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Thread: A memorable meal

  1. #1
    gloria.p Guest

    Default A memorable meal



    Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.
    Too tired to cook, we went to our neighborhood Italian restaurant and
    each had one of the nightly specials. They were sooooo good! I had a
    baked boneless chicken breast topped with roasted red peppers and
    Fontina cheese, with a side pasta Alfredo. Husband had seafood
    canneloni, filled with big chunks of lobster and crab and shrimp, baked
    with a creamy tomato sauce. Holy cow, they were good.

    Sometimes it's good thing NOT to order your old faithful menu favorite.

    gloria p

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    On Wed 17 Mar 2010 08:09:02p, gloria.p told us...

    >
    >
    > Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.
    > Too tired to cook, we went to our neighborhood Italian restaurant and
    > each had one of the nightly specials. They were sooooo good! I had a
    > baked boneless chicken breast topped with roasted red peppers and
    > Fontina cheese, with a side pasta Alfredo. Husband had seafood
    > canneloni, filled with big chunks of lobster and crab and shrimp, baked
    > with a creamy tomato sauce. Holy cow, they were good.
    >
    > Sometimes it's good thing NOT to order your old faithful menu favorite.
    >
    > gloria p
    >


    Both meals sound delicious, Gloria. I agree, one should step off the
    beaten path at times. Some new dishes soon become old favorites.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  3. #3
    PLucas1 Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in news:hns5gk$ap5$1@news.eternal-
    september.org:

    >
    >
    > Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.



    You work, he plays!!!!

    What sort of work do you do at the airport??


    > Too tired to cook, we went to our neighborhood Italian restaurant and
    > each had one of the nightly specials. They were sooooo good! I had a
    > baked boneless chicken breast topped with roasted red peppers and
    > Fontina cheese, with a side pasta Alfredo. Husband had seafood
    > canneloni, filled with big chunks of lobster and crab and shrimp, baked
    > with a creamy tomato sauce. Holy cow, they were good.




    I'd have gone a dish of what your husband had.... mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm,
    lobster, crab, prawns, mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm :-)


    >
    > Sometimes it's good thing NOT to order your old faithful menu favorite.
    >



    Trying something new each time can be fun.


    You didn't take any pics??


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

    Edmund Burke.

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:

    > Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.


    Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    that they can't hire people for?

    I kinda have this thing about for-profit companies who ask for
    volunteers, but I guess most airports are actually public entities,
    so it wouldn't be totally unusual.

    -sw

  5. #5
    Dale P Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hns5gk$ap5$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.
    > Too tired to cook, we went to our neighborhood Italian restaurant and each
    > had one of the nightly specials. They were sooooo good! I had a baked
    > boneless chicken breast topped with roasted red peppers and Fontina
    > cheese, with a side pasta Alfredo. Husband had seafood canneloni, filled
    > with big chunks of lobster and crab and shrimp, baked with a creamy tomato
    > sauce. Holy cow, they were good.
    >
    > Sometimes it's good thing NOT to order your old faithful menu favorite.
    >
    > gloria p



    Sounds wonderful!! Especially the seafood cannelloni.

    I worked all day on getting ready for the move, and I am exhausted. A
    friend came over to help us lug stuff up from the basement. We were all
    tired, sweaty, and hungry. I went over to a local Chinese carry out joint.
    The food is typical middle of the US Chinese fare. It was good and filling,
    which is what we wanted. Your dinner sounds much better. Off to bed, as I
    am beat!

    Dale P


  6. #6
    Paco Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal



    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >
    >> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >
    > Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    > that they can't hire people for?
    >
    > I kinda have this thing about for-profit companies who ask for
    > volunteers, but I guess most airports are actually public entities,
    > so it wouldn't be totally unusual.
    >
    > -sw


    I believe she is a USO volunteer. Many larger airports have a USO office,
    or at the least a "table" to greet returning military personnel, thank them
    for their service, lend assistance with directions, etc. Also to show
    support to departing personnel.


  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    In article <hns5gk$ap5$[email protected]>,
    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.
    > Too tired to cook, we went to our neighborhood Italian restaurant and
    > each had one of the nightly specials. They were sooooo good! I had a
    > baked boneless chicken breast topped with roasted red peppers and
    > Fontina cheese, with a side pasta Alfredo. Husband had seafood
    > canneloni, filled with big chunks of lobster and crab and shrimp, baked
    > with a creamy tomato sauce. Holy cow, they were good.
    >
    > Sometimes it's good thing NOT to order your old faithful menu favorite.
    >
    > gloria p


    Sounds memorable indeed. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  8. #8
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 22:25:55 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >
    >> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >
    >Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    >that they can't hire people for?
    >
    >I kinda have this thing about for-profit companies who ask for
    >volunteers, but I guess most airports are actually public entities,
    >so it wouldn't be totally unusual.


