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Thread: Mash potatoes

  1. #1
    James Guest

    Default Mash potatoes

    I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    than pelling before cooking.

    So far I just mash and add butter.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    James <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    > off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    > than pelling before cooking.
    >
    > So far I just mash and add butter.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    There are a million and one recipes for spuds.
    Have you googled for that yet?
    --
    Peace! Om

    I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

  3. #3
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 17:44:21 -0800 (PST), James <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >than pelling before cooking.
    >
    >So far I just mash and add butter.
    >
    >Any suggestions?


    I made some last night with milk, sour cream, butter, salt, and white
    pepper. They were fabulous! I'm currently re-heating the leftovers
    in the oven, with cheddar cheese on top.

    Carol

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  4. #4
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 19:45:33 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article
    ><[email protected]>,
    > James <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >> off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >> than pelling before cooking.
    >>
    >> So far I just mash and add butter.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?

    >
    >There are a million and one recipes for spuds.
    >Have you googled for that yet?


    Roasted garlic mashed with the taters can be good, especially if you
    cream them up with -- erm -- cream.

    I like my mashed spuds with a little horseradish sometimes, but you
    don't want to add horseradish if they're too hot because the allyl
    isothoicyanate (the hot stuff in horseradish) is so volatile it'll
    oxidize and/or dissipate before it has a chance to make the spuds glow
    in that yummy horseradish manner if they're too hot when you mix them
    in.

    The same goes for wasabi, which has spiked mashers in my house on
    occasion. The kick comes from the same volatile chemical.

    Bacon crumbled on top of regular mashers or horseradish spuds would
    please me, at least.

    Getting them creamy and adding minced green onion and butter and
    baking it all in a casserole with some good cheese on top would be
    good, too. As would mashing gorgonzola and green onions into the
    taters.

    Once, when I had some leftover mashers, I made patties out of them,
    put a dollop of sauteed minced mushrooms on the patties, formed the
    patties into little mushroom-filled balls, rolled tater balls in panko
    crumbs and fried them golden brown. I thought I'd made it up, but was
    told here on rfc that I'd approximated some sort of Russian potato
    fried ball thingy I'd never heard of.

    The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is
    done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the
    sun.

    Except when there is.

    Strong aromatics do nice things with mashed potatoes since the spuds
    offer a mostly bland palette upon which you can compose a flavor
    profile. The softness of the mashed potato texture invites
    contrasting textures (crunchy, for example, as with fried bacon and/or
    raw green onion -- two different ways of being crunchy). So I'd
    hazard that mashed potatoes with butter and cream dolloped Belgian
    endive leaves would taste right fine and offer a pleasing contrast of
    textures. Add some bacon crumbles or blue cheese, and you further
    develop the interaction of textures and flavors.

    Or do the above (sans bacon and blue cheese) and sprinkle with
    parmisano-reggiano and broil for a few moments till the cheese browns
    and the leaves begin to heat through.

    Now I'm wondering about frying up some minced andouille and mixing it
    with mashed spuds in a bitter herb wrapper like radicchio. And what
    about lemon juice and herbs de Provence with butter?

    Don't forget salt and pepper.
    --

    modom

  5. #5
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    James wrote:
    > I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    > off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    > than pelling before cooking.
    >
    > So far I just mash and add butter.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed
    potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south-Texas

  6. #6
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >James wrote:
    >> I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >> off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >> than pelling before cooking.
    >>
    >> So far I just mash and add butter.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?

    >
    >Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed
    >potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.


    Do they make those in an electric version yet? They must! I have too
    many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

    Carol

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    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  7. #7
    ..PL.. Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    "modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 19:45:33 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>In article
    >><[email protected]>,
    >> James <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >>> off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >>> than pelling before cooking.
    >>>
    >>> So far I just mash and add butter.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions?

    >>
    >>There are a million and one recipes for spuds.
    >>Have you googled for that yet?

    >
    > Roasted garlic mashed with the taters can be good, especially if you
    > cream them up with -- erm -- cream.



    My favourite!!


