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Thread: Meals (?) for today

  1. #1
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Meals (?) for today

    I haven't had a chance to shop yet, so had to make due with what I had, plus
    too tired to cook after work. I have saved all the posts and know you guys
    have recommended against the frozen meals for lunch but I didn't have
    anything else. Question: what's a normal number of cholesterol mg for the
    day if you have to cut down?

    No breakfast, but coffee with my usual sugar and half and half.
    Snack midmorning - about a cup of Honey Nut Cheerios, dry
    Lunch - Lean Cuisine Roasted Chicken with Green Beans (25 mg cholesterol)
    Dinner - handful of almonds and a flax seed oil capsule (need to remember to
    take that 3x per day)

    After work wind-down - 2 cocktails (rum and cranberry juice)

    I had my mind set on roasted veggies (only have frozen at the moment) with
    OO for dinner but didn't feel like cooking.

    LOL I'm going to starve. Ok, off to do my 1/2 hour on the treadmill.

    --
    Cheryl

    PS- CShenk and Sheldon, I read your posts in reply to Cholesterol Diet Ideas
    thread but haven't had a chance to reply yet. I love cabbage and that
    recipe looked good. CShenk, I will try to broaden my scope of healthy
    choices.


  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Cheryl wrote:
    >
    > Dinner - handful of almonds and a flax seed oil capsule (need to
    > remember to take that 3x per day)


    Very bad idea. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation
    is a key process in cardiovascular disease and other health
    problems. The following quotes from a USDA publication
    describe the inflammatory reaction which results from eating
    excess flaxseed and fish oils.

    Of all food animals, the pig is most similar to a human.
    Like humans it is by nature an omnivore, unlike cattle,
    goats, and sheep which are herbivores. The USDA publication
    _Atlas_of_Meat_Inspection_Pathology_ (USDA, 1972) is a
    guide for meat inspectors, not human nutrition. But here
    are some interesting comments on the effects of flaxseed
    oil consumption on pigs, quoting from pages 165-167:

    "Steatitis ('Yellow Fat' Disease) in Swine"

    "Definition.--Steatitus ('yellow fat' disease) in swine
    is a yellow pigmentation of adipose tissue associated
    with the use of fish products and flaxseed as feed."

    "Distribution and incidence.--Steatitus usually occurs
    near fisheries where cannery wastes are fed to swine.
    The disease is also found on fur ranches where the remains
    of mink feed containing fish products are consumed by pigs.
    The use of feed containing other substances possessing
    highly unsaturated fatty acids, such as flaxseed, will also
    produce the disease."

    "Feeding swine rations containing excessive amounts of
    highly unsaturated fatty acids and inadequate quantities of
    tocopherols causes porcine adipose tissue to contain a
    yellow, acid-fast pigment. The pigment consists of fat
    soluble and fat insoluble fractions and the latter possesses
    acid-fast staining characteristics. Fat cells can
    incorporate and stabilize unsaturated fatty acids as
    'storage fat' if vitamin E, an antioxidant, is added to a
    ration rich in unsaturated fatty acids."

    "The fat of affected swine has an odor of fish that can
    be accentuated by heating the tissue. Swine having steatitus
    tend to be thin and in poor physical condition."

    "Macroscopic appearance.--Subcutaneous and mesenteric
    fat, in particular, show the alterations characteristic
    of this dietary disease. Affected fat is slightly
    opaque and firmer than normal and varies from bright yellow
    to yellowish brown."

    "Microscopic appearance.--Foreign fat globules, some
    of which contain an acid-fast pigment, are deposited in
    the interstices of the adipose tissue. This deposition
    appears as fine droplets or, quite frequently, as larger
    discrete globules in groups or islets of variable size.
    At time the globules have a pericapillary and periarteriole
    location. Adipose cell tissues themselves are usually not
    affected. Occasionally, foreign fat globules are seen
    within adipose cells and their presence is interpreted to
    represent a permeation into the normal storage fat
    rather than a disturbed metabolic process. Foci of
    inflammation composed of collections of macrophages,
    neutrophils, eosinophils, and an occasional foreign-body
    giant cell may be present between the adipose cells. These
    macrophages and giant cells contain droplets of yellow fat.
    This inflammatory reaction is the basis for applying the
    name 'steatitus' to the condition."

