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Thread: mixed congee

  1. #1
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default mixed congee

    anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?

    http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg

    I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast


  2. #2
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee


    On 12-Sep-2012, tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:

    > anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp,
    > other..?
    >
    > http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >
    > I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast


    It certainly needs some protein; but, I'd skip the toast. A can of this
    stuff is 87% carbs, and only 7% protein. If that is your breakfast, you'd
    benefit from adding a couple of prunes for fiber and the low fat content
    would make most meats and acceptable side.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 18:40:46 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle wrote:

    > anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?
    >
    > http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >
    > I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast


    That's just American ignorance talking. I'm not a fan of congee
    except in 7 Courses of Beef, but you they're laughing at you, too.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 19:11:43 GMT, l, not -l wrote:

    > On 12-Sep-2012, tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp,
    >> other..?
    >>
    >> http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >>
    >> I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast

    >
    > It certainly needs some protein; but, I'd skip the toast. A can of this
    > stuff is 87% carbs, and only 7% protein. If that is your breakfast, you'd
    > benefit from adding a couple of prunes for fiber and the low fat content
    > would make most meats and acceptable side.


    I thought you were Asian-friendly.

    -sw

  5. #5
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On 9/12/2012 8:40 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?
    >
    > http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >
    > I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast
    >


    It's an interesting product. I've never seen a soup like that before so
    I don't know what would be appropriate as a side. My suggestion is that
    you use the product to make vegetable beef soup. I'll check it out if I
    ever see it in the store.

    Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    rice porridge - not bean soup though.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 21:14:51 -1000, dsi1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 9/12/2012 8:40 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > > anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?
    > >
    > > http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    > >
    > > I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast
    > >

    >
    > It's an interesting product. I've never seen a soup like that before so
    > I don't know what would be appropriate as a side. My suggestion is that
    > you use the product to make vegetable beef soup. I'll check it out if I
    > ever see it in the store.
    >
    > Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    > congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    > make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    > mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    > finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    > rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    > and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    > rice porridge - not bean soup though.


    Exactly. It's amazing the cr*p they stick a random word on and then
    stupid white people think that's what it is in real life. I used to
    do the chicken broth and ginger with rice for my kids when they were
    sick and DD says she still craves it when she doesn't feel well.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  7. #7
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee


    On 13-Sep-2012, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 19:11:43 GMT, l, not -l wrote:
    >
    > > On 12-Sep-2012, tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp,
    > >> other..?
    > >>
    > >> http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    > >>
    > >> I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast

    > >
    > > It certainly needs some protein; but, I'd skip the toast. A can of this
    > > stuff is 87% carbs, and only 7% protein. If that is your breakfast,
    > > you'd
    > > benefit from adding a couple of prunes for fiber and the low fat content
    > > would make most meats and acceptable side.

    >
    > I thought you were Asian-friendly.
    >
    > -sw


    I hold equal disdain for all; I just don't feel compelled to show it every
    usenet post.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  8. #8
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On 9/13/2012 3:05 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 21:14:51 -1000, dsi1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 9/12/2012 8:40 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >>> anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?
    >>>
    >>> http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >>>
    >>> I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast
    >>>

    >>
    >> It's an interesting product. I've never seen a soup like that before so
    >> I don't know what would be appropriate as a side. My suggestion is that
    >> you use the product to make vegetable beef soup. I'll check it out if I
    >> ever see it in the store.
    >>
    >> Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    >> congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    >> make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    >> mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    >> finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    >> rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    >> and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    >> rice porridge - not bean soup though.

    >
    > Exactly. It's amazing the cr*p they stick a random word on and then
    > stupid white people think that's what it is in real life. I used to
    > do the chicken broth and ginger with rice for my kids when they were
    > sick and DD says she still craves it when she doesn't feel well.
    >


    It is a word that I'd like to stay away from. An interesting thing about
    the soup is that cooking rice and salt creates a substance similar to
    MSG, at least that's what I'm tasting. It's kind of a neat thing.

  9. #9
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    dsi1 wrote:
    > On 9/12/2012 8:40 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >> anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?
    >>
    >> http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >>
    >> I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast
    >>

    >
    > It's an interesting product. I've never seen a soup like that before so
    > I don't know what would be appropriate as a side. My suggestion is that
    > you use the product to make vegetable beef soup. I'll check it out if I
    > ever see it in the store.
    >
    > Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    > congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    > make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    > mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    > finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    > rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    > and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    > rice porridge - not bean soup though.


    I got this as a result of talking with someone from China about how she
    doesn't like the food here. She said everything is Americanized which
    surprises me considering the big asian population here in Seattle, but
    what do I know, I am a white guy with a few Vietnamese friends who all
    eat the Americanized stuff because they're American. Anyhow I mentioned
    that when I was in China & Taiwan etc way back when my recollection of
    the food is that it was really oily, and she said that's restaurant food.
    Same idea here right? The food in restaurants tends to be heavier and
    saltier. Anyhow she does all her cooking in a rice cooker -- I guess
    that is an acceptable solution to the problem of being a grad student
    away from your source of home cooking -- and she usually has the canned
    mixed congee for breakfast. I joked about drinking it straight from the
    can but refrained from any remarks about breakfast of champions. It's
    in the fridge right now. I had been carrying it around in my bag as
    emergency nutrition and an opportunity arose yesterday but I also had a
    bunch of prunes that needed to be eaten soon so went with the devil I
    know. The can is in the fridge right now. I'll try it for breakfast
    one of these days, with bacon and an egg and coffee.


