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Thread: Marmalade

  1. #1
    JBurns Guest

    Default Marmalade


    I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:

    http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php

    I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.

    Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    more.

    It is very nice. I just had some on toast.

    JB

  2. #2
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:
    >
    > http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php
    >
    > I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    > that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    > liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.


    Setting point can occur just a few minutes after it wasn't ready
    (IYSWIM) so you probably were just too quick off the mark.
    >
    > Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    > back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    > marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    > probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    > more.
    >
    > It is very nice. I just had some on toast.


    You just can't buy shop marmalade that's as good.
    I use this recipe ( but sub any citrus fruit I fancy)

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/t...e/traditional-
    seville-orange-marmalade.html

    and always test for setting exactly the way she says.. I put a few
    saucers in the freezer before I start.

    I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    yet

    My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    produce show last week.

    Janet UK


  3. #3
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] says...
    >>
    >> I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:
    >>
    >> http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php
    >>
    >> I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    >> that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    >> liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.

    >
    > Setting point can occur just a few minutes after it wasn't ready
    >(IYSWIM) so you probably were just too quick off the mark.
    >>
    >> Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    >> back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    >> marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    >> probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    >> more.
    >>
    >> It is very nice. I just had some on toast.

    >
    > You just can't buy shop marmalade that's as good.
    > I use this recipe ( but sub any citrus fruit I fancy)
    >
    > http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/t...e/traditional-
    >seville-orange-marmalade.html
    >
    > and always test for setting exactly the way she says.. I put a few
    >saucers in the freezer before I start.
    >
    > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    >marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    >yet
    >
    > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    >produce show last week.
    >
    > Janet UK


    I use that recipe of Delia's too, it is excellent and if you follow
    her set test, it's no fail. I hate recipes that add pectin, even
    strawberry jam can be made to set without it. Don't make it anymore
    but always used to make pounds of it when the kids were young.

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On 22/08/2013 7:51 AM, Janet wrote:

    >> It is very nice. I just had some on toast.

    >
    > You just can't buy shop marmalade that's as good.
    > I use this recipe ( but sub any citrus fruit I fancy)
    >
    > http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/t...e/traditional-
    > seville-orange-marmalade.html
    >
    > and always test for setting exactly the way she says.. I put a few
    > saucers in the freezer before I start.
    >
    > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    > marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    > yet


    US recipe?? It was in Canadian Living. I am going to take a bold step
    and assume that it a Canadian recipe.

    I am also going to assume that the instructions were badly worded.There
    is no previous mention of sterilizing the jars and tops, and that is
    generally done before they are filled.

    I have different methods of sterilizing jars. Sometimes I wash and rinse
    the jars and then set them upside down in an oven and heat them to about
    300 degrees while I am preparing the preserves. Sometimes I invert them
    in a pot of water and bring it to a boil.



    >
    > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    > produce show last week.



    I love marmalade and used to make Seville Orange Marmalade.
    Unfortunately, my system has been making stronger and stronger
    objections to me consuming citrus. It got to the point where I could no
    longer eat oranges or grapefruit. I occasionally had a piece of toast
    with a little marmalade, but it never seemed to take much to set me off.
    I have at leas t a dozen jars of marmalade that are probably 10 years
    old, and I should have given them away years ago.

    Now that my gall bladder is gone, maybe I can experiment with citrus
    again. I would love to sit down and eat an orange or some grapefruit,
    and I am really hoping that one day I can enjoy marmalade again.





  5. #5
    JBurns Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 09:14:39 -0300, [email protected] wrote:

    >On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>[email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>> I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php
    >>>
    >>> I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    >>> that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    >>> liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.

    >>
    >> Setting point can occur just a few minutes after it wasn't ready
    >>(IYSWIM) so you probably were just too quick off the mark.
    >>>
    >>> Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    >>> back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    >>> marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    >>> probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    >>> more.
    >>>
    >>> It is very nice. I just had some on toast.

