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Thread: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    etc..) as well as salt and mayo.

    How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?

    My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    starch...

    -sw

  2. #2
    Moe DeLoughan Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On 7/17/2013 9:43 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    > serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    > etc..) as well as salt and mayo.
    >
    > How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    > vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?
    >
    > My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    > starch...


    I just don't add the salad dressing until right before serving it. I
    wouldn't consider adding a thickener because for me, it's not only
    that the dressing gets watery, it's that the veggies get limp. Adding
    a thickener doesn't address vegetable limpness.

  3. #3
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wednesday, July 17, 2013 10:43:06 AM UTC-4, Sqwertz wrote:
    > Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    >
    > serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    >
    > etc..) as well as salt and mayo.
    > How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    > vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?
    > My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    > starch...
    >
    > -sw


    Do not mix everything together until you are ready to eat.
    This means keep the dressing and tuna separate to the salad ingredients.

    Adding anything else to the mix sounds horrible. And by the way,
    I wish people would stop using the term "protein" incorrectly.
    There is protein in just about everything we eat.

    http://www.richardfisher.com

  4. #4
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    > serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    > etc..) as well as salt and mayo.
    >
    > How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    > vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?
    >
    > My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    > starch...
    >


    Hey, at least you don't have to go buy potato starch again! That stuff needs
    to be triple sealed once you open it. One false move and it will coat the
    entire kitchen in ultrafine powder. Just closing the package can produce a
    small dust cloud.

    I don't worry about liquid in those salads much. If a little liquid
    separates it accumulates on top and I just pour it off. With tuna I make
    sure it's very well drained. I don't get a lot of thinning of the mix, but
    then I put in minimal mayo and other wet ingredients. Maybe I'm just
    compensating in advance.

    MartyB


  5. #5
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    Helpful person <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I wish people would stop using the term "protein" incorrectly.
    > There is protein in just about everything we eat.
    >


    But people use the term "starch" the same way. Not saying there is starch in
    everything, but I see both as broad general terms which accurately describe
    the primary content. I've never felt confused by the term protein used in
    that context.

    MartyB


  6. #6
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 7/17/2013 12:55 PM, Helpful person wrote:
    > And by the way,
    > I wish people would stop using the term "protein" incorrectly.
    > There is protein in just about everything we eat.


    Not really. Not quality, fully bio available proteins, or significant
    enough content in starches or veggies or most legumes.

    Susan

  7. #7
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 7/17/2013 1:53 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > But people use the term "starch" the same way. Not saying there is
    > starch in everything, but I see both as broad general terms which
    > accurately describe the primary content. I've never felt confused by the
    > term protein used in that context.



    Exactly.

    I should have read ahead.

    Susan

  8. #8
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:r2pmoh6b7pql$.[email protected]..
    > Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    > serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    > etc..) as well as salt and mayo.
    >
    > How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    > vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?
    >
    > My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    > starch...


    I once bought a tuna salad seasoning that had bread crumbs in it. And some
    prepared ones do that too. I just let the fish part sit for a while in the
    fridge then drain it well before making the sandwich or putting it on the
    lettuce, in the tomato, etc.



  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 09:55:37 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person wrote:

    > Adding anything else to the mix sounds horrible. And by the way,
    > I wish people would stop using the term "protein" incorrectly.
    > There is protein in just about everything we eat.


    But in this context, when I mention vegetables and then the
    "proteins", certainly it was a correct culinary usage.

    And congrats for making your post wrap.

    -sw

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 12:21:33 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

    > I once bought a tuna salad seasoning that had bread crumbs in it. And some
    > prepared ones do that too. I just let the fish part sit for a while in the
    > fridge then drain it well before making the sandwich or putting it on the
    > lettuce, in the tomato, etc.


    But with draining, you're draining away much of the flavor. And
    moisture.

    -sw

  11. #11
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wednesday, July 17, 2013 3:34:52 PM UTC-4, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 09:55:37 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person wrote:
    >
    > > Adding anything else to the mix sounds horrible. And by the way,
    > > I wish people would stop using the term "protein" incorrectly.
    > > There is protein in just about everything we eat.

    >
    > But in this context, when I mention vegetables and then the
    > "proteins", certainly it was a correct culinary usage.
    >
    > And congrats for making your post wrap.
    >
    > -sw


    Unfortunately the term "protein" has become more or less
    common, and so has become "correct". That doesn't mean
    I have to like it. I abhor incorrect usage because
    either the user thinks it sounds cool or because of ignorance.
    Usually it's politicians that are at fault.

    And in answer to a previous poster, legumes are a very
    important source of protein. With grains they supply
    a complete set of amino acids necessary for good health.
    (I suppose that was a case of ignorance.)

    By the way, I did not get my lines to wrap properly. I
    edited quoted text and inserted my own line feeds.
    Much better than others having to do it.

    http://www.richardfisher.comn

  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 13:01:48 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person wrote:

    > By the way, I did not get my lines to wrap properly. I
    > edited quoted text and inserted my own line feeds.
    > Much better than others having to do it.


    Inserting your own line feeds is the same as making your lines wrap.
    You just have to keep track of proportional fonts and stick to 60-72
    characters per line (I'm so demanding). Yours looked fine.

    ObFood: The star-nosed mole is the quickest eating mammal on earth.
    It can identify and eat it's prey in as little as 120 milliseconds.
    With a face only a mother could love.