  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 06:30:58 -1000, dsi1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 9/13/2012 3:05 AM, sf wrote:
    > > On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 21:14:51 -1000, dsi1
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    > >> congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    > >> make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    > >> mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    > >> finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    > >> rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    > >> and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    > >> rice porridge - not bean soup though.

    > >
    > > Exactly. It's amazing the cr*p they stick a random word on and then
    > > stupid white people think that's what it is in real life. I used to
    > > do the chicken broth and ginger with rice for my kids when they were
    > > sick and DD says she still craves it when she doesn't feel well.
    > >

    >
    > It is a word that I'd like to stay away from.


    I think ginger-chicken soup with rice is the one my SIL calls Arroz
    Caldo.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #11
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On 9/13/2012 6:49 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > dsi1 wrote:
    >> On 9/12/2012 8:40 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >>> anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp, other..?
    >>>
    >>> http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >>>
    >>> I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast
    >>>

    >>
    >> It's an interesting product. I've never seen a soup like that before so
    >> I don't know what would be appropriate as a side. My suggestion is that
    >> you use the product to make vegetable beef soup. I'll check it out if I
    >> ever see it in the store.
    >>
    >> Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    >> congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    >> make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    >> mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    >> finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    >> rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    >> and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    >> rice porridge - not bean soup though.

    >
    > I got this as a result of talking with someone from China about how she
    > doesn't like the food here. She said everything is Americanized which
    > surprises me considering the big asian population here in Seattle, but
    > what do I know, I am a white guy with a few Vietnamese friends who all
    > eat the Americanized stuff because they're American. Anyhow I mentioned
    > that when I was in China & Taiwan etc way back when my recollection of
    > the food is that it was really oily, and she said that's restaurant food.
    > Same idea here right? The food in restaurants tends to be heavier and
    > saltier. Anyhow she does all her cooking in a rice cooker -- I guess
    > that is an acceptable solution to the problem of being a grad student
    > away from your source of home cooking -- and she usually has the canned
    > mixed congee for breakfast. I joked about drinking it straight from the
    > can but refrained from any remarks about breakfast of champions. It's
    > in the fridge right now. I had been carrying it around in my bag as
    > emergency nutrition and an opportunity arose yesterday but I also had a
    > bunch of prunes that needed to be eaten soon so went with the devil I
    > know. The can is in the fridge right now. I'll try it for breakfast
    > one of these days, with bacon and an egg and coffee.
    >


    Thanks for the info. How much does a can of this product cost? My guess
    is that you could eat this for breakfast but it's not going to seem like
    breakfast. I chalk that up to cultural differences. The traditional
    Japanese breakfast is miso soup and rice and a few other small things. I
    suspect the Chinese could have something similar as their first meal of
    the day. When we complete the Americanization of Asia, they will be
    eating bacon and eggs and toast. Hoo-hah!

    I've been trying to cook stuff in our small rice cooker. I like the
    efficiency and speed and automatic nature of cooking this way. Oddly
    enough instant mashed potatoes work fine. It works fine for making those
    small packages of corn bread. It doesn't cook the top fully so I stuck
    it in the microwave for 2 minutes and it was a great corn bread. Better
    than baking it in a square pan. My wife was surprised because she never
    saw me making it. It's a super fast way to make CB. The next day I fried
    it and ate it with maple syrup - oh boy!

  12. #12
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On 9/13/2012 8:20 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 06:30:58 -1000, dsi1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 9/13/2012 3:05 AM, sf wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 21:14:51 -1000, dsi1
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Congee is a comfort food over here but we call it jook or chook, never
    >>>> congee. We'll typically make it with leftover thanksgiving turkey. We'll
    >>>> make it when someone in the house is ill. I used to make it for my
    >>>> mother-in-law when she was having a bad day. For a sick person, adding
    >>>> finely chopped ginger is a good idea. Mostly you just boil some leftover
    >>>> rice with some chicken or turkey stock. I like to add ****ake mushrooms
    >>>> and celery, if I got it but the sky's the limit. It should look like
    >>>> rice porridge - not bean soup though.
    >>>
    >>> Exactly. It's amazing the cr*p they stick a random word on and then
    >>> stupid white people think that's what it is in real life. I used to
    >>> do the chicken broth and ginger with rice for my kids when they were
    >>> sick and DD says she still craves it when she doesn't feel well.
    >>>

    >>
    >> It is a word that I'd like to stay away from.

    >
    > I think ginger-chicken soup with rice is the one my SIL calls Arroz
    > Caldo.
    >


    I certainly could eat that for breakfast. The usual breakfast fare makes
    me feel a little ill.

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: mixed congee

    On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 15:59:44 GMT, l, not -l wrote:

    > On 13-Sep-2012, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 12 Sep 2012 19:11:43 GMT, l, not -l wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 12-Sep-2012, tert in seattle <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> anyone eat mixed congee? do you eat it chilled, heated, room temp,
    >>>> other..?
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.ftupet.com/upload/mixedcongee.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm thinking it needs a side of bacon or sausage, and some toast
    >>>
    >>> It certainly needs some protein; but, I'd skip the toast. A can of this
    >>> stuff is 87% carbs, and only 7% protein. If that is your breakfast,
    >>> you'd
    >>> benefit from adding a couple of prunes for fiber and the low fat content
    >>> would make most meats and acceptable side.

    >>
    >> I thought you were Asian-friendly.

    >
    > I hold equal disdain for all; I just don't feel compelled to show it every
    > usenet post.


    I hold you as knowledgeable person on the subject, FWIW. I have no
    idea what your background is and I've never asked. But still.

    -sw

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