    >>
    >> You just can't buy shop marmalade that's as good.
    >> I use this recipe ( but sub any citrus fruit I fancy)
    >>
    >> http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/t...e/traditional-
    >>seville-orange-marmalade.html
    >>
    >> and always test for setting exactly the way she says.. I put a few
    >>saucers in the freezer before I start.
    >>
    >> I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    >> In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    >> (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    >>marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    >>yet
    >>
    >> My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    >>produce show last week.
    >>
    >> Janet UK

    >
    >I use that recipe of Delia's too, it is excellent and if you follow
    >her set test, it's no fail. I hate recipes that add pectin, even
    >strawberry jam can be made to set without it. Don't make it anymore
    >but always used to make pounds of it when the kids were young.


    You are right. I think that is why I jumped the gun, because I never
    have trouble setting jam.

    I didn't use much pectin to set it, but thinking back I probably
    didn't need any. As soon as it came to the boil again it looked
    different, it kind of had a thick boil to it, a little like toffee.
    That should have told me it was at setting point right there. I put
    the jam set in it then and let it go for a few minutes and then tested
    it. I now think I should have tested it first.

    Anyhow, it is nice. I just had a piece of toast and marmalade for
    dessert. Not too sweet and plenty of bitterness coming through.

    JB


  6. #6
    JBurns Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >[email protected] says...
    >>
    >> I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:
    >>
    >> http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php
    >>
    >> I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    >> that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    >> liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.

    >
    > Setting point can occur just a few minutes after it wasn't ready
    >(IYSWIM) so you probably were just too quick off the mark.


    Yes, I should have tested it when I brought it back to the boil,
    before adding the pectin. The boil just looked different, sort of
    thicker.

    >>
    >> Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    >> back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    >> marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    >> probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    >> more.
    >>
    >> It is very nice. I just had some on toast.

    >
    > You just can't buy shop marmalade that's as good.
    > I use this recipe ( but sub any citrus fruit I fancy)
    >
    > http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/t...e/traditional-
    >seville-orange-marmalade.html
    >
    > and always test for setting exactly the way she says.. I put a few
    >saucers in the freezer before I start.
    >
    > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    >marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    >yet
    >
    > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    >produce show last week.


    I do the exact same thing with jam, regarding sterilising jars etc.
    Other products I will give the BWB, but not jam.

    JB

    >
    > Janet UK


  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On 22/08/2013 9:27 AM, JBurns wrote:

    > Yes, I should have tested it when I brought it back to the boil,
    > before adding the pectin. The boil just looked different, sort of
    > thicker.


    The testing is an important part of the process, especially when not
    using pectin.


    I hate having to go through the work of re-cooking and resterilizing a
    batch. It has happened. I also learned that sometimes it sets up over
    time. I had a batch that was too runny and I did not have the time to
    re-cook it. I let it sit out for a while and after a few days it seemed
    a little thicker. I figured that instead of having to re-do everything,
    I could simply re-cook it a jar at a time as I opened them. As it turned
    out, only a couple needed to be cooked down more. The rest sat long
    enough that they eventually thickened on their own.



  8. #8
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 16:26:19 +0800, JBurns <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:
    >
    >http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php
    >
    >I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    >that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    >liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.
    >
    >Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    >back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    >marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    >probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    >more.
    >
    >It is very nice. I just had some on toast.
    >
    >JB

    congratulations on the save. good job.
    Janet US

  9. #9
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    snip
    >
    > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    >marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    >yet
    >
    > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    >produce show last week.
    >
    > Janet UK


    That's the way that my mother did it. We are told that it is not safe
    to do that. It probably is safe for jam-type foods because of the
    high sugar content; but if you process the filled jars, you eliminate
    the possibility of losing stock as a result of mold around lid.
    Janet US

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 16:26:19 +0800, JBurns <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > I made five fruits marmalade last night. Used this recipe:
    >
    > http://www.canadianliving.com/food/f..._marmalade.php
    >
    > I did not do the setting test because I have never had a marmalade
    > that didn't set, so of course, it didn't set. Bugger. I did check the
    > liquid amount before adding the sugar so not sure what happened.
    >
    > Anyway, this morning I bought some jam setter, emptied all the jars
    > back into the pot, re-washed and re-sterilised the jars, re-boiled the
    > marmalade and added the setter. It only took 10 grams to set, so would
    > probably have set by itself if I had boiled it for five or 10 minutes
    > more.
    >
    > It is very nice. I just had some on toast.
    >

    Congratulations on saving the day for yourself!

