011 7:21 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    >>>> like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    >>>> anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    >>>> luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    >>>> nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    >>>> The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    >>>> I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.
    >>>
    >>> I am not big on pastries but what you described is the type I like. They
    >>> don't add tons of sugar. With typical pastries I get the impression I
    >>> could get the same result by getting a spoon and the sugar bowl.
    >>>
    >>> I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite. Each to
    >>> his own I guess.

    >>
    >> Then I guess you'd really like manju. I don't,
    >> and for the same reasons I'm not fond of moon cake.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manj%C5%AB
    >>
    >> Manju looks good, right up to the point where
    >> you bite into it. Then you discover it's full of
    >> bean paste.

    >
    > Good eating, not everyone wants super sweet stuff. I like manju and make
    > them often.




  10. #10
    George Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On 9/7/2011 7:56 AM, Storrmmee wrote:
    > recipe please? Lee


    I do it just like this:

    http://japanesefood.about.com/od/jap.../manjucake.htm

    It is a basic dough with 4 ingredients.

    Sometimes I make the bean paste and sometimes I just buy a can of it.

    Kabocha filling is also good. Cook some peeled seeded kabocha and then
    add sugar and mash. About 1/2 cup sugar per pound is good or to taste.

  11. #11
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    thanks filed for future reference, Lee
    "George" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j47o8d$uth$[email protected]..
    > On 9/7/2011 7:56 AM, Storrmmee wrote:
    >> recipe please? Lee

    >
    > I do it just like this:
    >
    > http://japanesefood.about.com/od/jap.../manjucake.htm
    >
    > It is a basic dough with 4 ingredients.
    >
    > Sometimes I make the bean paste and sometimes I just buy a can of it.
    >
    > Kabocha filling is also good. Cook some peeled seeded kabocha and then add
    > sugar and mash. About 1/2 cup sugar per pound is good or to taste.




  12. #12
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 08:33:01 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 9/7/2011 7:56 AM, Storrmmee wrote:
    >> recipe please? Lee

    >
    >I do it just like this:
    >
    >http://japanesefood.about.com/od/jap.../manjucake.htm
    >
    >It is a basic dough with 4 ingredients.


    Did you look that one over well? most of the reviewers aren't as
    happy as a 3.9/5 stars would make you believe. A couple mention that
    it is dark colored- a couple others that it tastes too much of baking
    soda- others believe it should be rice flour rather than wheat.
    >
    >Sometimes I make the bean paste and sometimes I just buy a can of it.
    >
    >Kabocha filling is also good. Cook some peeled seeded kabocha and then
    >add sugar and mash. About 1/2 cup sugar per pound is good or to taste.


    Yum- I might try that variation while my beans are soaking.<g> I
    think my Sweet Dumpling squash *belong* in a sweet dumpling.<g> [I
    don't know why I didn't plant Kabocha-- maybe next year.]

    Jim

  13. #13
    monicakendle Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake


    'George[_1_ Wrote:
    > ;1658191']On 9/6/2011 7:21 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:-
    > It's moon cake season, as I can tell from the
    > free samples passed out at the Asian food store
    > on weekends. (Marina in Cupertino is best for
    > samples, Maxim seldom has samples of anything,
    > and Tin Tin closed several months ago.)
    >
    > After trying them once or twice, I turned them
    > down because I thought they were made from bean
    > paste and I don't eat beans. However, Wikipedia
    > informs me that traditionally they are made from
    > lotus seed paste, but cheaper ones may have white
    > kidney beans added as a filler.
    >
    > Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    > like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    > anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    > luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    > nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    > The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    > I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.-
    >
    > I am not big on pastries but what you described is the type I like. They
    >
    > don't add tons of sugar. With typical pastries I get the impression I
    > could get the same result by getting a spoon and the sugar bowl.
    >
    > I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite. Each to
    > his own I guess.
    > -
    >
    > I try to catch the latest news in the People's
    > Daily (semi-official newspaper of the Communist
    > Party of China), and they recently had an article
    > about the new tax on moon cakes.
    >
    > 'Let them eat cake, after tax - People's Daily Online'
    > (http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90780/7589199.html)
    >
    > Wow! Moon cakes are really expensive in China.
    > It's a ridiculous tax, for reasons mentioned in
    > the article. I suppose a "Moon Cake Party" could
    > get traction, until the authorities became aware
    > of it.
    >
    > Next time I'm offered a sample, I'll take it.
    > I should re-evaluate whether they are really as
    > uninteresting as I recall.
    >
    > I was thinking how a moon cake might be improved
    > in the direction I would like, and it occurred to
    > me that a lotus seed ganache might be interesting.
    > Googling "lotus seed ganache" gets exactly one hit
    > (probably more after I post this), so I'm not the
    > first person to think of this. I don't think I'll
    > bother trying to make it, though. Lotus seeds
    > don't have much flavor, nor an interesting texture.
    > Maybe I'll change my mind after having another
    > sample.-


    What's the nutritional value of a Moon Cake? I'm trying to find a way to
    talk myself into believing just a little bit of Moon Cake won't hurt.