  3. #3
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >>
    >> Dinner - handful of almonds and a flax seed oil capsule (need to
    >> remember to take that 3x per day)

    >
    > Very bad idea. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation
    > is a key process in cardiovascular disease and other health
    > problems. The following quotes from a USDA publication
    > describe the inflammatory reaction which results from eating
    > excess flaxseed and fish oils.
    >
    > Of all food animals, the pig is most similar to a human.
    > Like humans it is by nature an omnivore, unlike cattle,
    > goats, and sheep which are herbivores. The USDA publication
    > _Atlas_of_Meat_Inspection_Pathology_ (USDA, 1972) is a
    > guide for meat inspectors, not human nutrition. But here
    > are some interesting comments on the effects of flaxseed
    > oil consumption on pigs, quoting from pages 165-167:
    >
    > "Steatitis ('Yellow Fat' Disease) in Swine"
    >
    > "Definition.--Steatitus ('yellow fat' disease) in swine
    > is a yellow pigmentation of adipose tissue associated
    > with the use of fish products and flaxseed as feed."
    >
    > "Distribution and incidence.--Steatitus usually occurs
    > near fisheries where cannery wastes are fed to swine.
    > The disease is also found on fur ranches where the remains
    > of mink feed containing fish products are consumed by pigs.
    > The use of feed containing other substances possessing
    > highly unsaturated fatty acids, such as flaxseed, will also
    > produce the disease."
    >
    > "Feeding swine rations containing excessive amounts of
    > highly unsaturated fatty acids and inadequate quantities of
    > tocopherols causes porcine adipose tissue to contain a
    > yellow, acid-fast pigment. The pigment consists of fat
    > soluble and fat insoluble fractions and the latter possesses
    > acid-fast staining characteristics. Fat cells can
    > incorporate and stabilize unsaturated fatty acids as
    > 'storage fat' if vitamin E, an antioxidant, is added to a
    > ration rich in unsaturated fatty acids."
    >
    > "The fat of affected swine has an odor of fish that can
    > be accentuated by heating the tissue. Swine having steatitus
    > tend to be thin and in poor physical condition."
    >
    > "Macroscopic appearance.--Subcutaneous and mesenteric
    > fat, in particular, show the alterations characteristic
    > of this dietary disease. Affected fat is slightly
    > opaque and firmer than normal and varies from bright yellow
    > to yellowish brown."
    >
    > "Microscopic appearance.--Foreign fat globules, some
    > of which contain an acid-fast pigment, are deposited in
    > the interstices of the adipose tissue. This deposition
    > appears as fine droplets or, quite frequently, as larger
    > discrete globules in groups or islets of variable size.
    > At time the globules have a pericapillary and periarteriole
    > location. Adipose cell tissues themselves are usually not
    > affected. Occasionally, foreign fat globules are seen
    > within adipose cells and their presence is interpreted to
    > represent a permeation into the normal storage fat
    > rather than a disturbed metabolic process. Foci of
    > inflammation composed of collections of macrophages,
    > neutrophils, eosinophils, and an occasional foreign-body
    > giant cell may be present between the adipose cells. These
    > macrophages and giant cells contain droplets of yellow fat.
    > This inflammatory reaction is the basis for applying the
    > name 'steatitus' to the condition."


    Interesting, thanks Mark. My Dr recommended more Omega 3s and since Flax
    seed oil is what I have on-hand right now, that's what I thought I'd take.

    I might resemble a pig slightly from behind depending on the jeans I'm
    wearing at the time, though. But, I will talk to my Dr about your article.
    She's more into holistic and Western medicine, so she might be able to shed
    some light.

    Cheryl


  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Cheryl wrote:
    >
    > Interesting, thanks Mark. My Dr recommended more Omega 3s and since Flax
    > seed oil is what I have on-hand right now, that's what I thought I'd take.
    >
    > I might resemble a pig slightly from behind depending on the jeans I'm
    > wearing at the time, though. But, I will talk to my Dr about your article.
    > She's more into holistic and Western medicine, so she might be able to shed
    > some light.


    Ah, a quack! That explains it. Flaxseed oil has
    been very popular in the "alternative medicine"
    scene in recent years. The fear of inflammatory
    reactions, however, is more recent than the fad
    for flaxseed oil. She needs to catch up.

    You need a little omega-3 fatty acids, and if you
    eat a lot of fat, those flaxseed oil capsules might
    not shorten your life significantly. On the other
    hand, if you are eating a very low-fat diet and
    taking these capsules, you could be setting yourself
    up for steatitus and its inflammatory reactions.

    I eat a few walnuts now and then for the omega-3's,
    but I would never drink omega-3's or swallow capsules
    of them.

  5. #5
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today


    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote :
    >
    > I might resemble a pig slightly from behind depending on the jeans I'm
    > wearing at the time, though. But, I will talk to my Dr about your
    > article. She's more into holistic and Western medicine, so she might be
    > able to shed some light.
    >


    Do NOT listen to Mark Thorson! I'm telling you. Seriously.

