Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 68

Thread: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better half
    swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    get dinner on the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    course, and they are ready to push through the ricer in about 10
    minutes. The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    counting the peeling time.

    Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the skin on
    - that's a whole other story.

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    [email protected] wrote on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    (PST):

    > Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better
    > half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    > to the time to get dinner on the table. I like to just
    > quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    > through the ricer in about 10 minutes. The whole skin-on
    > method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.


    > Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the
    > skin on - that's a whole other story.


    Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  3. #3
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    >(PST):
    >
    >> Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better
    >> half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    >> to the time to get dinner on the table. I like to just
    >> quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    >> through the ricer in about 10 minutes. The whole skin-on
    >> method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.

    >
    >> Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the
    >> skin on - that's a whole other story.

    >
    >Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.


    Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. I'd way rather pare
    a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.

    I could see where this *might* make a difference to taste, because
    potatoes boiled in the skin would be less likely to absorb water, but
    I can't see it as a huge issue relative to the time issue if they're
    not overcooked.

    Nina


  4. #4
    Pits09 Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Jan 13, 11:40*pm, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    > On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    >
    > <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    > > tweeny90...@mypacks.net *wrote *on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    > >(PST):

    >
    > >> Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? *My better
    > >> half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    > >> to the time to get dinner on *the table. I like to just
    > >> quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    > >> through the ricer *in about 10 minutes. *The whole skin-on
    > >> method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.

    >
    > >> *Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about *mashing and eating *them with the
    > >> skin on - that's a whole other story.

    >
    > >Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.

    >
    > Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. *I'd way rather pare
    > a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.
    >
    > I could see where this *might* make a difference to taste, because
    > potatoes boiled in the skin would be less likely to absorb water, but
    > I can't see it as a huge issue relative to the time issue if they're
    > not overcooked.
    >
    > Nina


    From a quick Google

    " Potato skins store many nutrients and also contain a lot of fiber
    which is essential for a healthy diet. Leaving the potato skins on the
    potato also helps contain the nutrients in the flesh of the potato
    which has a tendency to escape during cooking. Based on a 2000 calorie
    diet, a large baked potato, including the skin, has 278 calories. Only
    3 of these calories are from fat. The baked potato contains only 1% of
    the fat allowance considered as part of a healthy diet, with 0% of
    this being saturated fat.

    The potato, as well as the potato skin, is a great source of vitamin
    C, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, manganese, and dietary fiber.
    Potatoes and potato skins contain 18% of the recommended daily
    allowance of iron and 7.5 grams of protein which is rarely found in
    vegetables in such high concentrations. Potato skins also contain a
    variety of phytonutrients which are a natural source of antioxidants
    that help to prevent cellular deterioration of the body. The
    phytonutrients found in the potato skins as well as the flesh include
    carotenoids, flavonoids, and caffeic acid. "

  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    "Nina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    >> (PST):
    >>
    >>> Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better
    >>> half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    >>> to the time to get dinner on the table. I like to just
    >>> quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    >>> through the ricer in about 10 minutes. The whole skin-on
    >>> method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.

    >>
    >>> Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the
    >>> skin on - that's a whole other story.

    >>
    >> Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.

    >
    > Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. I'd way rather pare
    > a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.
    >

    I peel under running cold water or wear gloves.
    --
    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland


  6. #6
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better half
    > swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    > get dinner on the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    > course, and they are ready to push through the ricer in about 10
    > minutes. The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    > counting the peeling time.


    If nothing else, I like my potatoes mashed while they are still
    hot. Even 10 minutes sounds like a long enough time, never
    mind a half hour plus. And peeling hot potatoes doesn't sound
    like a lot of fun, either.

    I vote that the better half deals with the hot unpeeled potatoes
    and gets the mashed potatoes on the table.

    nancy

  7. #7
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    Pits09 wrote:

    > On Jan 13, 11:40 pm, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    >>
    >><not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    >>
    >>>tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    >>>(PST):

    >>
    >>>>Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better
    >>>>half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    >>>>to the time to get dinner on the table. I like to just
    >>>>quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    >>>>through the ricer in about 10 minutes. The whole skin-on
    >>>>method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.

    >>
    >>>> Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the
    >>>>skin on - that's a whole other story.