    --
    monicakendle

  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > It's moon cake season, as I can tell from the
    > free samples passed out at the Asian food store
    > on weekends. (Marina in Cupertino is best for
    > samples, Maxim seldom has samples of anything,
    > and Tin Tin closed several months ago.)
    >
    > After trying them once or twice, I turned them
    > down because I thought they were made from bean
    > paste and I don't eat beans. However, Wikipedia
    > informs me that traditionally they are made from
    > lotus seed paste, but cheaper ones may have white
    > kidney beans added as a filler.
    >
    > Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    > like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    > anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    > luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    > nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    > The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    > I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.
    >
    > I try to catch the latest news in the People's
    > Daily (semi-official newspaper of the Communist
    > Party of China), and they recently had an article
    > about the new tax on moon cakes.
    >
    > http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90780/7589199.html
    >
    > Wow! Moon cakes are really expensive in China.
    > It's a ridiculous tax, for reasons mentioned in
    > the article. I suppose a "Moon Cake Party" could
    > get traction, until the authorities became aware
    > of it.
    >
    > Next time I'm offered a sample, I'll take it.
    > I should re-evaluate whether they are really as
    > uninteresting as I recall.
    >
    > I was thinking how a moon cake might be improved
    > in the direction I would like, and it occurred to
    > me that a lotus seed ganache might be interesting.
    > Googling "lotus seed ganache" gets exactly one hit
    > (probably more after I post this), so I'm not the
    > first person to think of this. I don't think I'll
    > bother trying to make it, though. Lotus seeds
    > don't have much flavor, nor an interesting texture.
    > Maybe I'll change my mind after having another
    > sample.


    I have to concur. I have bought moon cakes several times,
    thinking that surely the boring ones I've had must be anomalies.
    That seems not to be the case.

    --
    Jean B.

  15. #15
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > George wrote:
    >> On 9/6/2011 7:21 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> Either way, I don't much like them. They look
    >>> like fine pastries, and to Western sensibilities
    >>> anything that looks like that should be sweet and
    >>> luscious. Moon cakes are sweetened, but not
    >>> nearly as much as I'd expect in a pastry filling.
    >>> The filling is also dense, like peanut butter.
    >>> I'd expect a much lighter filling in a pastry.

    >> I am not big on pastries but what you described is the type I like. They
    >> don't add tons of sugar. With typical pastries I get the impression I
    >> could get the same result by getting a spoon and the sugar bowl.
    >>
    >> I also like those types of fillings. Red bean is my favorite. Each to
    >> his own I guess.

    >
    > Then I guess you'd really like manju. I don't,
    > and for the same reasons I'm not fond of moon cake.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manj%C5%AB
    >
    > Manju looks good, right up to the point where
    > you bite into it. Then you discover it's full of
    > bean paste.


    I should add that I rather LIKE various bean paste offerings, but
    that does not extend to moon cakes. Their fillings are denser and
    less flavorful than, say, those in mochi.

    --
    Jean B.

  16. #16
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On 9/7/2011 10:00 AM, Jean B. wrote:
    >
    > I should add that I rather LIKE various bean paste offerings, but that
    > does not extend to moon cakes. Their fillings are denser and less
    > flavorful than, say, those in mochi.
    >


    I think that stuff you're talking about is black sugar filling. I'm not
    a big fan of that. I do like the fruity filling that they add to the
    Chinese wedding cakes, which is quite similar to a moon cake except for
    the filling.

    I used to like the green mochi with the white bean filling when I was a
    kid and never did like the azuki filling. These days I'm appreciating
    the azuki filling more. They make a mochi with peanut butter filling
    that evidently, people like but it's kinda repulsive to me.

    We can get manju, mochi, and dorayaki in most stores. Boy I could go for
    a dorayaki right now!

  17. #17
    George Guest

    Default Re: Moon Cake

    On 9/7/2011 11:19 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
    > On Wed, 07 Sep 2011 08:33:01 -0400, George<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On 9/7/2011 7:56 AM, Storrmmee wrote:
    >>> recipe please? Lee

    >>
    >> I do it just like this:
    >>
    >> http://japanesefood.about.com/od/jap.../manjucake.htm
    >>
    >> It is a basic dough with 4 ingredients.

    >
    > Did you look that one over well? most of the reviewers aren't as
    > happy as a 3.9/5 stars would make you believe. A couple mention that
    > it is dark colored- a couple others that it tastes too much of baking
    > soda- others believe it should be rice flour rather than wheat.
    >>
    >> Sometimes I make the bean paste and sometimes I just buy a can of it.
    >>
    >> Kabocha filling is also good. Cook some peeled seeded kabocha and then
    >> add sugar and mash. About 1/2 cup sugar per pound is good or to taste.

    >
    > Yum- I might try that variation while my beans are soaking.<g> I
    > think my Sweet Dumpling squash *belong* in a sweet dumpling.<g> [I
    > don't know why I didn't plant Kabocha-- maybe next year.]
    >
    > Jim


    Good catch, the ingredients were correct but I use half of the amount of
    baking powder listed.

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