    I have canned very little in terms of years/decades - but one of my
    friends has a couple of backyard plum trees and gave me a large bag of
    plums (twice) this summer which I turned into jam. I tried making
    plum jam with no pectin first but wasn't happy with how long I needed
    to boil it to get it to a jammy state, so I tried it the next time
    with a low sugar pectin. I made the no pectin batch with lemon and
    added peaches to the batch with low sugar pectin. OMG! Both are so
    yummy that I make excuses to eat breakfast just so I can spread them
    on something and am wondering why I don't do this every summer. So,
    I'm motivated to make a couple of other jams/jellies that I haven't
    made in practically forever and one that I've wanted to make but never
    have.

    My big accomplishment this week was to make pectin. I have a couple
    of apple trees in the back yard that are in the process of dropping
    unripe fruit, so I gathered up what was on the ground a few days ago -
    chopped them up and turned them into pectin. It's surprising how much
    volume is needed to produce such a small amount, but I was motivated
    to give it another try. Fortunately for me there were twice as many
    fallen apples to pick up yesterday - so I'll be at it again today. I
    need to buy some larger canning jars though because the directions I
    have for using homemade say you need 4-6 Tablespoons of homemade
    pectin for every ONE cup of prepared low pectin juice when making
    jelly (which I'll assume is used in about the same proportion for
    jam). Hopefully I'll have enough home made pectin in the end to
    process the rest of plum/peach pulp I have sitting in the freezer
    waiting for me to process it. If I don't, then I'll use it for the
    smaller batch of japaleņo jelly that I want to make soon.

    What method do you use to test how well your jam is setting up? I've
    only used the "cold" method in the past, but just learned how to use
    alcohol to test pectin and am wondering if alcohol would work with
    jam/jelly too?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #11
    graham Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade


    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > snip
    >>
    >> I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    >> In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    >> (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    >>marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    >>yet
    >>
    >> My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    >>produce show last week.
    >>
    >> Janet UK

    >
    > That's the way that my mother did it. We are told that it is not safe
    > to do that. It probably is safe for jam-type foods because of the
    > high sugar content; but if you process the filled jars, you eliminate
    > the possibility of losing stock as a result of mold around lid.
    > Janet US
    >

    But if the jars are hot and the lids are sterilized in boiling water, the
    addition of hot jam at a much higher temperature than 100C means that there
    is no chance of any bug surviving.
    Graham



  12. #12
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > snip
    > >
    > > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    > >marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    > >yet
    > >
    > > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    > >produce show last week.
    > >
    > > Janet UK

    >
    > That's the way that my mother did it. We are told that it is not safe
    > to do that. It probably is safe for jam-type foods because of the
    > high sugar content; but if you process the filled jars, you eliminate
    > the possibility of losing stock as a result of mold around lid.
    > Janet US


    No danger :-)In 40+ years of making jam and marmalade I've never
    lost any or had it go mouldy.

    I just wash rinse and sterilise the jars and lids carefully, fill when
    the jars are still hot and seal right away. (I boil the lids to
    sterilise). I re-use the same jars and screwtop lids year after year.

