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Thread: Making home made pesto question

  1. #1
    Anthony Ferrante Guest

    Default Making home made pesto question

    I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    what type of mortar should I get?

    Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    the grocery store? Any good?

    Anthony

  2. #2
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Anthony Ferrante <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > the time and trouble to make it?
    > Anthony


    Yes, there is a difference and if you have a blender or a food processor
    it doesn't take much time and it's no trouble to make fresh.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Huffy and Bubbles Do France: http://www.jamlady.eboard.com

  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Anthony Ferrante <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > the time and trouble to make it?
    > Anthony


    Yes, there is a difference and if you have a blender or a food processor
    it doesn't take much time and it's no trouble to make fresh.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Huffy and Bubbles Do France: http://www.jamlady.eboard.com

  4. #4
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    Anthony Ferrante <[email protected]>
    news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    > when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    > are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    > what type of mortar should I get?
    >
    > Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    > the grocery store? Any good?


    You can certainly tell the dif between fresh and the jarred. While some of
    the jarred pesto is good... fresh is better. I make it fresh in the food
    processor. Takes no time at all and you can really tell the difference.
    Don't forget the garlic

    Michael
    --
    "I eat vegetarians for breakfast"
    ~unknown but seen on a bumper sticker

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  5. #5
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    Anthony Ferrante <[email protected]>
    news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    > when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    > are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    > what type of mortar should I get?
    >
    > Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    > the grocery store? Any good?


    You can certainly tell the dif between fresh and the jarred. While some of
    the jarred pesto is good... fresh is better. I make it fresh in the food
    processor. Takes no time at all and you can really tell the difference.
    Don't forget the garlic

    Michael
    --
    "I eat vegetarians for breakfast"
    ~unknown but seen on a bumper sticker

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  6. #6
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question


    "Michael "Dog3"" <don'[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    > Anthony Ferrante <[email protected]>
    > news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >> I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    >> making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    >> the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    >> when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    >> are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    >> what type of mortar should I get?
    >>
    >> Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    >> the grocery store? Any good?

    >
    > You can certainly tell the dif between fresh and the jarred. While some of
    > the jarred pesto is good... fresh is better. I make it fresh in the food
    > processor. Takes no time at all and you can really tell the difference.
    > Don't forget the garlic
    >
    > Michael


    I concur. Food processor pesto is a snap.

    Another thing is that if you luck into a quantity of inexpensive fresh
    basil--or grow it--you can make a big batch of fresh pesto and freeze it in
    cubes to have any time. And it definitely beats stuff in jars and is a lot
    cheaper.

    What I usually do when I want to make the frozen stuff--when the end of the
    outdoor growing season is approaching and I want to use up all of the basil
    plants, for example--is make a quantity of "pesto base" in the food
    processor using just basil, garlic, and olive oil. I pour it into an 8" or
    so square cake pan and freeze it. Then I turn it out and cut it into 2" or
    so chunks, and put them back in the freezer in a plastic bag. I throw cubes
    into sauces and soups all winter, or use them to make pasta-style pesto
    (adding pine nuts and cheese).

    I know some people say they do the same thing, but freeze it in plastic ice
    cube trays instead, then turn out the cubes and bag them. Our ice cube trays
    are long gone, or I'd do that, too.

    I've also made it with the pine nuts but not the cheese--I think according
    to Marcella Hazan's advice, IIRC--and frozen that. I usually just leave out
    the pine nuts because I don't necessarily want them in sauces and soups.



  7. #7
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question


    "Michael "Dog3"" <don'[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    > Anthony Ferrante <[email protected]>
    > news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >> I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    >> making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    >> the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    >> when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    >> are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    >> what type of mortar should I get?
    >>
    >> Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    >> the grocery store? Any good?

    >
    > You can certainly tell the dif between fresh and the jarred. While some of
    > the jarred pesto is good... fresh is better. I make it fresh in the food
    > processor. Takes no time at all and you can really tell the difference.
    > Don't forget the garlic
    >
    > Michael


    I concur. Food processor pesto is a snap.

    Another thing is that if you luck into a quantity of inexpensive fresh
    basil--or grow it--you can make a big batch of fresh pesto and freeze it in
    cubes to have any time. And it definitely beats stuff in jars and is a lot
    cheaper.

