Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Make your own Chili Powder

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default Make your own Chili Powder


    I love Grandma's chili powder but haven't been able to find it for a
    while. Well, I finally figured out what the problem is - Grandma's
    was discontinued as of 12-09. Too bad, it was my favorite chili
    powder. Gebhardt's is such a distant second it wasn't in the running.
    I found a blog that talked about Grandma's demise and it had a pointer
    to a replacement recipe. So here it is for those who are Grandma's
    brand chili powder fans too.

    Note: I can buy the chilie's listed below at the supermarket in
    blister packs (ground), so I'll do that and skip the hunting for whole
    chilies and pulverizing them part.

    ````````````````

    From Texas Cooking Online
    http://www.texascooking.com

    How to Make Your Own Chili Powder
    or Some Like it Hot
    by Eleanor Bradshaw

    June may seem an unlikely month to present a how-to piece on making
    your own chili powder. Sure, there are lots of us who love chili year
    round, but many people really don't think about chili, especially
    making it, until the heat of summer has tapered off, and a nip is in
    the air.

    When it comes to something as seemingly superfluous as making your own
    chili powder, after the McCormick people have gone to the trouble of
    putting all those little bottles on the supermarket shelf, you need
    some lead time to turn the whole idea over in your mind.

    I'm not going to spend much time talking you into it. Its not hard to
    do. You don't need any special equipment. Its fun. And you end up with
    an incredibly good, fresh, unadulterated chili powder that will
    (excuse me, McCormick) put all those little bottles to shame. Not only
    that but, once you learn how to turn dried chiles into chili powder,
    you can keep a stock of your favorite chiles on hand to use whenever
    you wish, even if you live in an area where chiles are not readily
    available.

    Now, the following recipe is a guide -- something you can go by. The
    whole point of making your own chili powder is to make it to your own
    personal taste.

    Assemble the following ingredients:

    For mildness and flavor:

    * 4 Ancho chiles (dried poblanos)
    * 3 Dried New Mexico chiles

    For heat:

    * 3 to 5 Dried Chiles de Arbol or Cayenne

    For flavor:

    * 2 tablespoons cumin seeds, toasted
    * 2 tablespoons garlic powder
    * 2 teaspoons ground oregano (Mexican oregano, if you can get it)

    Preheat your oven to 300 F.

    Remove stems and seeds from all the chiles. Cut each chile in half
    with scissors and flatten the pieces. Incidentally, good dried chiles
    will still have some moisture in them and be fairly pliable. Don't use
    dried chiles that are so dry and fragile that they shatter when
    touched. Chile ristras and wreaths are wonderful decorative accents,
    but the chiles dry out and lose their flavor.


    Put the chiles in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for 4 or 5
    minutes. Remove the pan and check the chiles (they cool almost
    immediately). The smaller chiles will be toasted first, so remove them
    and set aside. Bake the larger pieces another 4 minutes and check
    again. The poblanos will be done last, but as portions of them toast,
    break them off and set aside returning the pan to the oven if
    necessary.

    When all chiles are toasted and crispy, break each piece into two or
    three pieces and place in a blender. Pulse briefly until you have
    powder.

    Toast the cumin seeds by placing them in a dry skillet over medium
    heat. Stir the seeds constantly being very careful not to let them
    scorch. When they are a few shades darker than the untoasted seeds,
    they are ready. Grind the toasted seeds with a mortar and pestle or
    with a rolling pin between two sheets of waxed paper.

    Add the ground cumin, garlic powder and oregano to the ground chiles
    in the blender. Pulse a few more times to thoroughly mix the powder,
    and you're through. You should have about 1 cup of chili powder,
    depending upon the size of your chiles.

    ```````````````````
    Then there's a fast (mild) version - add Cayenne or some other pepper
    for heat.

    Quick Chili Powder
    http://www.tastebook.com/recipes/104...e-Chili-Powder


    1 cup Ancho Powder

    1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano

    teaspoon garlic powder

    teaspoon ground cumin


    Combine all of the ingredients in a small mixing bowl and stir until
    thoroughly blended. Store the chili powder in an airtight container.



