Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Meatloaf

  1. #1
    MayQueen Guest

    Default Meatloaf

    With the changing weather I've been more motivated to cook and make some
    of our comfort/cold weather foods.

    I got the usual ingredients for meatloaf and wanted to put some onions
    in it as well. In the past adding onions seemed to give us heartburn
    for some reason so this time I decided to saute the onions before. I
    chopped an onion into small pieces and got it to the point of
    carmelization. Added a little crushed garlic too. Added all that to
    the other meatloaf ingredients and cooked as usual. It really added a
    nice flavor to the loaf.

    We've been making sandwiches and generally just eating it for a few
    meals now.

    I wish I had thought of this before.
    --
    Queenie

    *** Be the change you wish to see in the world ***

  2. #2
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Nov 11, 10:10�am, MayQueen <m...@queenmay.com> wrote:
    > With the changing weather I've been more motivated to cook and make some
    > of our comfort/cold weather foods.
    >
    > I got the usual ingredients for meatloaf and wanted to put some onions
    > in it as well. �In the past adding onions seemed to give us heartburn


    You probably used too much onion and in too large pieces to fully
    cook.


    > for some reason so this time I decided to saute the onions before. �I
    > chopped an onion into small pieces and got it to the point of
    > carmelization. �Added a little crushed garlic too. �
    >
    > I wish I had thought of this before.



    You could have added dehy onions, plain and/or toasted (toasted adds
    better flavor than caramelized), or simply grind the onion (and other
    veggies) in with the meat. I think meat loaf turns out more flavorful
    and more moist with raw veggies... grinding the veggies in with the
    meat saves a tremendous amount of time and labor. Freshly ground meat
    tastes much better too, also you'll know what/who's in it. Most often
    when folks complain about their meat loaf not turning out well it's
    because they use preground mystery meat.

    One way to ensure a moist, nicely textured meat loaf is to grind in
    some raw potato (just scrub, no need to peel), grind in celery,
    carrot, peppers, mushrooms, parsley, any veggies, even your own bread/
    crackers (do yoose have any idea what's in packaged crumbs, yoose
    don't want to know). Dehy garlic (granulated) works better in meat
    loaf, sprinkle on the meat before grinding, raw garlic is too pungent
    and can't be blended in evenly.


  3. #3
    readandpost Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    i remember my mom saying that cooked onions was all she could have, or
    it was HEARTBURN CITY!

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:10:37 -0800, MayQueen <[email protected]> wrote:

    >With the changing weather I've been more motivated to cook and make some
    >of our comfort/cold weather foods.
    >
    >I got the usual ingredients for meatloaf and wanted to put some onions
    >in it as well. In the past adding onions seemed to give us heartburn
    >for some reason so this time I decided to saute the onions before. I
    >chopped an onion into small pieces and got it to the point of
    >carmelization. Added a little crushed garlic too. Added all that to
    >the other meatloaf ingredients and cooked as usual. It really added a
    >nice flavor to the loaf.
    >
    >We've been making sandwiches and generally just eating it for a few
    >meals now.
    >
    >I wish I had thought of this before.


    Glass half full: "It's never too late!"


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  5. #5
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:45:58 -0800 (PST), Sheldon <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Nov 11, 10:10?am, MayQueen <m...@queenmay.com> wrote:
    >> With the changing weather I've been more motivated to cook and make some
    >> of our comfort/cold weather foods.
    >>
    >> I got the usual ingredients for meatloaf and wanted to put some onions
    >> in it as well. ?In the past adding onions seemed to give us heartburn

    >
    >You probably used too much onion and in too large pieces to fully
    >cook.
    >
    >
    >> for some reason so this time I decided to saute the onions before. ?I
    >> chopped an onion into small pieces and got it to the point of
    >> carmelization. ?Added a little crushed garlic too. ?
    >>
    >> I wish I had thought of this before.