    What I usually do when I want to make the frozen stuff--when the end of the
    outdoor growing season is approaching and I want to use up all of the basil
    plants, for example--is make a quantity of "pesto base" in the food
    processor using just basil, garlic, and olive oil. I pour it into an 8" or
    so square cake pan and freeze it. Then I turn it out and cut it into 2" or
    so chunks, and put them back in the freezer in a plastic bag. I throw cubes
    into sauces and soups all winter, or use them to make pasta-style pesto
    (adding pine nuts and cheese).

    I know some people say they do the same thing, but freeze it in plastic ice
    cube trays instead, then turn out the cubes and bag them. Our ice cube trays
    are long gone, or I'd do that, too.

    I've also made it with the pine nuts but not the cheese--I think according
    to Marcella Hazan's advice, IIRC--and frozen that. I usually just leave out
    the pine nuts because I don't necessarily want them in sauces and soups.



  8. #8
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    "Janet" <[email protected]>
    news:48591aae$0$30167$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > I concur. Food processor pesto is a snap.
    >
    > Another thing is that if you luck into a quantity of inexpensive fresh
    > basil--or grow it--you can make a big batch of fresh pesto and freeze
    > it in cubes to have any time. And it definitely beats stuff in jars
    > and is a lot cheaper.


    Yep. The old ice cube tray works well. Cube, freeze, bag.

    >
    > What I usually do when I want to make the frozen stuff--when the end
    > of the outdoor growing season is approaching and I want to use up all
    > of the basil plants, for example--is make a quantity of "pesto base"
    > in the food processor using just basil, garlic, and olive oil. I pour
    > it into an 8" or so square cake pan and freeze it. Then I turn it out
    > and cut it into 2" or so chunks, and put them back in the freezer in a
    > plastic bag. I throw cubes into sauces and soups all winter, or use
    > them to make pasta-style pesto (adding pine nuts and cheese).


    Ohhhh... This is a great method. I'll try this next time and freeze the
    cubes up with the Handi Vac.

    >
    > I know some people say they do the same thing, but freeze it in
    > plastic ice cube trays instead, then turn out the cubes and bag them.
    > Our ice cube trays are long gone, or I'd do that, too.
    >
    > I've also made it with the pine nuts but not the cheese--I think
    > according to Marcella Hazan's advice, IIRC--and frozen that. I usually
    > just leave out the pine nuts because I don't necessarily want them in
    > sauces and soups.


    I don't put in the pine nuts or the cheese either. I like to toast my
    pine nuts before putting them in the pesto. Like you, I don't necessarily
    want the nuts in sauce or soups.

    Michael

    --
    "I eat vegetarians for breakfast"
    ~unknown but seen on a bumper sticker

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  9. #9
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    "Janet" <[email protected]>
    news:48591aae$0$30167$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > I concur. Food processor pesto is a snap.
    >
    > Another thing is that if you luck into a quantity of inexpensive fresh
    > basil--or grow it--you can make a big batch of fresh pesto and freeze
    > it in cubes to have any time. And it definitely beats stuff in jars
    > and is a lot cheaper.


    Yep. The old ice cube tray works well. Cube, freeze, bag.

    >
    > What I usually do when I want to make the frozen stuff--when the end
    > of the outdoor growing season is approaching and I want to use up all
    > of the basil plants, for example--is make a quantity of "pesto base"
    > in the food processor using just basil, garlic, and olive oil. I pour
    > it into an 8" or so square cake pan and freeze it. Then I turn it out
    > and cut it into 2" or so chunks, and put them back in the freezer in a
    > plastic bag. I throw cubes into sauces and soups all winter, or use
    > them to make pasta-style pesto (adding pine nuts and cheese).


    Ohhhh... This is a great method. I'll try this next time and freeze the
    cubes up with the Handi Vac.

    >
    > I know some people say they do the same thing, but freeze it in
    > plastic ice cube trays instead, then turn out the cubes and bag them.
    > Our ice cube trays are long gone, or I'd do that, too.
    >
    > I've also made it with the pine nuts but not the cheese--I think
    > according to Marcella Hazan's advice, IIRC--and frozen that. I usually
    > just leave out the pine nuts because I don't necessarily want them in
    > sauces and soups.