    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    sf wrote:
    >
    > I love Grandma's chili powder but haven't been able to find it for a
    > while. Well, I finally figured out what the problem is - Grandma's
    > was discontinued as of 12-09. Too bad, it was my favorite chili
    > powder. Gebhardt's is such a distant second it wasn't in the running.
    > I found a blog that talked about Grandma's demise and it had a pointer
    > to a replacement recipe. So here it is for those who are Grandma's
    > brand chili powder fans too.


    That's bad news, though it must have been 30 years
    since I bought my last jar. I used to buy it
    regularly, mostly for home-made tortilla chips.

    http://lawmama.blogspot.com/2009/07/...mas-chili.html

    As I recall, it had excellent balance of the ingredients.
    I'm surprised that it would not have enough sales
    to remain a viable product.

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 10:40:20 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > >
    > > I love Grandma's chili powder but haven't been able to find it for a
    > > while. Well, I finally figured out what the problem is - Grandma's
    > > was discontinued as of 12-09. Too bad, it was my favorite chili
    > > powder. Gebhardt's is such a distant second it wasn't in the running.
    > > I found a blog that talked about Grandma's demise and it had a pointer
    > > to a replacement recipe. So here it is for those who are Grandma's
    > > brand chili powder fans too.

    >
    > That's bad news, though it must have been 30 years
    > since I bought my last jar. I used to buy it
    > regularly, mostly for home-made tortilla chips.
    >
    > http://lawmama.blogspot.com/2009/07/...mas-chili.html
    >
    > As I recall, it had excellent balance of the ingredients.
    > I'm surprised that it would not have enough sales
    > to remain a viable product.


    I'm disappointed, but not surprised. Corporations often do things I
    don't agree with that apparently are better for their bottom line. My
    game plan is to keep an eye out for Wayzata Chili Powder and see how
    that tastes. So far, I'm coming up with nothing in the SFBA. If
    you're familiar with the brand and know where to buy it in a brick and
    mortar store around here - please let me know.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  4. #4
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    Sounds reasonable but I have a few observations:

    There is no particular advantage to mixing together ingredients
    into a "chili powder" as opposed to adding them separately
    into whatever you're cooking.

    The suggestion that chilis in ristras are too dried out to
    be used is completely wrong. Some ristras may be too old, sure,
    but bagged chilis in the grocery store are also sometimes
    too old. Ristras are not a purely decorative item, they are
    a traditional way, and a correct way of storing chilis for
    culinary use.

    Steve

  5. #5
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder


    Steve Pope <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Sounds reasonable but I have a few observations:
    >
    > There is no particular advantage to mixing together ingredients
    > into a "chili powder" as opposed to adding them separately
    > into whatever you're cooking.
    >
    > The suggestion that chilis in ristras are too dried out to
    > be used is completely wrong. Some ristras may be too old, sure,
    > but bagged chilis in the grocery store are also sometimes
    > too old. Ristras are not a purely decorative item, they are
    > a traditional way, and a correct way of storing chilis for
    > culinary use.
    >
    > Steve


    Agreed, it's the age and exposure to sunlight, not the storage method.
    Decomposition of color and flavor compounds is also hastened by grinding. If
    the color has faded on the chiles or you see tan anywhere on the chiles
    where you expected to see brick red, they are past their prime and should be
    tossed.

    I find that keeping a complete chile powder is very useful, and a
    convenience rather than preparing and adding all the individual ingredients
    every time you want some. But when incorporating individual ingredients as
    you suggest, I do it a little differently. Instead of toasting and grinding
    the dried chiles, I toast them, then submerge them in enough hot water to
    cover for 30 min to an hour. Then they go in the blender where they
    reconsititute into a good paste. I like to do this with chile anchos, adding
    in fresh garlic, ground toasted comino, and ground oregano, plus some lime
    juice. This makes a great sauce base for many red chile recipes. It can also
    be done with numex or anaheim type chiles, or guajillo, or they can be mixed
    with very nice results, usually, for me, 50/50 anchos to other chiles. I
    tend to keep a jarful of the stuff on hand in the fridge where it will keep
    for a couple of weeks.

    MartyB in KC



  6. #6
    Jinx Minx Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 10:40:20 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> sf wrote:
    >> >
    >> > I love Grandma's chili powder but haven't been able to find it for a
    >> > while. Well, I finally figured out what the problem is - Grandma's
    >> > was discontinued as of 12-09. Too bad, it was my favorite chili
    >> > powder. Gebhardt's is such a distant second it wasn't in the running.
    >> > I found a blog that talked about Grandma's demise and it had a pointer
    >> > to a replacement recipe. So here it is for those who are Grandma's
    >> > brand chili powder fans too.