    There wouldn't be PGA, LPGA or senior tour tourmanets period if they
    didn't have huge numbers of volunteers and all the volunteers get out
    of it is a really ugly uniform,

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

  9. #9
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

    > There wouldn't be PGA, LPGA or senior tour tourmanets period if they
    > didn't have huge numbers of volunteers and all the volunteers get out
    > of it is a really ugly uniform,
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >

    Ohmygosh...So true! Volunteers LOVE to volunteer to work at The Masters
    in Augusta!! And many get a *great* uniform to wear and keep.

    Many groups offer services at airports, yet aren't employees nor
    represent the airport. Doesn't Gloria P volunteer with the USO or
    something like that??
    Goomba

  10. #10
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    PLucas1 wrote:
    > "gloria.p" <gpuest[email protected]> wrote in news:hns5gk$ap5$1@news.eternal-
    > september.org:
    >
    >>
    >> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >
    >
    > You work, he plays!!!!
    >
    > What sort of work do you do at the airport??
    >
    >



    I'm a volunteer "Ambassador" a couple of days a month. We help people
    navigate their way through the airport. It's an unpaid service but we
    do get to park free in the employees' lot including when we travel.
    Mainly we answer a couple of the same questions over and over again:

    "Yes, there are lots more restaurants once you go through security
    and get near your gate."

    "Yes, there are smoking lounges on each concourse."

    "Yes, you have to take the train to get to concourses B and C."

    "Yes, you have to go back through security to get to your gate. When
    you took the train and emerged in the main terminal you left the secured
    area."

    Actually my husband was skiing but also carrying out HIS volunteer
    service at Copper Mt. where their Ambassadors help people to navigate
    the slopes and the base areas. Our ski areas are large enough so people
    occasionally get lost when they take the wrong trail down from the top.
    The perk for a required number of days of service is a free season pass.

    Retired people need to do what they can to minimize expenses. ;-)

    gloria p

  11. #11
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >
    >> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >
    > Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    > that they can't hire people for?
    >


    We do all the grunt stuff that paid people can't be bothered to do.
    We answer questions, escort people who are lost or afraid, meet people
    at the plane when requested by a family member, direct people to the
    right baggage claim when they reach the terminal and, hand out and help
    people fill out he immigration and customs forms at International
    Arrivals. We have ongoing training sessions covering "what's new" and
    both airport and airline employees often stop to ask questions and
    directions from us.

    > I kinda have this thing about for-profit companies who ask for
    > volunteers, but I guess most airports are actually public entities,
    > so it wouldn't be totally unusual.
    >
    > -sw


    We are the volunteer arm of Guest Services for the City and County of
    Denver. The program began a year before the airport opened, to provide
    tour guides for VIPs who were on boondoggle tours of inspection. A
    month after the official opening, the program was supposed to go out of
    existence but the airlines requested that the city continue it because
    people were so confused by the size and scope of the airport:

    http://www.flydenver.com/maps/index.asp

    gloria p

  12. #12
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    Paco wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >>
    >>> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >>
    >> Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    >> that they can't hire people for?
    >>
    >> I kinda have this thing about for-profit companies who ask for
    >> volunteers, but I guess most airports are actually public entities,
    >> so it wouldn't be totally unusual.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > I believe she is a USO volunteer. Many larger airports have a USO
    > office, or at the least a "table" to greet returning military personnel,
    > thank them for their service, lend assistance with directions, etc.
    > Also to show support to departing personnel.



    Nope. We do have a USO but the Ambassador program does all that for
    the general public. We do direct service folks to the USO but they have
    their own set of volunteers, mostly retired service people.

    gloria p

  13. #13
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >
    > > Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >
    > Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    > that they can't hire people for?


    Baggage handlers. They get to keep 10% of what
    they handle. :-)

  14. #14
    Paco Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal



    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hnu6n2$m60$[email protected]..
    > Paco wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.
    >>>
    >>> Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    >>> that they can't hire people for?
    >>>
    >>> I kinda have this thing about for-profit companies who ask for
    >>> volunteers, but I guess most airports are actually public entities,
    >>> so it wouldn't be totally unusual.
    >>>
    >>> -sw

    >>
    >> I believe she is a USO volunteer. Many larger airports have a USO
    >> office, or at the least a "table" to greet returning military personnel,
    >> thank them for their service, lend assistance with directions, etc. Also
    >> to show support to departing personnel.

    >
    >
    > Nope. We do have a USO but the Ambassador program does all that for
    > the general public. We do direct service folks to the USO but they have
    > their own set of volunteers, mostly retired service people.
    >
    > gloria p


    Oops! Sorry, guess I misremembered! I'm sure the City of Denver
    appreciates your enthusiasm and civic pride.


  15. #15
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 15:29:20 -0600, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'm a volunteer "Ambassador" a couple of days a month. We help people
    >navigate their way through the airport. It's an unpaid service but we
    >do get to park free in the employees' lot including when we travel.
    >Mainly we answer a couple of the same questions over and over again:


    <snip>

    Girl, I am well aware that the Denver airport is actually in Kansas
    <veg> and I do hope you're getting some remuneration for your travel.
    Jaysus. After you get the hell and gone off the 70, you've got 9 miles
    from the interstate to the airport - and that's if the snow fences
    work (which they don't). Good on ya for doing a good service, but how
    far is your commute?? And the Denver airport isn't that
    complicated...unless the tram gets jammed up or someone mistakes the
    airport for a giant bunch of tipis.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 22:39:01 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > And the Denver airport isn't that
    > complicated...unless the tram gets jammed up or someone mistakes the
    > airport for a giant bunch of tipis.