    >>
    >>>Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.

    >>
    >>Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. I'd way rather pare
    >>a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.
    >>
    >>I could see where this *might* make a difference to taste, because
    >>potatoes boiled in the skin would be less likely to absorb water, but
    >>I can't see it as a huge issue relative to the time issue if they're
    >>not overcooked.
    >>
    >>Nina

    >
    >
    > From a quick Google
    >
    > " Potato skins store many nutrients and also contain a lot of fiber
    > which is essential for a healthy diet. Leaving the potato skins on the
    > potato also helps contain the nutrients in the flesh of the potato
    > which has a tendency to escape during cooking. Based on a 2000 calorie
    > diet, a large baked potato, including the skin, has 278 calories. Only
    > 3 of these calories are from fat. The baked potato contains only 1% of
    > the fat allowance considered as part of a healthy diet, with 0% of
    > this being saturated fat.
    >
    > The potato, as well as the potato skin, is a great source of vitamin
    > C, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, manganese, and dietary fiber.
    > Potatoes and potato skins contain 18% of the recommended daily
    > allowance of iron and 7.5 grams of protein which is rarely found in
    > vegetables in such high concentrations. Potato skins also contain a
    > variety of phytonutrients which are a natural source of antioxidants
    > that help to prevent cellular deterioration of the body. The
    > phytonutrients found in the potato skins as well as the flesh include
    > carotenoids, flavonoids, and caffeic acid. "


    And besides, some of us think the skin is the best part.


  8. #8
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better half
    > swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    > get dinner on the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    > course, and they are ready to push through the ricer in about 10
    > minutes. The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    > counting the peeling time.
    >
    > Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the skin on
    > - that's a whole other story.


    I boil them with the skins on for potato salad, because I've noticed that
    the kind I prefer, Yukon Gold, seems to retain more color and flavor that
    way. But I peel them for mashed potatoes w/o skins, probably out of sheer
    habit.

    Something else that I do out of habit--because it's what my mother did--is
    peel a strip around the potato before boiling it with the skin on. It makes
    the skins lift off more easily afterwards. Perhaps you could use that method
    as a compromise on the peel/no peel issue.



  9. #9
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Jan 13, 8:23*am, tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    > Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? *My better half
    > swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    > get dinner on *the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    > course, and they are ready to push through the ricer *in about 10
    > minutes. *The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    > counting the peeling time.
    >
    > *Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about *mashing and eating *them with the skinon
    > - that's a whole other story.


    ============================
    Peel 'em first. Cold water to cover with a spoonful of salt and a
    couple of cloves of whole peeled garlic. Cook & drain (leave the
    garlic in there. It will be very soft.. While still hot, beat with
    portable mixer adding (real) butter and whole milk or cream. Keep
    warm.
    When I'm cooking for a crowd (50+/-), I do several 4 to 6 quart dutch
    ovens instead of gigantic pots because my arms are too shortto handle
    a mixer in a 16+ quart kettle.

    Lynn in Fargo
    NEVER serve instant mashed "potatoes" to ANYBODY!

  10. #10
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better half
    > swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    > get dinner on the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    > course, and they are ready to push through the ricer in about 10
    > minutes. The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    > counting the peeling time.
    >
    > Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the skin on
    > - that's a whole other story.


    For a nice looking mashed, we peel, then cook and mash. Often we like to
    just leave the skin on and mash with the skin for a more rustic and
    flavorful dish. We look over the potato and peel away anything that does
    not look so good, of course.

    When my wife makes potato salad she leaves the skin on then peels them while
    still hot.



  11. #11
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 09:01:57 -0600, Kathleen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Pits09 wrote:
    >
    >> On Jan 13, 11:40 pm, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    >>>
    >>><not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    >>>>(PST):
    >>>
    >>>>>Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better
    >>>>>half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    >>>>>to the time to get dinner on the table. I like to just
    >>>>>quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    >>>>>through the ricer in about 10 minutes. The whole skin-on
    >>>>>method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.
    >>>
    >>>>> Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the
    >>>>>skin on - that's a whole other story.
    >>>
    >>>>Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.
    >>>
    >>>Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. I'd way rather pare
    >>>a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.
    >>>
    >>>I could see where this *might* make a difference to taste, because
    >>>potatoes boiled in the skin would be less likely to absorb water, but
    >>>I can't see it as a huge issue relative to the time issue if they're
    >>>not overcooked.
    >>>
    >>>Nina