    >>
    >> That's bad news, though it must have been 30 years
    >> since I bought my last jar. I used to buy it
    >> regularly, mostly for home-made tortilla chips.
    >>
    >> http://lawmama.blogspot.com/2009/07/...mas-chili.html
    >>
    >> As I recall, it had excellent balance of the ingredients.
    >> I'm surprised that it would not have enough sales
    >> to remain a viable product.

    >
    > I'm disappointed, but not surprised. Corporations often do things I
    > don't agree with that apparently are better for their bottom line. My
    > game plan is to keep an eye out for Wayzata Chili Powder and see how
    > that tastes. So far, I'm coming up with nothing in the SFBA. If
    > you're familiar with the brand and know where to buy it in a brick and
    > mortar store around here - please let me know.
    >
    > --
    > Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.


    It's actual name is Wayzata Bay. That might help you find it easier. I
    can't tell you where to find it B&M in the SFBA, but there's plenty of
    places online to get it from including direct from the manufacturer (which
    you probably already know). Or you could call or email them and ask who
    distributes it locally: http://www.wbspice.com/

    Jinx



  7. #7
    A Moose In Love Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    On Jul 13, 9:43*pm, "Jinx Minx" <jinxmi...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "sf" <s...@geemail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 10:40:20 -0700, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >> sf wrote:

    >
    > >> > I love Grandma's chili powder but haven't been able to find it for a
    > >> > while. *Well, I finally figured out what the problem is - Grandma's
    > >> > was discontinued as of 12-09. *Too bad, it was my favorite chili
    > >> > powder. *Gebhardt's is such a distant second it wasn't in the running.
    > >> > I found a blog that talked about Grandma's demise and it had a pointer
    > >> > to a replacement recipe. *So here it is for those who are Grandma's
    > >> > brand chili powder fans too.

    >
    > >> That's bad news, though it must have been 30 years
    > >> since I bought my last jar. *I used to buy it
    > >> regularly, mostly for home-made tortilla chips.

    >
    > >>http://lawmama.blogspot.com/2009/07/...grandmas-chili....

    >
    > >> As I recall, it had excellent balance of the ingredients.
    > >> I'm surprised that it would not have enough sales
    > >> to remain a viable product.

    >
    > > I'm disappointed, but not surprised. *Corporations often do things I
    > > don't agree with that apparently are better for their bottom line. *My
    > > game plan is to keep an eye out for Wayzata Chili Powder and see how
    > > that tastes. *So far, I'm coming up with nothing in the SFBA. *If
    > > you're familiar with the brand and know where to buy it in a brick and
    > > mortar store around here - please let me know.

    >
    > > --
    > > Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

    >
    > It's actual name is Wayzata Bay. *That might help you find it easier. *I
    > can't tell you where to find it B&M in the SFBA, but there's plenty of
    > places online to get it from including direct from the manufacturer (which
    > you probably already know). *Or you could call or email them and ask who
    > distributes it locally: *http://www.wbspice.com/
    >
    > Jinx- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    i dry my own peppers. i call them peppers; not chilis. i string them
    together and hang them at a close distance to my furnace.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 20:43:02 -0500, "Jinx Minx" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > It's actual name is Wayzata Bay. That might help you find it easier. I
    > can't tell you where to find it B&M in the SFBA, but there's plenty of
    > places online to get it from including direct from the manufacturer (which
    > you probably already know). Or you could call or email them and ask who
    > distributes it locally: http://www.wbspice.com/
    >

    Thanks, Jinx. I found lots of places selling it online including that
    one before I posted. I don't order online because postage kills any
    illusion of a decent price and I'm not that desperate. I'll just make
    my own mix.


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder


    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I love Grandma's chili powder but haven't been able to find it for a
    > while. Well, I finally figured out what the problem is - Grandma's
    > was discontinued as of 12-09. Too bad, it was my favorite chili
    > powder. Gebhardt's is such a distant second it wasn't in the running.
    > I found a blog that talked about Grandma's demise and it had a pointer
    > to a replacement recipe. So here it is for those who are Grandma's
    > brand chili powder fans too.
    >
    > Note: I can buy the chilie's listed below at the supermarket in
    > blister packs (ground), so I'll do that and skip the hunting for whole
    > chilies and pulverizing them part.


