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Thread: Mirepoix

  1. #1
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Mirepoix

    I am upstairs and the odor from the Crockpot full of short ribs braising in
    red wine & broth is delightful as it wafts throughout the house. There is a
    marked sweetness which I believe comes from the sautéed onion celery &
    carrot.


    I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under the meat
    when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only downside is the need to
    compensate for the sweetness when making a gravy or sauce

    Do you still use it?


    --
    Dimitri

    Soon

    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.



  2. #2
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix



    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > I am upstairs and the odor from the Crockpot full of short ribs braising in
    > red wine & broth is delightful as it wafts throughout the house. There is a
    > marked sweetness which I believe comes from the sautéed onion celery &
    > carrot.
    >
    > I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under the meat
    > when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only downside is the need to
    > compensate for the sweetness when making a gravy or sauce
    >
    > Do you still use it?
    >
    > --
    > Dimitri



    Yes! No reason not to use it. If there's enough onion and celery, the
    carrot sweetness is minimised.

  3. #3
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    Dimitri wrote:
    > I am upstairs and the odor from the Crockpot full of short ribs braising
    > in red wine & broth is delightful as it wafts throughout the house.
    > There is a marked sweetness which I believe comes from the sautéed onion
    > celery & carrot.
    >
    >
    > I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under the
    > meat when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only downside is
    > the need to compensate for the sweetness when making a gravy or sauce
    >
    > Do you still use it?
    >
    >



    More often onion, celery, and garlic rather than carrot. You're right
    about the sweetness but if you don't put the carrot in you don't have to
    compensate for it.

    gloria p

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    In article <dKasn.86874$[email protected]>,
    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am upstairs and the odor from the Crockpot full of short ribs braising in
    > red wine & broth is delightful as it wafts throughout the house. There is a
    > marked sweetness which I believe comes from the sautéed onion celery &
    > carrot.
    >
    >
    > I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under the meat
    > when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only downside is the need to
    > compensate for the sweetness when making a gravy or sauce
    >
    > Do you still use it?


    Always.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "We're all adults here, except for those of us who aren't." --Blake Murphy

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    In article <dKasn.86874$[email protected]>,
    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am upstairs and the odor


    Aroma, D, aroma. "-)

    > from the Crockpot full of short ribs braising in
    > red wine & broth is delightful as it wafts throughout the house. There is a
    > marked sweetness which I believe comes from the sautéed onion celery &
    > carrot.
    >
    >
    > I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under the meat
    > when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only downside is the need to
    > compensate for the sweetness when making a gravy or sauce
    >
    > Do you still use it?


    I didn't get that memo.


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010

  6. #6
    JakartaDean Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    Dimitri wrote:
    > I am upstairs and the odor from the Crockpot full of short ribs braising
    > in red wine & broth is delightful as it wafts throughout the house.
    > There is a marked sweetness which I believe comes from the sautéed onion
    > celery & carrot.
    >
    >
    > I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under the
    > meat when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only downside is
    > the need to compensate for the sweetness when making a gravy or sauce
    >
    > Do you still use it?
    >

    I often use mirepoix when braising lamb shanks, which is one of my
    standby dishes lately. I guess the carrots add sweetness, but so does
    the lamb so some acid is needed anyway.

    Dean

  7. #7
    Barry in Indy Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 17:24:09 -0700, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Yes! No reason not to use it. If there's enough onion and celery, the
    >carrot sweetness is minimised.


    I can't remember the last time I had a sweet carrot. They seem to be
    bland these days. (Of course, this may be due to my age.)

    Barry in Indy

  8. #8
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    Dimitri wrote:

    > I really find the old standard of using a Mirepoix as a base under
    > the meat when braising adds a great depth of flavor. The only
    > downside is the need to compensate for the sweetness when making a
    > gravy or sauce
    > Do you still use it?


    Yes, and sometimes vary it: less carrot if I don't want sweetness, less
    celery if I want it's scent to be limited. I make it even without carrots,
    sometimes, but then it's no more a mirepoix, I fear. Just "soffritto".
    --
    Vilco
    Don't think pink: drink rosè




  9. #9
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix



    Barry in Indy wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 17:24:09 -0700, Arri London <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Yes! No reason not to use it. If there's enough onion and celery, the
    > >carrot sweetness is minimised.

    >
    > I can't remember the last time I had a sweet carrot. They seem to be
    > bland these days. (Of course, this may be due to my age.)
    >
    > Barry in Indy


    For something like a mirepoix, we tend to use the larger carrots. They
    aren't ever sweet anyway.
    Try the thinner, less woody carrots. Those *can* be very sweet.

  10. #10
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Mirepoix

    Barry in Indy wrote:
    > On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 17:24:09 -0700, Arri London <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Yes! No reason not to use it. If there's enough onion and celery, the
    >> carrot sweetness is minimised.

    >
    > I can't remember the last time I had a sweet carrot. They seem to be
    > bland these days. (Of course, this may be due to my age.)
    >
    > Barry in Indy



    We grew carrots in our small garden for the first time in a long time
    last summer because we knew our young grandson would enjoy harvesting
    them. He brought the first one into the house to wash off the dirt,
    took a bit and said "Is that what carrots are SUPPOSED to taste like?"

    It was much sweeter than typical grocery store carrots.

    gloria p

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