    >
    > I like my mashed spuds with a little horseradish sometimes, but you
    > don't want to add horseradish if they're too hot because the allyl
    > isothoicyanate (the hot stuff in horseradish) is so volatile it'll
    > oxidize and/or dissipate before it has a chance to make the spuds glow
    > in that yummy horseradish manner if they're too hot when you mix them
    > in.
    >
    > The same goes for wasabi, which has spiked mashers in my house on
    > occasion. The kick comes from the same volatile chemical.
    >



    Hmmmmmmmmmm, I have powdered wasabi in the fridge, might try that next
    time.


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    Killfile all Google Groups posters.........

    http://improve-usenet.org/

    http://improve-usenet.org/filters_bg.html

  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sat 07 Mar 2009 09:27:27p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...

    > On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>James wrote:
    >>> I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >>> off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >>> than pelling before cooking.
    >>>
    >>> So far I just mash and add butter.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions?

    >>
    >>Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed
    >>potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.

    >
    > Do they make those in an electric version yet? They must! I have too
    > many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.
    >
    > Carol
    >


    My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted conical
    wooden pusher. Far less strength and energy required.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  9. #9
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:38:50 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat 07 Mar 2009 09:27:27p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...
    >
    >> On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600, Janet Wilder
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed
    >>>potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.

    >>
    >> Do they make those in an electric version yet? They must! I have too
    >> many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

    >
    >My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted conical
    >wooden pusher. Far less strength and energy required.


    Oh, those jellty-making cones? I used to have one. Got lost in one
    of our moves.

    Carol

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    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  10. #10
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sat 07 Mar 2009 09:50:18p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...

    > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:38:50 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat 07 Mar 2009 09:27:27p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600, Janet Wilder
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the
    >>>>mashed potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.
    >>>
    >>> Do they make those in an electric version yet? They must! I have too
    >>> many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

    >>
    >>My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted
    >>conical wooden pusher. Far less strength and energy required.

    >
    > Oh, those jellty-making cones? I used to have one. Got lost in one
    > of our moves.
    >
    > Carol
    >


    Yep, that's pretty much the kind. It sat in a 3-legged stand.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  11. #11
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:38:50 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat 07 Mar 2009 09:27:27p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600, Janet Wilder
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the
    >>>>mashed potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.
    >>>
    >>> Do they make those in an electric version yet? They must! I have
    >>> too many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

    >>
    >>My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted
    >>conical wooden pusher. Far less strength and energy required.

    >
    > Oh, those jellty-making cones? I used to have one. Got lost in one
    > of our moves.
    >
    > Carol
    >


    There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is
    forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better
    ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the
    seeds behind, does mash spuds leaving the skins behind...makes baby food.
    It has a mess of aplications.

    Mostly I use mine when making ice cream and frozen yogurt to puree the
    berries and remove the seeds for a smoother base; that is seedless.

    It was rated as second choice for mashing spuds...first choice was a ricer.
    Rating was on texture..the lowly potato masher came in last.

    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  12. #12
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes



    modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
    > On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 19:45:33 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In article
    >><[email protected]>,
    >>James <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >>>off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >>>than pelling before cooking.
    >>>
    >>>So far I just mash and add butter.
    >>>
    >>>Any suggestions?

    >>
    >>There are a million and one recipes for spuds.
    >>Have you googled for that yet?

    >
    >
    > Roasted garlic mashed with the taters can be good, especially if you
    > cream them up with -- erm -- cream.


    Or just toss the peeled cloves in with the potatoes to boil, mash with
    the potatoes & add the butter & i like buttermilk rather than cream.

    Of course, IMO, one has to have a good beef gravy with mashed potatoes.
    for which i will pan fry some English de-boned rib meat, just for the
    pan juices it produces with which to make the gravy.

    As the rib meat has to be braised for a couple of hours to be fork
    tender i will set them aside after sautˇing them and braise them the
    next day.
    --
    JL


  13. #13
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes



    Janet Wilder wrote:
    > James wrote:
    >
    >> I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins. They come
    >> off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers. Still I rather do that
    >> than pelling before cooking.
    >>
    >> So far I just mash and add butter.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?