    Janet UK



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 09:42:43 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I hate having to go through the work of re-cooking and resterilizing a
    > batch. It has happened. I also learned that sometimes it sets up over
    > time. I had a batch that was too runny and I did not have the time to
    > re-cook it. I let it sit out for a while and after a few days it seemed
    > a little thicker. I figured that instead of having to re-do everything,
    > I could simply re-cook it a jar at a time as I opened them. As it turned
    > out, only a couple needed to be cooked down more. The rest sat long
    > enough that they eventually thickened on their own.
    >


    Thanks! I knew they often set up over a couple of weeks, but didn't
    know it could happen over a longer period of time too... and I like
    your common sense approach of recooking/thickening up one jar at a
    time on an as needed basis.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 08:01:30 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > snip
    > >
    > > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    > >marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    > >yet
    > >
    > > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    > >produce show last week.
    > >
    > > Janet UK

    >
    > That's the way that my mother did it. We are told that it is not safe
    > to do that. It probably is safe for jam-type foods because of the
    > high sugar content; but if you process the filled jars, you eliminate
    > the possibility of losing stock as a result of mold around lid.
    > Janet US


    We have an aversion to botulism and even though acid + sugar is a
    preservative, we still think it's better to be safe than sorry.

    Stolen from a home canning web site:

    You're not from another planet, though you haven't kept up with
    advances in research and understanding of various bacteria, yeast,
    etc. In earlier years this information was not known or understood
    completely, though they knew there was "something" there.

    The whole purpose of "canning", whether it is in a Boiling Water Bath
    for high-acid foods or Pressure Canning for low-acid foods, is to
    pasteurize the food so that any bacterial spore that causes spoilage
    will be destroyed and have it done while no air is present that could
    recontaminate the food, so that the food can be stored at room
    temperature for a long period of time.

    Home preserved foods also have no (commercial) preservatives in them,
    so there is a higher probability of adverse growths in the product
    over time, if steps are not taken to prevent or slow down that growth.

    Not a big problem with jams and jellies, but the molds and other
    things that can grow in them can make people sick. Of course not every
    jar is grossly contaminated and, if sanitary conditions are maintained
    and the food is stored in cool places like cellars, good luck may
    continue for years.

    The real problem was low-acid foods and the Botulism Toxin, which
    really became more understood in the 1990's and caused the reprinting
    and testing of all books and recipes.

    The pasteurization process is a VERY serious issue and we see it
    regularly in the commercial food industry where there is required
    testing. Even a "hint" of a problem causes a recall and often the
    bankruptcy of companies involved. Unfortunately such testing and
    inspection does not occur in the household.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  15. #15
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 08:01:30 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 12:51:26 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > snip
    > > >
    > > > I don't understand why US recipes boil the filled jars.
    > > > In the UK we never do. We sterilise the jars before filling
    > > > (stand them in a roasting tin in the oven at 120). I still have some
    > > >marmalade from January 2012 and it hasn't gone off; it will last years
    > > >yet
    > > >
    > > > My 2013 red grapefruit and orange marmalade won a prize in the local
    > > >produce show last week.
    > > >
    > > > Janet UK

    > >
    > > That's the way that my mother did it. We are told that it is not safe
    > > to do that. It probably is safe for jam-type foods because of the
    > > high sugar content; but if you process the filled jars, you eliminate
    > > the possibility of losing stock as a result of mold around lid.
    > > Janet US

    >
    > We have an aversion to botulism

    and even though acid + sugar is a
    > preservative, we still think it's better to be safe than sorry.



    Botulism is a notifiable disease here, which means every case diagnosed
    (and its source) is compulsorily recorded. Since 1922, there have been
    17 recorded incidents of food-borne botulism in the UK, and none of the
    sources were jam/marmalade.

    Janet UK.

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 16:14:42 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > says...
    > >
    > >
    > > We have an aversion to botulism

    > and even though acid + sugar is a
    > > preservative, we still think it's better to be safe than sorry.

    >
    >
    > Botulism is a notifiable disease here, which means every case diagnosed
    > (and its source) is compulsorily recorded. Since 1922, there have been
    > 17 recorded incidents of food-borne botulism in the UK, and none of the
    > sources were jam/marmalade.
    >
    > Janet UK.


    I don't consider it a hardship to give whatever I've made a 10 minute
    hot water bath, but I have the necessary tools to do it and don't have
    many jars to process when I do. I'd probably have a different
    attitude if I made large batches, but I don't. The new to me thing
    that I just learned this morning is to wipe the rim of jars with a
    vinegar dampened cloth or paper towel (I've only used water up to
    now). Hopefully, this new information stays put in my head until the
    next time I make jam.