    :




  6. #6
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > You need a little omega-3 fatty acids, and if you
    > eat a lot of fat, those flaxseed oil capsules might
    > not shorten your life significantly. On the other
    > hand, if you are eating a very low-fat diet and
    > taking these capsules, you could be setting yourself
    > up for steatitus and its inflammatory reactions.
    >



    What is steatitus?

    gloria p

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    On Mon, 6 Oct 2008 21:50:58 -0400, "Cheryl"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >CShenk, I will try to broaden my scope of healthy choices.


    My son ground up some chicken breasts and sautéed it with garlic and
    multicolored peppers. The sauce included hot chili oil, not much else
    and it was served over rice. Simple, but really good.

    Last night - I cut up one chicken breast into tiny pieces, sautéed it
    with copious garlic in EVOO, added caramelized onions, musgovian fresh
    mushrooms, green zucchini, (yellow) crookneck squash and cooked them
    until tender crisp. Deglazed the pan with a couple of tablespoons of
    white wine and added a squirt of ketchup because I wanted some tomato
    flavor, but didn't have fresh and didn't want to open a can of paste.
    I wanted to add fresh basil, but didn't have any. All of that was
    mixed with whole wheat linguini and some pasta water to loosen it up.
    It was very good!

    Not sure how those meals did on the cholesterol scale, but they passed
    the hubby test. He's cutting down on everything (for his heart and
    cholesterol). I'd go nuts if he had diabetes too. We've got fish,
    chicken and vegetables. What's left to eat?



    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    On Mon, 06 Oct 2008 20:21:19 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ah, a quack! That explains it. Flaxseed oil has
    >been very popular in the "alternative medicine"
    >scene in recent years. The fear of inflammatory
    >reactions, however, is more recent than the fad
    >for flaxseed oil. She needs to catch up.


    Mark, what are your credentials for making that call?


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  9. #9
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Cheryl wrote:
    > "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Cheryl wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Dinner - handful of almonds and a flax seed oil capsule (need to
    >>> remember to take that 3x per day)

    >>
    >> Very bad idea. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation
    >> is a key process in cardiovascular disease and other health
    >> problems. The following quotes from a USDA publication
    >> describe the inflammatory reaction which results from eating
    >> excess flaxseed and fish oils.
    >>

    >
    > Interesting, thanks Mark. My Dr recommended more Omega 3s and since
    > Flax seed oil is what I have on-hand right now, that's what I thought
    > I'd take.
    > I might resemble a pig slightly from behind depending on the jeans I'm
    > wearing at the time, though. But, I will talk to my Dr about your
    > article. She's more into holistic and Western medicine, so she might
    > be able to shed some light.
    >
    > Cheryl



    Mark is the resident doomsayer. He actually thinks we have mad cow disease
    in the U.S. Yep, talk to your doctor.

    Jill


  10. #10
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    said...

    > Not sure how those meals did on the cholesterol scale, but they passed
    > the hubby test. He's cutting down on everything (for his heart and
    > cholesterol). I'd go nuts if he had diabetes too. We've got fish,
    > chicken and vegetables. What's left to eat?



    Pork tenderloin


  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >> Dinner - handful of almonds and a flax seed oil capsule (need to
    >> remember to take that 3x per day)