    I don't put in the pine nuts or the cheese either. I like to toast my
    pine nuts before putting them in the pesto. Like you, I don't necessarily
    want the nuts in sauce or soups.

    Michael

    --
    "I eat vegetarians for breakfast"
    ~unknown but seen on a bumper sticker

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:36:08 -0400, Anthony Ferrante
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    >making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    >the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    >when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    >are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    >what type of mortar should I get?
    >
    >Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    >the grocery store? Any good?
    >

    Classico is very, very good - but fresh is, well, fresher! It has a
    pungent, green, basil taste to it that is missing in jarred. That
    aside, buying the ingredients for fresh pesto isn't cheap - so I
    usually just pick up a jar for my purposes (usually pizza).


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:36:08 -0400, Anthony Ferrante
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    >making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    >the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    >when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    >are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    >what type of mortar should I get?
    >
    >Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    >the grocery store? Any good?
    >

    Classico is very, very good - but fresh is, well, fresher! It has a
    pungent, green, basil taste to it that is missing in jarred. That
    aside, buying the ingredients for fresh pesto isn't cheap - so I
    usually just pick up a jar for my purposes (usually pizza).


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  12. #12
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Jun 18, 7:24*am, "Janet" <boxh...@maine.rr.com> wrote:
    > "Michael "Dog3"" <don't...@donttell.huh> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected] ..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Anthony Ferrante <ferrante276-ngs...@yahoo.com>
    > >news:[email protected]:i n rec.food.cooking

    >
    > >> I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > >> making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > >> the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    > >> when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    > >> are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    > >> what type of mortar should I get?

    >
    > >> Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    > >> the grocery store? Any good?

    >
    > > You can certainly tell the dif between fresh and the jarred. While someof
    > > the jarred pesto is good... fresh is better. I make it fresh in the food
    > > processor. *Takes no time at all and you can really tell the difference.
    > > Don't forget the garlic

    >
    > > Michael

    >
    > I concur. Food processor pesto is a snap.
    >
    > Another thing is that if you luck into a quantity of inexpensive fresh
    > basil--or grow it--you can make a big batch of fresh pesto and freeze it in
    > cubes to have any time. And it definitely beats stuff in jars and is a lot
    > cheaper.
    >
    > What I usually do when I want to make the frozen stuff--when the end of the
    > outdoor growing season is approaching and I want to use up all of the basil
    > plants, for example--is make a quantity of "pesto base" in the food
    > processor using just basil, garlic, and olive oil. I pour it into an 8" or
    > so square cake pan and freeze it. Then I turn it out and cut it into 2" or
    > so chunks, and put them back in the freezer in a plastic bag. I throw cubes
    > into sauces and soups all winter, or use them to make pasta-style pesto
    > (adding pine nuts and cheese).
    >
    > I know some people say they do the same thing, but freeze it in plastic ice
    > cube trays instead, then turn out the cubes and bag them. Our ice cube trays
    > are long gone, or I'd do that, too.
    >
    > I've also made it with the pine nuts but not the cheese--I think according
    > to Marcella Hazan's advice, IIRC--and frozen that. I usually just leave out
    > the pine nuts because I don't necessarily want them in sauces and soups.-Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I agree- I don't like the taste of pine nuts at all, so I don't even
    think about using them.

  13. #13
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Jun 18, 7:24*am, "Janet" <boxh...@maine.rr.com> wrote:
    > "Michael "Dog3"" <don't...@donttell.huh> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected] ..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Anthony Ferrante <ferrante276-ngs...@yahoo.com>
    > >news:[email protected]:i n rec.food.cooking

    >
    > >> I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > >> making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > >> the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    > >> when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    > >> are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    > >> what type of mortar should I get?

    >
    > >> Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    > >> the grocery store? Any good?