    >
    >
    >You could have added dehy onions, plain and/or toasted (toasted adds
    >better flavor than caramelized), or simply grind the onion (and other
    >veggies) in with the meat. I think meat loaf turns out more flavorful
    >and more moist with raw veggies... grinding the veggies in with the
    >meat saves a tremendous amount of time and labor. Freshly ground meat
    >tastes much better too, also you'll know what/who's in it. Most often
    >when folks complain about their meat loaf not turning out well it's
    >because they use preground mystery meat.
    >
    >One way to ensure a moist, nicely textured meat loaf is to grind in
    >some raw potato (just scrub, no need to peel), grind in celery,
    >carrot, peppers, mushrooms, parsley, any veggies, even your own bread/
    >crackers (do yoose have any idea what's in packaged crumbs, yoose
    >don't want to know). Dehy garlic (granulated) works better in meat
    >loaf, sprinkle on the meat before grinding, raw garlic is too pungent
    >and can't be blended in evenly.


    I don't care how you make the meat up if it's packed in a pan and
    baked in it's own fat it's going to taste like crap. The ones on the
    pan in the picture below were done in a smoker but an oven will work.
    Just not as good.

    http://i31.tinypic.com/u2177.jpg

    Here's what you'll get:

    http://i25.tinypic.com/2q80tmt.jpg

    Lou

  6. #6
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Nov 11, 3:11�pm, Lou Decruss <M...@notvalid.com> wrote:
    > On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:45:58 -0800 (PST), Sheldon <PENMAR...@aol.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Nov 11, 10:10?am, MayQueen <m...@queenmay.com> wrote:
    > >> With the changing weather I've been more motivated to cook and make some
    > >> of our comfort/cold weather foods.

    >
    > >> I got the usual ingredients for meatloaf and wanted to put some onions
    > >> in it as well. ?In the past adding onions seemed to give us heartburn

    >
    > >You probably used too much onion and in too large pieces to fully
    > >cook.

    >
    > >> for some reason so this time I decided to saute the onions before. ?I
    > >> chopped an onion into small pieces and got it to the point of
    > >> carmelization. ?Added a little crushed garlic too. ?

    >
    > >> I wish I had thought of this before.

    >
    > >You could have added dehy onions, plain and/or toasted (toasted adds
    > >better flavor than caramelized), or simply grind the onion (and other
    > >veggies) in with the meat. �I think meat loaf turns out more flavorful
    > >and more moist with raw veggies... grinding the veggies in with the
    > >meat saves a tremendous amount of time and labor. �Freshly ground meat
    > >tastes much better too, also you'll know what/who's in it. �Mostoften
    > >when folks complain about their meat loaf not turning out well it's
    > >because they use preground mystery meat.

    >
    > >One way to ensure a moist, nicely textured meat loaf is to grind in
    > >some raw potato (just scrub, no need to peel), grind in celery,
    > >carrot, peppers, mushrooms, parsley, any veggies, even your own bread/
    > >crackers (do yoose have any idea what's in packaged crumbs, yoose
    > >don't want to know). �Dehy garlic (granulated) works better in meat
    > >loaf, sprinkle on the meat before grinding, raw garlic is too pungent
    > >and can't be blended in evenly.

    >
    > I don't care how you make the meat up if it's packed in a pan and
    > baked in it's own fat it's going to taste like crap. �The ones onthe
    > pan in the picture below were done in a smoker but an oven will work.
    > Just not as good.
    >
    > http://i31.tinypic.com/u2177.jpg
    >
    > Here's what you'll get:
    >
    > http://i25.tinypic.com/2q80tmt.jpg


    Not bad, I like large meat loaf, five pounds of meat plus is what I
    use... to me one and two pond loaves are burgers. I agreee with you
    about the loaf pan, I bake mine in a roasting pan too... although
    there are many particular loafs that are traditionally intended to be
    dense and fat rich. But I can tell that you didn't grind your own
    meat, something weird about the texture, and looks compacted, probably
    over mixed. And what's all that red goopy coating? Naturally no one
    can know how anything tastes from a picture, if you like it that's all
    that matters. I don't think smoking meat loaf makes it better or
    worse, just a personal preference... I don't particularly like smoked
    beef and probably wouldn't like a smoked meat loaf, I doubt I'd want
    the flavor of my meat loaf over powered by smoke flavor.