    >
    > Very bad idea. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation
    > is a key process in cardiovascular disease and other health
    > problems. The following quotes from a USDA publication
    > describe the inflammatory reaction which results from eating
    > excess flaxseed and fish oils.
    >
    > Of all food animals, the pig is most similar to a human.
    > Like humans it is by nature an omnivore, unlike cattle,
    > goats, and sheep which are herbivores. The USDA publication
    > _Atlas_of_Meat_Inspection_Pathology_ (USDA, 1972) is a
    > guide for meat inspectors, not human nutrition. But here
    > are some interesting comments on the effects of flaxseed
    > oil consumption on pigs, quoting from pages 165-167:
    >
    > "Steatitis ('Yellow Fat' Disease) in Swine"
    >
    > "Definition.--Steatitus ('yellow fat' disease) in swine
    > is a yellow pigmentation of adipose tissue associated
    > with the use of fish products and flaxseed as feed."
    >
    > "Distribution and incidence.--Steatitus usually occurs
    > near fisheries where cannery wastes are fed to swine.
    > The disease is also found on fur ranches where the remains
    > of mink feed containing fish products are consumed by pigs.
    > The use of feed containing other substances possessing
    > highly unsaturated fatty acids, such as flaxseed, will also
    > produce the disease."
    >
    > "Feeding swine rations containing excessive amounts of
    > highly unsaturated fatty acids and inadequate quantities of
    > tocopherols causes porcine adipose tissue to contain a
    > yellow, acid-fast pigment. The pigment consists of fat
    > soluble and fat insoluble fractions and the latter possesses
    > acid-fast staining characteristics. Fat cells can
    > incorporate and stabilize unsaturated fatty acids as
    > 'storage fat' if vitamin E, an antioxidant, is added to a
    > ration rich in unsaturated fatty acids."
    >
    > "The fat of affected swine has an odor of fish that can
    > be accentuated by heating the tissue. Swine having steatitus
    > tend to be thin and in poor physical condition."
    >
    > "Macroscopic appearance.--Subcutaneous and mesenteric
    > fat, in particular, show the alterations characteristic
    > of this dietary disease. Affected fat is slightly
    > opaque and firmer than normal and varies from bright yellow
    > to yellowish brown."
    >
    > "Microscopic appearance.--Foreign fat globules, some
    > of which contain an acid-fast pigment, are deposited in
    > the interstices of the adipose tissue. This deposition
    > appears as fine droplets or, quite frequently, as larger
    > discrete globules in groups or islets of variable size.
    > At time the globules have a pericapillary and periarteriole
    > location. Adipose cell tissues themselves are usually not
    > affected. Occasionally, foreign fat globules are seen
    > within adipose cells and their presence is interpreted to
    > represent a permeation into the normal storage fat
    > rather than a disturbed metabolic process. Foci of
    > inflammation composed of collections of macrophages,
    > neutrophils, eosinophils, and an occasional foreign-body
    > giant cell may be present between the adipose cells. These
    > macrophages and giant cells contain droplets of yellow fat.
    > This inflammatory reaction is the basis for applying the
    > name 'steatitus' to the condition."


    Really! So what is "excessive", I wonder?

    --
    Jean B.

  12. #12
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    jmcquown wrote:
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >> "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> Cheryl wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Dinner - handful of almonds and a flax seed oil capsule (need to
    >>>> remember to take that 3x per day)
    >>>
    >>> Very bad idea. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation
    >>> is a key process in cardiovascular disease and other health
    >>> problems. The following quotes from a USDA publication
    >>> describe the inflammatory reaction which results from eating
    >>> excess flaxseed and fish oils.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Interesting, thanks Mark. My Dr recommended more Omega 3s and since
    >> Flax seed oil is what I have on-hand right now, that's what I thought
    >> I'd take.
    >> I might resemble a pig slightly from behind depending on the jeans I'm
    >> wearing at the time, though. But, I will talk to my Dr about your
    >> article. She's more into holistic and Western medicine, so she might
    >> be able to shed some light.
    >>
    >> Cheryl

    >
    >
    > Mark is the resident doomsayer. He actually thinks we have mad cow
    > disease in the U.S. Yep, talk to your doctor.
    >
    > Jill


    Sure, talk to your doctor.

    OTOH, how good a job has the FDA done in protecting the US consumer?

    Are folks and cattle in the US miraculously immune to this issue?

    --
    Jean B.

  13. #13
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Gloria P wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > > You need a little omega-3 fatty acids, and if you
    > > eat a lot of fat, those flaxseed oil capsules might
    > > not shorten your life significantly. On the other
    > > hand, if you are eating a very low-fat diet and
    > > taking these capsules, you could be setting yourself
    > > up for steatitus and its inflammatory reactions.

    >
    > What is steatitus?


    Yellow fat disease, an inflammatory reaction caused
    by having excess flaxseed or fish oil in the diet.

  14. #14
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    sf wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 06 Oct 2008 20:21:19 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Ah, a quack! That explains it. Flaxseed oil has
    > >been very popular in the "alternative medicine"
    > >scene in recent years. The fear of inflammatory
    > >reactions, however, is more recent than the fad
    > >for flaxseed oil. She needs to catch up.

    >
    > Mark, what are your credentials for making that call?


    You don't need to trust me, because I quote primary
    sources and provide bibliographic references if anyone
    wants to track them down to verify the accuracy of my
    quotes.

  15. #15
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    "sf" wrote in message news:cqmle4dajggctdaouc9396lfbg[email protected]..