    >>
    >>
    >> From a quick Google
    >>
    >> " Potato skins store many nutrients and also contain a lot of fiber
    >> which is essential for a healthy diet. Leaving the potato skins on the
    >> potato also helps contain the nutrients in the flesh of the potato
    >> which has a tendency to escape during cooking. Based on a 2000 calorie
    >> diet, a large baked potato, including the skin, has 278 calories. Only
    >> 3 of these calories are from fat. The baked potato contains only 1% of
    >> the fat allowance considered as part of a healthy diet, with 0% of
    >> this being saturated fat.
    >>
    >> The potato, as well as the potato skin, is a great source of vitamin
    >> C, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, manganese, and dietary fiber.
    >> Potatoes and potato skins contain 18% of the recommended daily
    >> allowance of iron and 7.5 grams of protein which is rarely found in
    >> vegetables in such high concentrations. Potato skins also contain a
    >> variety of phytonutrients which are a natural source of antioxidants
    >> that help to prevent cellular deterioration of the body. The
    >> phytonutrients found in the potato skins as well as the flesh include
    >> carotenoids, flavonoids, and caffeic acid. "

    >
    >And besides, some of us think the skin is the best part.


    Oh, me too, but there are a lot of people who don't like skins in
    their mashed potatoes, which was really the question.

    Nina


  12. #12
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    > On Jan 13, 8:23 am, tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    >
    >>Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better half
    >>swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    >>get dinner on the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    >>course, and they are ready to push through the ricer in about 10
    >>minutes. The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    >>counting the peeling time.
    >>
    >> Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about mashing and eating them with the skin on
    >>- that's a whole other story.

    >
    >
    > ============================
    > Peel 'em first. Cold water to cover with a spoonful of salt and a
    > couple of cloves of whole peeled garlic. Cook & drain (leave the
    > garlic in there. It will be very soft.. While still hot, beat with
    > portable mixer adding (real) butter and whole milk or cream. Keep
    > warm.

    <snip>

    I scrub whole small red potatoes and put them in a pan with cold water
    to cover, salt and a couple cloves of garlic.

    Heat some sour cream, butter, pepper (preferably white) and salt in the
    microwave (having this stuff already hot prevents cooling of small
    batches of potatoes).

    Boil 'til fork tender, drain, return potatoes in the pan to the burner
    and shake the pan around, tossing the potatoes to drive off excess
    moisture. When the billows of steam start to subside, remove from heat.
    This step helps prevent glue-y potatoes.

    Add butter and sour cream mixture and beat with a portable mixer. If
    you've got some fresh chives handy to mince up, they make a nice
    garnish. Otherwise, serve up as is.

    > Lynn in Fargo
    > NEVER serve instant mashed "potatoes" to ANYBODY!


    That's all my mother ever served. I grew up convinced that mashed
    potatoes were disgusting.


  13. #13
    TammyM Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?


    "Nina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 09:01:57 -0600, Kathleen
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>And besides, some of us think the skin is the best part.

    >
    > Oh, me too, but there are a lot of people who don't like skins in
    > their mashed potatoes, which was really the question.


    My beloved, late mother-in-law always mashed her potatoes with skins on. I
    loved them and still do it that way when preparing them for anyone other
    than my extended family who like their lily white, unadulterated mashed
    tatoes.

    TammyM



  14. #14
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    In article <YR1bl.193449$[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? My better half
    > > swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds to the time to
    > > get dinner on the table. I like to just quarter them, peeled of
    > > course, and they are ready to push through the ricer in about 10
    > > minutes. The whole skin-on method takes over a half hour, not
    > > counting the peeling time.

    >
    > If nothing else, I like my potatoes mashed while they are still
    > hot. Even 10 minutes sounds like a long enough time, never
    > mind a half hour plus. And peeling hot potatoes doesn't sound
    > like a lot of fun, either.
    >
    > I vote that the better half deals with the hot unpeeled potatoes
    > and gets the mashed potatoes on the table.


    How about leave the peels on, quarter them, cook them and peel
    afterwards? I think they are easier to peel that way.