    >
    >
    > Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed
    > potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.
    >


    Or wash well and mash after boiling with skin on, while its not
    noticeable with the new white potatoes, and i think is good even with
    the new red potatoes, i find even russets or Idaho's ok with their skins
    left on.
    --
    JL


  14. #14
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 05:34:44 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is
    >forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better
    >ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the
    >seeds behind, does mash spuds leaving the skins behind...makes baby food.
    >It has a mess of aplications.
    >
    >Mostly I use mine when making ice cream and frozen yogurt to puree the
    >berries and remove the seeds for a smoother base; that is seedless.
    >
    >It was rated as second choice for mashing spuds...first choice was a ricer.
    >Rating was on texture..the lowly potato masher came in last.


    Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them. Last
    night, I mashed them, though. Yeah, the texture left something to be
    desired.

    Carol

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  15. #15
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    Carol wrote:

    > Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them. Last
    > night, I mashed them, though. Yeah, the texture left something to be
    > desired.


    It's a shame your sound card isn't working ...

    Addicted to Spuds

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uXv9...eature=related

    --Lin

  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    On Sat 07 Mar 2009 11:42:35p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...

    > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 05:34:44 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is
    >>forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better
    >>ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the
    >>seeds behind, does mash spuds leaving the skins behind...makes baby
    >>food. It has a mess of aplications.
    >>
    >>Mostly I use mine when making ice cream and frozen yogurt to puree the
    >>berries and remove the seeds for a smoother base; that is seedless.
    >>
    >>It was rated as second choice for mashing spuds...first choice was a
    >>ricer. Rating was on texture..the lowly potato masher came in last.

    >
    > Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them. Last
    > night, I mashed them, though. Yeah, the texture left something to be
    > desired.
    >
    > Carol
    >


    I haven't used a potato masher in years, since my favorite one broke. I
    peel and cube potatoes before cooking, drain and shake dry the potatoes
    cubes over heat. I use an old hand mixer on low speed to whip them, whilst
    adding either cream or buttermilk and butter. I call them "mashed". :-)
    Neither David nor I like lumpy potatotes. Occasionally I use a ricer.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  17. #17
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > I haven't used a potato masher in years, since my favorite one broke. I
    > peel and cube potatoes before cooking, drain and shake dry the potatoes
    > cubes over heat. I use an old hand mixer on low speed to whip them, whilst
    > adding either cream or buttermilk and butter. I call them "mashed". :-)
    > Neither David nor I like lumpy potatotes. Occasionally I use a ricer.


    I uses a hand mixer as well. They are creamy, smooth, fluffy goodness!
    Bob certainly doesn't complain.

    --Lin (Bob does like using the ricer and I don't)

  18. #18
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    Lin wrote:

    > (Bob does like using the ricer and I don't)


    Using a ricer means not having to peel potatoes.

    Bob

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    In article <[email protected]>,
    hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > On Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:38:50 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>On Sat 07 Mar 2009 09:27:27p, Damsel in dis Dress told us...
    > >>
    > >>> On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600, Janet Wilder
    > >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the
    > >>>>mashed potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.
    > >>>
    > >>> Do they make those in an electric version yet? They must! I have
    > >>> too many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.
    > >>
    > >>My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted
    > >>conical wooden pusher. Far less strength and energy required.

    > >
    > > Oh, those jellty-making cones? I used to have one. Got lost in one
    > > of our moves.
    > >
    > > Carol
    > >

    >
    > There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is
    > forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better
    > ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the
    > seeds behind, does mash spuds leaving the skins behind...makes baby food.
    > It has a mess of aplications.
    >
    > Mostly I use mine when making ice cream and frozen yogurt to puree the
    > berries and remove the seeds for a smoother base; that is seedless.
    >
    > It was rated as second choice for mashing spuds...first choice was a ricer.
    > Rating was on texture..the lowly potato masher came in last.


    I just us a wand blender.
    --
    Peace! Om

    I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Mash potatoes

    In article <565d9$49b36afe$453e8ce6$[email protected]>,
    Lin <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Carol wrote:
    >
    > > Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them. Last
    > > night, I mashed them, though. Yeah, the texture left something to be
    > > desired.

    >
    > It's a shame your sound card isn't working ...
    >
    > Addicted to Spuds
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uXv9...eature=related
    >
    > --Lin


    <lol>

    That is one thing I have promised myself when I hit my goal weight...

    A baked potato from "Outback"!!!
    --
    Peace! Om

    I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe. -- Dalai Lama

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