    I've studied and grown many varieties of chiles, won awards for what I've
    grown, and incorporated them into many varied recipes. (Ancho-chocolate chip
    cookies, for example!)

    I understand the convenience part of the fast version of the recipe, but if
    you'll grind your own chiles and spices as recommended, you'll probaby agree
    that the first recipe is far superior. Nothing makes chiles lose their
    potency and flavor faster than grinding them up and packaging them in a
    light-admitting container. Toasting the chiles to fragrance before combining
    or reconstituting in a liquid (salsa) or recipe is an important part of
    getting maximum flavor out of a dried chile pepper.

    Mexican oregano is an interesting animal. You will sometimes find dittany of
    crete crosslabeled as mexican oregano. It's not. It's nasty tasting and has
    no culinary value. When I tried to buy "mexican oregano" at my favorite
    supplier, Planters Seed Company in KC, they tell me that their standard
    everyday oregano is mexican oregano, per the label on the shipping bags,
    "product of Mexico". Hmmm.

    There is a separate botanical name for the product often called Mexican
    Oregano. Wiki ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregano ) says it's not of the
    genus oreganum at all.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregano..._.22oregano.22 and
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Oregano
    This information combined with the confusion at the herb dealer tells me
    that unless the product is labeled with it's scientific name in addition to
    the common name, you can't really be sure what it is.

    The recipe <clipped for brevity> calls for a good blend of peppers, but I
    would add that for heat, along with a smoky flavor, you can use dried ground
    chipotle instead of cayenne or (more authentically) de arbol.

    The way they describe toasting the chiles in the recipe sounds like too much
    (toasting) heat to me. My experience with dried chiles is that it's best to
    simply toast them in a hot skillet until they become fragrant and soften up.
    The method described in the recipe is likely to result in a burnt flavor and
    even slightly softened by the skillet method, they will grind up just fine.
    Then toast the cumin as the recipe recommends. However, again, a grinder
    will work, a mortar and pestle is unnecessary. I just use a coffee grinder
    (not the same one I use for coffee of course).

    MartyB in KC



  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I understand the convenience part of the fast version of
    > the recipe, but if you'll grind your own chiles and spices
    > as recommended, you'll probaby agree that the first recipe
    > is far superior. Nothing makes chiles lose their potency and
    > flavor faster than grinding them up and packaging them in a
    > light-admitting container.


    So far so good.

    > Toasting the chiles to fragrance before combining or
    > reconstituting in a liquid (salsa) or recipe is an important
    > part of getting maximum flavor out of a dried chile pepper.


    Are you saying there must be a liquid element in order
    to get maximal flavor?

    If so, I disagree, because many approach involve simply
    sauteeing the chili powder along with vegetables and/or meat.
    I suppose though there is small amount of liquidity in these
    other ingredients.

    Simmering _chile molido_ in a liquid is one approach, but
    only one of several approaches.

    Steve

  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder


    Steve Pope <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I understand the convenience part of the fast version of
    >> the recipe, but if you'll grind your own chiles and spices
    >> as recommended, you'll probaby agree that the first recipe
    >> is far superior. Nothing makes chiles lose their potency and
    >> flavor faster than grinding them up and packaging them in a
    >> light-admitting container.

    >
    > So far so good.
    >
    >> Toasting the chiles to fragrance before combining or
    >> reconstituting in a liquid (salsa) or recipe is an important
    >> part of getting maximum flavor out of a dried chile pepper.

    >
    > Are you saying there must be a liquid element in order
    > to get maximal flavor?


    No. It said liquid, or a recipe, where recipe refers to previous posting
    suggesting that one just add the ingredient of chile powder to a recpie
    instead of a chile powder preparation. What I am saying is that if you want
    maximum flavor you should toast the chiles before grinding or
    reconstituting.

    >
    > If so, I disagree, because many approach involve simply
    > sauteeing the chili powder along with vegetables and/or meat.
    > I suppose though there is small amount of liquidity in these
    > other ingredients.