    I like the peels, though.

    In fact, I'd rather they didn't get smashed at all. Boiled potatoes are
    one of my favorite ways to cook them.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  15. #15
    Mitch@_._ Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 08:23:30 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Peel 'em first. Cold water to cover



    That's interesting. I've always put them into boiling water.
    About how long does it take them to cook after the water comes to a
    boil?

  16. #16
    twee[email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Jan 13, 9:40*am, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    > On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    >
    > <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    > > tweeny90...@mypacks.net *wrote *on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    > >(PST):

    >
    > >> Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? *My better
    > >> half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    > >> to the time to get dinner on *the table. I like to just
    > >> quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    > >> through the ricer *in about 10 minutes. *The whole skin-on
    > >> method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.

    >
    > >> *Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about *mashing and eating *them with the
    > >> skin on - that's a whole other story.

    >
    > >Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.

    >
    > Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. *I'd way rather pare
    > a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.
    >
    > I could see where this *might* make a difference to taste, because
    > potatoes boiled in the skin would be less likely to absorb water, but
    > I can't see it as a huge issue relative to the time issue if they're
    > not overcooked.
    >
    > Nina


    I think I'll run a 'taste test' - two spuds from the same lot, one
    peeled first and one peeled after boiling. Let other half be the
    taste judge and then I'll know the way to go when I want mashed.

  17. #17
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Jan 13, 11:49*am, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:

    > >And besides, some of us think the skin is the best part.

    >
    > Oh, me too, but there are a lot of people who don't like skins in
    > their mashed potatoes, which was really the question.
    >
    > Nina


    No -the question was if you peeled before or after boiling. No WAY do
    we like skins in our mashed potatoes.

  18. #18
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Jan 13, 9:49*am, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net>


    > I vote that the better half deals with the hot unpeeled potatoes
    > and gets the mashed potatoes on the table.


    Yeah - put the b.h. to WORK. I like your answer.


  19. #19
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 09:40:26 -0800 (PST), [email protected]
    wrote:

    >On Jan 13, 11:49*am, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    >
    >> >And besides, some of us think the skin is the best part.

    >>
    >> Oh, me too, but there are a lot of people who don't like skins in
    >> their mashed potatoes, which was really the question.
    >>
    >> Nina

    >
    >No -the question was if you peeled before or after boiling. No WAY do
    >we like skins in our mashed potatoes.


    Oh, that's what I meant... that the question was about WHEN to peel
    the potatoes, not IF you were going to peel the potatoes.

    Nina


  20. #20
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Mashed potatoes - peeled or not before boiling?

    On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 09:38:57 -0800 (PST), [email protected]
    wrote:

    >On Jan 13, 9:40*am, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 13 Jan 2009 14:28:24 GMT, "James Silverton"
    >>
    >> <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not> wrote:
    >> > tweeny90...@mypacks.net *wrote *on Tue, 13 Jan 2009 06:23:21 -0800
    >> >(PST):

    >>
    >> >> Do you boil the whole potato with skin still on? *My better
    >> >> half swears this matters tastewise, but for me, it just adds
    >> >> to the time to get dinner on *the table. I like to just
    >> >> quarter them, peeled of course, and they are ready to push
    >> >> through the ricer *in about 10 minutes. *The whole skin-on
    >> >> method takes over a half hour, not counting the peeling time.

    >>
    >> >> *Now, I'm NOT tawkin' about *mashing and eating *them with the
    >> >> skin on - that's a whole other story.

    >>
    >> >Peeling is much easier if done after boiling of whole potatoes.

    >>
    >> Wow, that would certainly be a matter of opinion. *I'd way rather pare
    >> a cold potato than to try to take the skin off a hot one.
    >>
    >> I could see where this *might* make a difference to taste, because
    >> potatoes boiled in the skin would be less likely to absorb water, but
    >> I can't see it as a huge issue relative to the time issue if they're
    >> not overcooked.
    >>
    >> Nina

    >
    >I think I'll run a 'taste test' - two spuds from the same lot, one
    >peeled first and one peeled after boiling. Let other half be the
    >taste judge and then I'll know the way to go when I want mashed.


    Be sure to do it blind. :-)

    And report back!


Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32