    > My son ground up some chicken breasts and sautéed it with garlic and
    > multicolored peppers. The sauce included hot chili oil, not much else
    > and it was served over rice. Simple, but really good.
    >
    > Last night - I cut up one chicken breast into tiny pieces, sautéed it
    > with copious garlic in EVOO, added caramelized onions, musgovian fresh
    > mushrooms, green zucchini, (yellow) crookneck squash and cooked them
    > until tender crisp. Deglazed the pan with a couple of tablespoons of
    > white wine and added a squirt of ketchup because I wanted some tomato
    > flavor, but didn't have fresh and didn't want to open a can of paste.
    > I wanted to add fresh basil, but didn't have any. All of that was
    > mixed with whole wheat linguini and some pasta water to loosen it up.
    > It was very good!
    >
    > Not sure how those meals did on the cholesterol scale, but they passed
    > the hubby test. He's cutting down on everything (for his heart and
    > cholesterol). I'd go nuts if he had diabetes too. We've got fish,
    > chicken and vegetables. What's left to eat?


    Sounds good to me! Tonight I caramelized some thick onion pieces with
    garlic in EVOO. Poured the cooked onions and garlic with the EVOO over some
    broccoli and roasted them. Cooked some bread to go with (my only downfall
    today but not much saturated fat and no cholesterol) and dipped the bread in
    the leftover EVOO from the roasted veggies. No butter, no meat, and for
    today I could deal with that. No cheese in several days. Wow, I miss it.
    Can you "save up" to have some? lol

    Can you get tomato paste in the tube? It's easier to store and lasts
    longer.

    Cheryl


  16. #16
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today


    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Sounds good to me! Tonight I caramelized some thick onion pieces with
    > garlic in EVOO. Poured the cooked onions and garlic with the EVOO over
    > some broccoli and roasted them. Cooked some bread to go with (my only
    > downfall today but not much saturated fat and no cholesterol) and dipped
    > the bread in the leftover EVOO from the roasted veggies. No butter, no
    > meat, and for today I could deal with that.


    Sounds really good. Sauteed onions are so delicious, they add a YUM factor
    but are healthy.

    No cheese in several days. Wow, I miss it.
    > Can you "save up" to have some? lol


    Don't tell yourself that you CAN'T have *anything.* That's the best way to
    drive yourself to it! Just have some, in moderation, when you crave it and
    subs won't work.

    I checked my Sour Cream dip (made with Daisy Light SC) and it has 10 mgs of
    cholesterol in 2 tablespoons. Not bad if it gets heaps of good fiber into
    you, int he way of raw or lightly steamed vegetables. You don't like peppers
    or cukes, but how about raw or lightly steamed broc, carrots, or celery?




  17. #17
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today



    Gloria P wrote:
    >
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > > You need a little omega-3 fatty acids, and if you
    > > eat a lot of fat, those flaxseed oil capsules might
    > > not shorten your life significantly. On the other
    > > hand, if you are eating a very low-fat diet and
    > > taking these capsules, you could be setting yourself
    > > up for steatitus and its inflammatory reactions.
    > >

    >
    > What is steatitus?
    >
    > gloria p


    Steatitis is inflammation of body fat with deposition of waxy material
    between fat cells.

  18. #18
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > Gloria P wrote:


    >> What is steatitus?
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > Steatitis is inflammation of body fat with deposition of waxy material
    > between fat cells.


    ....and exactly how common is this?? I'd never heard of it.

  19. #19
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > Gloria P wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>
    >>> You need a little omega-3 fatty acids, and if you
    >>> eat a lot of fat, those flaxseed oil capsules might
    >>> not shorten your life significantly. On the other
    >>> hand, if you are eating a very low-fat diet and
    >>> taking these capsules, you could be setting yourself
    >>> up for steatitus and its inflammatory reactions.
    >>>

    >> What is steatitus?
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > Steatitis is inflammation of body fat with deposition of waxy material
    > between fat cells.



    Interesting. Is this a real medical condition or something dreamed up
    by health food stores?

    The reason I ask: I searched the name on three medical websites* and
    none of them could identify the word.

    *Mayo CLinic, WebMD and Merck

    gloria p

  20. #20
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Meals (?) for today

    Goomba wrote:
    >
    > Arri London wrote:
    > >
    > > Steatitis is inflammation of body fat with deposition of waxy material
    > > between fat cells.

    >
    > ...and exactly how common is this?? I'd never heard of it.


    I don't think the incidence is known. It's a chronic
    condition of poor health, not something quickly lethal.
    Any deaths from steatitus are probably ascribed to
    other causes, such as failure of an afflicted organ.

    It's sort of like being fat. A death certificate
    would say something like "heart failure", not "fat".

    Before flaxseed and flaxseed oil became dubious "health"
    fads, there probably was very little steatitus in
    humans. I think in 20 years, the adverse effects of
    eating flaxseed and flaxseed oil may become evident
    in retrospect.

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