  7. #7
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 08:42:22 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>I got the usual ingredients for meatloaf and wanted to put some onions
    >>in it as well. In the past adding onions seemed to give us heartburn
    >>for some reason so this time I decided to saute the onions before. I
    >>chopped an onion into small pieces and got it to the point of
    >>carmelization. Added a little crushed garlic too. Added all that to
    >>the other meatloaf ingredients and cooked as usual. It really added a
    >>nice flavor to the loaf.


    That reminded me of something that always turns out spectacular. No
    onions and the presentation nice.

    Pulpeta (Cuban Meat Loaf recipe)


    3/4 lb. ground beef
    1/4 lb. cooked ham (ground)
    4 eggs
    3 boiled eggs
    1/8 tsp. salt
    1/4 tsp pepper
    1 tsp oregano
    1 tsp cumin
    1 tbsp. minced garlic
    1/2 tsp minced garlic
    1 3/4 cups cracker meal
    20 olives w/ pimiento
    2 tbsp olive oil

    Mix the beef and ham together and add two beaten eggs, salt pepper,
    oregano, cumin, garlic and onion. Mix well, add enough cracker meal
    to make the meat hold its shape (3/4 a cup or so), and form the
    mixture into a large loaf.

    Open the loaf by cutting it across. Place the three hard boiled eggs
    down the center and line the olives on both sides of them. Close the
    loaf tightly, roll the loaf in the other two beaten eggs and then the
    cracker meal three times until all the cracker meal has been used. In
    a large skillet, brown the loaf in the heated oil. Its suggested that
    you try to brown the ends of the loaf first.


    After the loaf is browned, begin prepared the salsa (sauce). Pour the
    sauce over the loaf and simmer for about 45 minutes, turning it once
    or twice (or bake in an oven at 350 degrees). After the loaf is well
    done, remove from the heat and allow to cool before slicing.

    To make the sauce for the meat loaf, combine:

    1/2 tsp minced garlic
    1/4 tsp oregano
    1/4 tsp ground bay leaves
    2 tbsp tomato sauce
    1/2 cup white wine
    mix well

    meat loaf serves 4-6

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't care how you make the meat up if it's packed in a pan and
    > baked in it's own fat it's going to taste like crap. The ones on the
    > pan in the picture below were done in a smoker but an oven will work.
    > Just not as good.
    >
    > http://i31.tinypic.com/u2177.jpg
    >
    > Here's what you'll get:
    >
    > http://i25.tinypic.com/2q80tmt.jpg
    >
    > Lou


    Nice smoke ring!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama

  9. #9
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 13:07:33 -0800 (PST), Sheldon <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Nov 11, 3:11?pm, Lou Decruss <M...@notvalid.com> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 07:45:58 -0800 (PST), Sheldon <PENMAR...@aol.com>


    >>
    >> I don't care how you make the meat up if it's packed in a pan and
    >> baked in it's own fat it's going to taste like crap. ?The ones on the
    >> pan in the picture below were done in a smoker but an oven will work.
    >> Just not as good.
    >>
    >> http://i31.tinypic.com/u2177.jpg
    >>
    >> Here's what you'll get:
    >>
    >> http://i25.tinypic.com/2q80tmt.jpg

    >
    >Not bad, I like large meat loaf, five pounds of meat plus is what I
    >use... to me one and two pond loaves are burgers.


    I think those two weighed about 7-8 pounds total.

    > I agreee with you
    >about the loaf pan, I bake mine in a roasting pan too... although
    >there are many particular loafs that are traditionally intended to be
    >dense and fat rich.


    I've never seen a reason to make a meatloaf intentionally soaked in
    fat.

    >But I can tell that you didn't grind your own meat,


    Nope. I didn't. I got if from a real butcher not a grocery store.