    Thanks to both you and JB, I've pinned your recipes to an appropriate
    Pinterest board for easy access in the future.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  17. #17
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 16:14:42 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > > says...
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > We have an aversion to botulism

    > > and even though acid + sugar is a
    > > > preservative, we still think it's better to be safe than sorry.

    > >
    > >
    > > Botulism is a notifiable disease here, which means every case diagnosed
    > > (and its source) is compulsorily recorded. Since 1922, there have been
    > > 17 recorded incidents of food-borne botulism in the UK, and none of the
    > > sources were jam/marmalade.
    > >
    > > Janet UK.

    >
    > I don't consider it a hardship to give whatever I've made a 10 minute
    > hot water bath, but I have the necessary tools to do it and don't have
    > many jars to process when I do. I'd probably have a different
    > attitude if I made large batches, but I don't. The new to me thing
    > that I just learned this morning is to wipe the rim of jars with a
    > vinegar dampened cloth or paper towel (I've only used water up to
    > now).


    Why wipe the rims?

    I don't touch the jars at all between when they leave the hot oven and
    the lid gets screwed on.. and I'm careful not to touch the inside of the
    sterilised lid.

    Janet

  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On 22/08/2013 7:12 PM, Janet wrote:
    ..
    >>
    >> I don't consider it a hardship to give whatever I've made a 10 minute
    >> hot water bath, but I have the necessary tools to do it and don't have
    >> many jars to process when I do. I'd probably have a different
    >> attitude if I made large batches, but I don't. The new to me thing
    >> that I just learned this morning is to wipe the rim of jars with a
    >> vinegar dampened cloth or paper towel (I've only used water up to
    >> now).

    >
    > Why wipe the rims?
    >
    > I don't touch the jars at all between when they leave the hot oven and
    > the lid gets screwed on.. and I'm careful not to touch the inside of the
    > sterilised lid.
    >


    Can you pour all the jam into the jars and get tops on without spilling
    any at all? I can't.


  19. #19
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 19:31:06 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 22/08/2013 7:12 PM, Janet wrote:
    >.
    >>>
    >>> I don't consider it a hardship to give whatever I've made a 10 minute
    >>> hot water bath, but I have the necessary tools to do it and don't have
    >>> many jars to process when I do. I'd probably have a different
    >>> attitude if I made large batches, but I don't. The new to me thing
    >>> that I just learned this morning is to wipe the rim of jars with a
    >>> vinegar dampened cloth or paper towel (I've only used water up to
    >>> now).

    >>
    >> Why wipe the rims?
    >>
    >> I don't touch the jars at all between when they leave the hot oven and
    >> the lid gets screwed on.. and I'm careful not to touch the inside of the
    >> sterilised lid.
    >>

    >
    >Can you pour all the jam into the jars and get tops on without spilling
    >any at all? I can't.


    Use a funnel, there are ones made specific for the task, fit nicely in
    the top of the jar with a wide neck.

  20. #20
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Marmalade

    In article <abxRt.210238$jW3.[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > On 22/08/2013 7:12 PM, Janet wrote:
    > .
    > >>
    > >> I don't consider it a hardship to give whatever I've made a 10 minute
    > >> hot water bath, but I have the necessary tools to do it and don't have
    > >> many jars to process when I do. I'd probably have a different
    > >> attitude if I made large batches, but I don't. The new to me thing
    > >> that I just learned this morning is to wipe the rim of jars with a
    > >> vinegar dampened cloth or paper towel (I've only used water up to
    > >> now).

    > >
    > > Why wipe the rims?
    > >
    > > I don't touch the jars at all between when they leave the hot oven and
    > > the lid gets screwed on.. and I'm careful not to touch the inside of the
    > > sterilised lid.
    > >

    >
    > Can you pour all the jam into the jars and get tops on without spilling
    > any at all? I can't.


    Yes, I use a ss jug with a good lip. You could try a SS funnel (sold
    for jam making)

    Janet UK

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