    -sw

  13. #13
    Moe DeLoughan Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On 7/17/2013 2:38 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 12:21:33 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> I once bought a tuna salad seasoning that had bread crumbs in it. And some
    >> prepared ones do that too. I just let the fish part sit for a while in the
    >> fridge then drain it well before making the sandwich or putting it on the
    >> lettuce, in the tomato, etc.

    >
    > But with draining, you're draining away much of the flavor. And
    > moisture.


    But you're replacing both with the salad dressing. I don't just drain
    my tuna, I rinse it and wring it dry in a clean washcloth, after which
    I squeeze fresh lime juice on it. Then it gets tossed in a very
    flavorful salad dressing. Frankly, canned tuna often has a tinny
    taste, and sometimes an overly fishy taste. Rinsing and squeezing go
    far to minimize those off flavors, and rid of excess oil or water
    enables it to absorb some of the salad dressing, which enhances its
    flavor.

  14. #14
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    > serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    > etc..) as well as salt and mayo.
    >
    > How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    > vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?
    >
    > My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    > starch...
    >
    > -sw


    I wouldn't add anything. Just pour off the water later....or I just mix it
    back in.

    G.

  15. #15
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wednesday, July 17, 2013 4:34:47 PM UTC-4, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > Inserting your own line feeds is the same as making your lines wrap.
    > You just have to keep track of proportional fonts and stick to 60-72
    > characters per line (I'm so demanding). Yours looked fine.
    >

    By the way, what do you use for news feeds?


  16. #16
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    x-no-archive:ye

    On 7/17/2013 4:01 PM, Helpful person wrote:
    > Unfortunately the term "protein" has become more or less
    > common, and so has become "correct". That doesn't mean
    > I have to like it. I abhor incorrect usage because
    > either the user thinks it sounds cool or because of ignorance.
    > Usually it's politicians that are at fault.


    It's not incorrect.

    >
    > And in answer to a previous poster, legumes are a very
    > important source of protein. With grains they supply
    > a complete set of amino acids necessary for good health.
    > (I suppose that was a case of ignorance.)


    It's not very well used protein. And the amount of starch you have to
    eat to get it is high calorie, highly glycemic and not conducive to good
    health.

    Susan

  17. #17
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On 7/17/2013 10:01 AM, Helpful person wrote:
    > By the way, I did not get my lines to wrap properly. I
    > edited quoted text and inserted my own line feeds.
    > Much better than others having to do it.


    That's just great, I miss those old days of carriage returns and forced
    formatting. Hopefully, we'll be able to start using manual typewriters
    soon. :-)

    >
    > http://www.richardfisher.comn
    >



  18. #18
    l not -l Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage


    On 17-Jul-2013, Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 12:21:33 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > > I once bought a tuna salad seasoning that had bread crumbs in it.
    > > And some
    > > prepared ones do that too. I just let the fish part sit for a while
    > > in the
    > > fridge then drain it well before making the sandwich or putting it
    > > on the
    > > lettuce, in the tomato, etc.

    >
    > But with draining, you're draining away much of the flavor. And
    > moisture.
    >
    > -sw

    In my experience, it is not the tuna liquid that leeches out; it's the
    liquid from the vegetation. I don't make these kind of salads often;
    but, when I do, I dice the vegetables, lightly salt and let sit for a
    while to draw out liquid. Then, drain thoroughly, including a quick
    wrap in toweling to absorb excess liquid. Then mix everything together
    - rarely is additional salt needed; though I must confess that I
    generally salt less than I suspect most do.

    Though I have not done so in this kind of salad, I have used dried,
    diced onion in other dishes that are prone to weeping liquid. They do a
    good job of absorbing excess liquid and add flavor vs. plain bread
    crumbs.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

    Bad decisions make good stories.

  19. #19
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > Say you're making a tuna or seafood salad that will rest a bit before
    > serving. It includes the usual vegetables (onion, celery, capers,
    > etc..) as well as salt and mayo.
    >
    > How do you keep the mixture thick and creamy rather than having the
    > vegetables and proteins sweat making the salads too wet?
    >
    > My first instinct is to try and add some corn, potato, or arrowroot
    > starch...
    >
    > -sw


    Do the math - salt brings the water out of things, so salt minimally and
    save the final seasoning until right before serving - which, as I stated
    in a previous thread, is my preference, anyway. Given that capers are
    usually salty, I might hold the capers out as well as most or all of the
    salt, and add those right before serving.

    If you're going to make some sort of roux/starch to thicken, I'd also
    hold that until the end, right before serving.

    -S-



  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Making Composite Salads with Less Leakage

    On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 14:02:40 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person wrote:

    > On Wednesday, July 17, 2013 4:34:47 PM UTC-4, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> Inserting your own line feeds is the same as making your lines wrap.
    >> You just have to keep track of proportional fonts and stick to 60-72
    >> characters per line (I'm so demanding). Yours looked fine.
    >>

    > By the way, what do you use for news feeds?


    For news feeds? I use blocknews.net. Costs $2.75 a lifetime with a
    one-time payment. I bought the $4.50 plan since I'm planning on being
    immortal.

    If you meant news READER, then I use 40tude Dialog - the most
    full-featured free newsreader there is.

    -sw

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