    >something weird about the texture, and looks compacted,
    >probably over mixed.


    It was handled enough to mix and form.

    >And what's all that red goopy coating?


    Brown sugar, chili powder, and ketchup. And it's more brown from the
    brown sugar. The red is the smoke ring which you can see the contrast
    on the bottom where it sat on the pan slits. The topping was actually
    very thin and added about 30 minutes before the loaves were done.
    They take 3 - 3 1/2 hours.

    >Naturally no one can know how anything tastes from a picture,


    That smoke ring should give you a clue.

    >if you like it that's all that matters.


    >I don't think smoking meat loaf makes it better or
    >worse, just a personal preference...


    It seems the personal preference of everyone who's tried it prefers it
    smoked. Most people unfortunately don't have a smoker much less know
    how to use one. Do you have one?

    >I don't particularly like smoked
    >beef and probably wouldn't like a smoked meat loaf,


    There were lots of things I didn't think I'd like when I was a kid.
    But then I grew up.

    >I doubt I'd want the flavor of my meat loaf over powered by smoke flavor.


    Then stick with your method. My main point was to NOT use a loaf pan.

    Lou








  10. #10
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:43:16 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I don't care how you make the meat up if it's packed in a pan and
    >> baked in it's own fat it's going to taste like crap. The ones on the
    >> pan in the picture below were done in a smoker but an oven will work.
    >> Just not as good.
    >>
    >> http://i31.tinypic.com/u2177.jpg
    >>
    >> Here's what you'll get:
    >>
    >> http://i25.tinypic.com/2q80tmt.jpg
    >>
    >> Lou

    >
    >Nice smoke ring!


    Thanks OM. The first time I did one I was surprised how nice it was
    after such a short time.

    Lou

  11. #11
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    Lou Decruss wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    > >Lou Decruss wrote:
    > >> Sheldon wrote:

    >
    > >> I don't care how you make the meat up if it's packed in a pan and
    > >> baked in it's own fat it's going to taste like crap. ?The ones on the
    > >> pan in the picture below were done in a smoker but an oven will work.
    > >> Just not as good.

    >
    > >>http://i31.tinypic.com/u2177.jpg

    >
    > >> Here's what you'll get:

    >
    > >>http://i25.tinypic.com/2q80tmt.jpg

    >
    > >Not bad, I like large meat loaf, five pounds of meat plus is what I
    > >use... to me one and two pond loaves are burgers.

    >
    > I think those two weighed about 7-8 pounds total.
    >
    > > I agreee with you
    > >about the loaf pan, I bake mine in a roasting pan too... although
    > >there are many particular loafs that are traditionally intended to be
    > >dense and fat rich. �

    >
    > I've never seen a reason to make a meatloaf intentionally soaked in
    > fat.


    That's from lack of experience with foods.

    Most folks in the US don't make them but they're quite popular in
    Europe, many popular cold cuts (luncheon meats)
    are actually meat loaf, pate is meat loaf too... spiced ham and Spam
    are meat loaf... head cheese, and various
    liver/blood wursts are meat loaf... there are many others, many are
    cooked in a terrine.

    http://www.epicurious.com/tools/food.../entry?id=3851

    http://www.foodsubs.com/MeatcureCC.html

    > >But I can tell that you didn't grind your own meat,

    >
    > Nope. �I didn't. �I got if from a real butcher not a grocery store. �


    Everyone seems to give that very silly alibi for not owning a meat
    grinder, the fact that it's a "real" butcher shop is even more reason
    to mistrust the meat, "real" butchers are far more adept at screwing
    their patrons, and are more motivated as it's their shop/money...
    stupidmarkets are more honest because they do far more volume and they
    have no personal monetary stake as a shop owner would. But the ONLY
    way to get decent ground meat is to grind it yourself. As I said
    originally, it's NOT possible to make decent meat loaf if you don't
    own a meat grinder.

    > >And what's all that red goopy coating?

    >
    > Brown sugar, chili powder, and ketchup. �


    I don't like sweet sauce on meat loaf, not on ribs either, obviously
    many do. One of my favorite condiments for meat loaf is horseradish.