    You're talking like a big city girl... which most travelers are not.

    --
    http://picasaweb.google.com/sf.usenet

  17. #17
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 21:09:02 -0600, gloria.p wrote:
    >>
    >>> Tuesday I volunteered at the airport all day and husband skied.

    >> Just out of curiosity, what does an airport need volunteers to do
    >> that they can't hire people for?

    >
    > Baggage handlers. They get to keep 10% of what
    > they handle. :-)



    Hah! The "baggage" we handle is a very different kind: stress,
    confusion, impatience, worry, loss of direction, language difficulty,
    and (often) meltdowns. I'm always amazed at how many people leave
    their common sense at home when they travel.

    gloria p

  18. #18
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 15:29:20 -0600, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm a volunteer "Ambassador" a couple of days a month. We help people
    >> navigate their way through the airport.


    >
    > Girl, I am well aware that the Denver airport is actually in Kansas
    > <veg> and I do hope you're getting some remuneration for your travel.
    > Jaysus. After you get the hell and gone off the 70, you've got 9 miles
    > from the interstate to the airport - and that's if the snow fences
    > work (which they don't). Good on ya for doing a good service, but how
    > far is your commute?? And the Denver airport isn't that
    > complicated...unless the tram gets jammed up or someone mistakes the
    > airport for a giant bunch of tipis.
    >



    It's about 25 miles each way and we are excused from our shift when it
    snows hard--they don't want an additional bunch of people stranded out
    there putting an additional burden on the available cots, blankets,
    food, and other limited resources. We are committed for 12 hours/month.

    You'd be amazed at how befuddled people get when they walk off the plane
    or into the main terminal from the airline check-in kiosks. Many first
    timers expect to see the planes lined up under the tent roof and want to
    know "OK, where's my plane?" People have told me "This airport is
    bigger than my whole town!" They walk to the center of their concourse
    and want to know where their rental car and baggage is. They can't
    believe they have walked that far (Concourse B is 3/4 mile from one end
    to the other)and still have to take the train to the terminal. A whole
    bunch want suggestions about where to go for lunch or a drink.

    BTW, there is an ongoing split in opinion about the tent roof. Half the
    people think it looks like a tipi/teepee village, the other half agree
    with the architect that it mirrors the peaks of the Rockies, visible in
    the distance.

    OB food: Loads of people ask "Where should I go for lunch?" After
    giving them a pretty thorough rundown of each of the restaurant menus in
    the area, I'm amused to see many of them head into McDonald's.

    gloria p

  19. #19
    PLucas1 Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ho0ag2$5cd$1@news.eternal-
    september.org:


    >
    > OB food: Loads of people ask "Where should I go for lunch?" After
    > giving them a pretty thorough rundown of each of the restaurant menus in
    > the area, I'm amused to see many of them head into McDonald's.
    >



    Heathens!!!

    Either that, or they're just down from Podunk, Hicksville, and the local
    'cafe' only serves 'coons and possum!!


    (I just watched one of those shows on the Travel and Living network last
    night.... Bizarre Foods..... and he was up in the Appalachian Mountains with
    some Tennessee 'hill people'.... they had a BBQ and served up whole roasted
    'coon and possum, cracked the skulls open and spread the brains on
    'hardtack'.)




    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

    Edmund Burke.

  20. #20
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: A memorable meal

    On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 10:58:35 -0600, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    <snip>

    Well, blessings on your head, Gloria. I don't know that I'd have the
    patience.

    >BTW, there is an ongoing split in opinion about the tent roof. Half the
    >people think it looks like a tipi/teepee village, the other half agree
    >with the architect that it mirrors the peaks of the Rockies, visible in
    >the distance.


    I *know* what the architect set out to create, but you'd have to be
    nearly blind to think they resembled the Rockies. Anyway, IIRC, coming
    in from I-70 on the airport road, you're going north and the Rockies
    are over there <pointing west>. 'Course, if the Rockies backdropped
    the airport, it'd look even sillier, IMHO.
    >
    >OB food: Loads of people ask "Where should I go for lunch?" After
    >giving them a pretty thorough rundown of each of the restaurant menus in
    >the area, I'm amused to see many of them head into McDonald's.


    McDonald's must have some major mojo with airport commissions, b/c I
    think there's a Mickey D's in every airport that has concessions
    (except Long Beach, which is nearly concession-less, anyway). Flying
    in and out of John Wayne in SoCal, I'm always bumfuzzled at the long
    lines - and, then there's the inevitable $tarbuck$ which, I swear, you
    would find on Mars.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
    if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
    and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
    it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines

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