    >
    > > You can certainly tell the dif between fresh and the jarred. While someof
    > > the jarred pesto is good... fresh is better. I make it fresh in the food
    > > processor. *Takes no time at all and you can really tell the difference.
    > > Don't forget the garlic

    >
    > > Michael

    >
    > I concur. Food processor pesto is a snap.
    >
    > Another thing is that if you luck into a quantity of inexpensive fresh
    > basil--or grow it--you can make a big batch of fresh pesto and freeze it in
    > cubes to have any time. And it definitely beats stuff in jars and is a lot
    > cheaper.
    >
    > What I usually do when I want to make the frozen stuff--when the end of the
    > outdoor growing season is approaching and I want to use up all of the basil
    > plants, for example--is make a quantity of "pesto base" in the food
    > processor using just basil, garlic, and olive oil. I pour it into an 8" or
    > so square cake pan and freeze it. Then I turn it out and cut it into 2" or
    > so chunks, and put them back in the freezer in a plastic bag. I throw cubes
    > into sauces and soups all winter, or use them to make pasta-style pesto
    > (adding pine nuts and cheese).
    >
    > I know some people say they do the same thing, but freeze it in plastic ice
    > cube trays instead, then turn out the cubes and bag them. Our ice cube trays
    > are long gone, or I'd do that, too.
    >
    > I've also made it with the pine nuts but not the cheese--I think according
    > to Marcella Hazan's advice, IIRC--and frozen that. I usually just leave out
    > the pine nuts because I don't necessarily want them in sauces and soups.-Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I agree- I don't like the taste of pine nuts at all, so I don't even
    think about using them.

  14. #14
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    "Janet" <boxhill@maine.rr.c[email protected]> wrote in news:48591aae$0$30167
    $[email protected]:

    > Our ice cube trays
    > are long gone, or I'd do that, too.
    >
    >


    go to a dollar store and buy some, ice cube trays are very handy and quite
    inexpensive.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  15. #15
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in news:48591aae$0$30167
    $[email protected]:

    > Our ice cube trays
    > are long gone, or I'd do that, too.
    >
    >


    go to a dollar store and buy some, ice cube trays are very handy and quite
    inexpensive.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  16. #16
    Karen Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Jun 18, 8:46*am, merryb <msg...@juno.com> wrote:
    > I agree- I don't like the taste of pine nuts at all, so I don't even
    > think about using them.- Hide quoted text -


    Walnuts are a nice alternative to pine nuts in pesto.

    Karen

  17. #17
    Karen Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Jun 18, 8:46*am, merryb <msg...@juno.com> wrote:
    > I agree- I don't like the taste of pine nuts at all, so I don't even
    > think about using them.- Hide quoted text -


    Walnuts are a nice alternative to pine nuts in pesto.

    Karen

  18. #18
    Karen Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Jun 18, 5:36*am, Anthony Ferrante <ferrante276-ngs...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    > I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    > when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    > are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    > what type of mortar should I get?
    >
    > Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    > the grocery store? Any good?


    If you like "chunky" pesto, you can just chop up ingredients on a
    cutting board and mix them together in a bowl. This is my favorite way
    to make pesto, but it's probably not really pesto, if it's done this
    way. I used to use a blender but it needed too much oil to make the
    ingredients whirl around. A food processor really is the ultimate
    pesto maker but I guess I don't like cleaning it.

    Karen

  19. #19
    Karen Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Jun 18, 5:36*am, Anthony Ferrante <ferrante276-ngs...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    > I usually buy Classico pesto in a jar, but I have been thinking of
    > making it fresh. Is there that much of a taste difference to warrant
    > the time and trouble to make it? I want to get a mortar and pestle and
    > when I inquired about one on Ebay, the seller said the wooden mortars
    > are not meant for pesto, just mixing spices. Is this true and if so,
    > what type of mortar should I get?
    >
    > Anyone ever try the Beritolli's pesto in the refrigerated section of
    > the grocery store? Any good?


    If you like "chunky" pesto, you can just chop up ingredients on a
    cutting board and mix them together in a bowl. This is my favorite way
    to make pesto, but it's probably not really pesto, if it's done this
    way. I used to use a blender but it needed too much oil to make the
    ingredients whirl around. A food processor really is the ultimate
    pesto maker but I guess I don't like cleaning it.

    Karen

  20. #20
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Making home made pesto question

    On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 08:46:48 -0700 (PDT), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I agree- I don't like the taste of pine nuts at all, so I don't even
    >think about using them.


    I've never heard of anyone not liking pine nuts. To me they're like
    candy.

    Lou

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