    > >Naturally no one can know how anything tastes from a picture,

    >
    > That smoke ring should give you a clue.


    Just signifies smoking, not that it tastes good.

    > >if you like it that's all that matters. �
    > >I don't think smoking meat loaf makes it better or
    > >worse, just a personal preference...

    >
    > It seems the personal preference of everyone who's tried it prefers it
    > smoked. �


    You keep defending, what's to defend, you must be unsure.

    From many years of experience cooking for guests I can attest to the
    fact that it's very rare a guest will make negative remarks to the
    host about the food served. Even most folks on a newsgroup haven't
    the spine to tell the truth about a dish that obviously sucks.

    So now post your recipe so I can tell you what I really think. <G>

    You need to buy a meat grinder, it's a far more important piece of
    cooking gear than a smoker. In fact any one who doesn't own a meat
    grinder is not worthy of claiming that they cook... if you don't grind
    your own meat then it's just fast food. I was able to tell
    immediately from the texture that your butcher sold you crap/scrap
    ground meat. If you enjoy ground meat dishes you MUST have a decent
    grinder<period>

  12. #12
    Scott Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    Sheldon wrote:

    >
    > So now post your recipe so I can tell you what I really think. <G>
    >


    Since you're in the mood of critiquing recipes and the so-called meat
    loaf (aka meatloaf) resident expert tell me what you think of this:

    Meat Loaf from Cook's Illustrated

    3 ounces Monterey Jack cheese , grated on small holes of box grater
    (about 1 cup)
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    1 medium onion , chopped fine (about 1 cup)
    1 medium rib celery , chopped fine (about 1/2 cup)
    1 medium clove garlic , minced or pressed through a garlic press (about
    1 teaspoon)
    2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme leaves
    1 teaspoon paprika
    1/4 cup tomato juice
    1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth
    2 large eggs
    1/2 teaspoon unflavored gelatin (powdered)
    1 tablespoon soy sauce
    1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    2/3 cup crushed saltine crackers
    2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves
    3/4 teaspoon table salt
    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1 pound ground sirloin
    1 pound ground beef chuck
    Glaze
    1/2 cup ketchup
    1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
    1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
    1/4 cup cider vinegar
    3 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
    Instructions

    1.

    1. Adjust oven rack to middle position; heat oven to 375 degrees.
    Spread cheese on plate and place in freezer until ready to use. Prepare
    baking sheet (see illustration below).
    2.

    2. Heat butter in 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat until
    foaming; add onion and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until
    beginning to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic, thyme, and paprika and
    cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Reduce heat to low and
    add tomato juice. Cook, stirring to scrape up browned bits from pan,
    until thickened, about 1 minute. Transfer mixture to small bowl and set
    aside to cool.
    3.

    3. Whisk broth and eggs in large bowl until combined. Sprinkle
    gelatin over liquid and let stand 5 minutes. Stir in soy sauce, mustard,
    saltines, parsley, salt, pepper, and onion mixture. Crumble frozen
    cheese into coarse powder and sprinkle over mixture. Add ground beef;
    mix gently with hands until thoroughly combined, about 1 minute.
    Transfer meat to foil rectangle and shape into 10 by 6-inch oval about 2
    inches high. Smooth top and edges of meat loaf with moistened spatula.
    Bake until an instant-read thermometer inserted into center of loaf
    reads 135 to 140 degrees, 55 to 65 minutes. Remove meat loaf from oven
    and turn on broiler.
    4.

    4. While meat loaf cooks, combine ingredients for glaze in small
    saucepan; bring to simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring, until
    thick and syrupy, about 5 minutes. Spread half of glaze evenly over
    cooked meat loaf with rubber spatula; place under broiler and cook until
    glaze bubbles and begins to brown at edges, about 5 minutes. Remove meat
    loaf from oven and spread evenly with remaining glaze; place back under
    broiler and cook until glaze is again bubbling and beginning to brown,
    about 5 minutes more. Let meat loaf cool about 20 minutes before slicing.