    Sautee chile powder? Only if you like the flavor of bitter burnt stuff. IMO
    the only time chiles should be subjected to direct higher heat is when they
    are being roasted and peeled, or when whole peppers with thicker flesh like
    jalapenos or serranos are being roasted for fire roasted salsa. If a recipe
    calls for browned or sauteed meat or vegetable and chile powder or liquid
    chile base, I put it in after the browning stage, or after any liquids go
    in, or if none of the above applies, towards the very end of cooking. .

    MartyB in KC



  12. #12
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Pope <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> Are you saying there must be a liquid element in order
    >> to get maximal flavor?


    >No. It said liquid, or a recipe, where recipe refers to previous posting
    >suggesting that one just add the ingredient of chile powder to a recpie
    >instead of a chile powder preparation.


    Good, thanks.

    >What I am saying is that if you want
    >maximum flavor you should toast the chiles before grinding or
    >reconstituting.


    For sure. There is no such thing (that I know of) as
    chili powder that was not made from roasted, if not toasted,
    chilis.

    >> If so, I disagree, because many approach involve simply
    >> sauteeing the chili powder along with vegetables and/or meat.
    >> I suppose though there is small amount of liquidity in these
    >> other ingredients.


    >Sautee chile powder? Only if you like the flavor of bitter burnt stuff. IMO


    Not true. Sauteeing spices, including most chili powders, is one of
    the most valuable techniques a cook can learn (IMO).

    Under some conditoins this might produce something bitter, but
    you can avoid those conditions.

    >the only time chiles should be subjected to direct higher heat is when they
    >are being roasted and peeled, or when whole peppers with thicker flesh like
    >jalapenos or serranos are being roasted for fire roasted salsa. If a recipe
    >calls for browned or sauteed meat or vegetable and chile powder or liquid
    >chile base, I put it in after the browning stage, or after any liquids go
    >in, or if none of the above applies, towards the very end of cooking. .


    I would recommend experimenting with what I suggest.

    Steve

  13. #13
    Jinx Minx Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 13 Jul 2010 20:43:02 -0500, "Jinx Minx" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> It's actual name is Wayzata Bay. That might help you find it easier. I
    >> can't tell you where to find it B&M in the SFBA, but there's plenty of
    >> places online to get it from including direct from the manufacturer
    >> (which
    >> you probably already know). Or you could call or email them and ask who
    >> distributes it locally: http://www.wbspice.com/
    >>

    > Thanks, Jinx. I found lots of places selling it online including that
    > one before I posted. I don't order online because postage kills any
    > illusion of a decent price and I'm not that desperate. I'll just make
    > my own mix.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.


    It'd definitely be worth a phone call though to ask! Failing that, I'd then
    search for free shipping/discount codes online for any web stores that carry
    it. I hardly ever buy anything online and have to pay for shipping too.
    Wayzata Bay is actually a local manufacturer to me, but I've never tried
    their products. Most of my spices either come from Penzey's or from
    friends/family/travelers oversees directly.

    Jinx



  14. #14
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    Steve Pope <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>Sautee chile powder? Only if you like the flavor of bitter burnt stuff. IMO

    >
    >Not true. Sauteeing spices, including most chili powders, is one of
    >the most valuable techniques a cook can learn (IMO).


    >Under some conditoins this might produce something bitter, but
    >you can avoid those conditions.



    I'd just like to add, that if one is using a chili powder
    blend that includes garlic, then OF COURSE it will turn bitter
    when you sautee it. This is another reason not to use these
    blasted blends.

    New Mexico _chile molido_ does not turn bitter when sauteed
    under most conditions. You normally want to sautee it with
    the vegetables and meat when forming a chili dish, then
    add some vinegar or maybe tomato after this step.

    IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    type dish.

    Steve

  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 07:12:25 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    >
    > I'd just like to add, that if one is using a chili powder
    > blend that includes garlic, then OF COURSE it will turn bitter
    > when you sautee it. This is another reason not to use these
    > blasted blends.
    >
    > New Mexico _chile molido_ does not turn bitter when sauteed
    > under most conditions. You normally want to sautee it with
    > the vegetables and meat when forming a chili dish, then
    > add some vinegar or maybe tomato after this step.
    >
    > IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    > type dish.
    >
    > Steve


    i usually use cider vinegar.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Vinegar with Chiles

    blake demurred with Steve:

    >> IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    >> type dish.