  13. #13
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Meatloaf

    On Nov 13, 11:28�am, Scott <sws2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > > So now post your recipe so I can tell you what I really think. <G>

    >
    > Since you're in the mood of critiquing recipes and the so-called meat
    > loaf (aka meatloaf)



    Meat loaf is two words.

    >resident expert tell me what you think of this:


    Pure crap... all those ingredients is more like chemistry class, and
    not nearly enough meat to make a loaf. That recipe is not salvageable
    so I won't critique it.



    > Meat Loaf from Cook's Illustrated
    >
    > 3 � � � ounces Monterey Jack cheese , grated on small holes of box grater
    > (about 1 cup)
    > 1 � � � tablespoon unsalted butter
    > 1 � � � medium onion , chopped fine (about 1 cup)
    > 1 � � � medium rib celery , chopped fine (about 1/2 cup)
    > 1 � � � medium clove garlic , minced or pressed through a garlic press (about
    > 1 teaspoon)
    > 2 � � � teaspoons minced fresh thyme leaves
    > 1 � � � teaspoon paprika
    > 1/4 � � cup tomato juice
    > 1/2 � � cup low-sodium chicken broth
    > 2 � � � large eggs
    > 1/2 � � teaspoon unflavored gelatin (powdered)
    > 1 � � � tablespoon soy sauce
    > 1 � � � teaspoon Dijon mustard
    > 2/3 � � cup crushed saltine crackers
    > 2 � � � tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves
    > 3/4 � � teaspoon table salt
    > 1/2 � � teaspoon ground black pepper
    > 1 � � � pound ground sirloin
    > 1 � � � pound ground beef chuck
    > Glaze
    > 1/2 � � cup ketchup
    > 1 � � � teaspoon hot pepper sauce
    > 1/2 � � teaspoon ground coriander
    > 1/4 � � cup cider vinegar
    > 3 � � � tablespoons packed light brown sugar
    > Instructions
    >
    > � � 1.
    >
    > � � � �1. Adjust oven rack to middle position; heat oven to 375 degrees.
    > Spread cheese on plate and place in freezer until ready to use. Prepare
    > baking sheet (see illustration below).
    > � � 2.
    >
    > � � � �2. Heat butter in 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat until
    > foaming; add onion and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until
    > beginning to brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic, thyme, and paprika and
    > cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Reduce heat to low and
    > add tomato juice. Cook, stirring to scrape up browned bits from pan,
    > until thickened, about 1 minute. Transfer mixture to small bowl and set
    > aside to cool.
    > � � 3.
    >
    > � � � �3. Whisk broth and eggs in large bowl until combined. Sprinkle
    > gelatin over liquid and let stand 5 minutes. Stir in soy sauce, mustard,
    > saltines, parsley, salt, pepper, and onion mixture. Crumble frozen
    > cheese into coarse powder and sprinkle over mixture. Add ground beef;
    > mix gently with hands until thoroughly combined, about 1 minute.
    > Transfer meat to foil rectangle and shape into 10 by 6-inch oval about 2
    > inches high. Smooth top and edges of meat loaf with moistened spatula.
    > Bake until an instant-read thermometer inserted into center of loaf
    > reads 135 to 140 degrees, 55 to 65 minutes. Remove meat loaf from oven
    > and turn on broiler.
    > � � 4.
    >
    > � � � �4. While meat loaf cooks, combine ingredients for glaze in small
    > saucepan; bring to simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring, until
    > thick and syrupy, about 5 minutes. Spread half of glaze evenly over
    > cooked meat loaf with rubber spatula; place under broiler and cook until
    > glaze bubbles and begins to brown at edges, about 5 minutes. Remove meat
    > loaf from oven and spread evenly with remaining glaze; place back under
    > broiler and cook until glaze is again bubbling and beginning to brown,
    > about 5 minutes more. Let meat loaf cool about 20 minutes before slicing.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32