    >
    > i usually use cider vinegar.


    I've used many kinds of vinegar, depending on the type of chile and what it
    will accompany. If I'm using chimayo chiles, I use apple cider vinegar,
    pretty much regardless of what it's with. If it's going to accompany a heavy
    dish I usually use red wine vinegar. If it's accompanying seafood, I will
    use coconut vinegar, white wine vinegar, rice vinegar, or champagne vinegar.
    For poultry or pork I sometimes use a mixture of red wine vinegar and sherry
    vinegar, or I might use apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. I don't
    think there are really any hard-and-fast rules.

    Bob




  17. #17
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Vinegar with Chiles

    Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >blake demurred with Steve:


    >>> IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    >>> type dish.


    >> i usually use cider vinegar.


    >I've used many kinds of vinegar, depending on the type of chile and what it
    >will accompany. If I'm using chimayo chiles, I use apple cider vinegar,
    >pretty much regardless of what it's with. If it's going to accompany a heavy
    >dish I usually use red wine vinegar. If it's accompanying seafood, I will
    >use coconut vinegar, white wine vinegar, rice vinegar, or champagne vinegar.
    >For poultry or pork I sometimes use a mixture of red wine vinegar and sherry
    >vinegar, or I might use apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. I don't
    >think there are really any hard-and-fast rules.


    Yep, lots of vinegars work. I also like cider vinegar in chilis,
    but I often have trouble finding a really good cider vinegar.
    Whereas reasonably good red wine vinegar is not too hard
    to come across.

    Tamales also deserve vinegar. I like taking a piping hot tamale,
    sprinkling it with NM chile powder, and droppering a little
    vinegar on it, causing the chili powder to sort of permeate
    into the tamale. Really good.

    Steve

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Make your own Chili Powder

    On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 11:12:08 -0400, blake murphy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 07:12:25 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    > > type dish.
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    > i usually use cider vinegar.


    I tried that the last time I made chili. Must have used too much even
    though I thought it was just a little splash, because I did *not* like
    the resulting flavor.

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Vinegar with Chiles

    On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 09:56:04 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > blake demurred with Steve:
    >
    >>> IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    >>> type dish.

    >>
    >> i usually use cider vinegar.

    >
    > I've used many kinds of vinegar, depending on the type of chile and what it
    > will accompany. If I'm using chimayo chiles, I use apple cider vinegar,
    > pretty much regardless of what it's with. If it's going to accompany a heavy
    > dish I usually use red wine vinegar. If it's accompanying seafood, I will
    > use coconut vinegar, white wine vinegar, rice vinegar, or champagne vinegar.
    > For poultry or pork I sometimes use a mixture of red wine vinegar and sherry
    > vinegar, or I might use apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. I don't
    > think there are really any hard-and-fast rules.
    >
    > Bob


    i have half-a-dozen vinegars too. but cider is what i use in chili.

    your pal,
    blake

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Vinegar with Chiles

    On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 17:49:38 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >>blake demurred with Steve:

    >
    >>>> IMO red wine vinegar is correct, for nearly any chili
    >>>> type dish.

    >
    >>> i usually use cider vinegar.

    >
    >>I've used many kinds of vinegar, depending on the type of chile and what it
    >>will accompany. If I'm using chimayo chiles, I use apple cider vinegar,
    >>pretty much regardless of what it's with. If it's going to accompany a heavy
    >>dish I usually use red wine vinegar. If it's accompanying seafood, I will
    >>use coconut vinegar, white wine vinegar, rice vinegar, or champagne vinegar.
    >>For poultry or pork I sometimes use a mixture of red wine vinegar and sherry
    >>vinegar, or I might use apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar. I don't
    >>think there are really any hard-and-fast rules.

    >
    > Yep, lots of vinegars work. I also like cider vinegar in chilis,
    > but I often have trouble finding a really good cider vinegar.


    the stuff i use is not artisanal (if that's what you mean and such a thing
    exists). there's a local (i think) brand on the east coast called 'white
    house.' i don't think there's anything wrong with heinz (except for being
    more expensive), and what i have right now is a store brand.

    your pal,
    blake

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32