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Thread: Lunch box

  1. #1
    Cosimo Guest

    Default Lunch box

    Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo



  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    In article <497c92dc$0$843$[email protected]>,
    "Cosimo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo


    I'm American.

    Many do sandwiches. I personally do mostly salads and occasionally
    leftovers from dinner which could be just about anything. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Any ship can be a minesweeper. Once." -- Anonymous

  3. #3
    MaryL Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box


    "Cosimo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:497c92dc$0$843$[email protected]. .
    > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating
    > at work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to
    > have your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your
    > Cosimo
    >


    I'm American and retired in August. I always carried my lunch and ate in my
    office. We did have a small microwave, so I sometimes took soup or
    leftovers. Most often, though, I took items that did not need any
    cooking--staples for me were salads, raw veggies (cauliflower and broccoli
    florets, mini carrots, etc.), apples, bananas, cheese, and almonds. I kept
    a small jar of peanut butter in my desk. I would spread a little on an
    apple for a mid-afternoon snack and sometimes just ate a couple of spoonsful
    right out of the jar.

    MaryL


  4. #4
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box


    "Cosimo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:497c92dc$0$843$[email protected]. .
    > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating
    > at work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to
    > have your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your
    > Cosimo
    >


    I cook dinner the night before and have leftovers for lunch. At work we
    have a microwave to heat it up. I also keep a couple of frozen dinners in
    the freezer in case I don't have a lunch to take or forget to take it.

    I can go out to lunch, but I choose to stay and eat. It is convenient,
    economical, and I enjoy the conversation with my co-workers on a variety of
    topics. We usually take 30 to 45 minutes, sometimes a little more. Once in
    a while we'll enjoy a bottle of wine and relax a bit longer.

    As for commuting home, It takes me 35 minutes each way so that is not
    practical. Last place I worked took only six minutes and some days I would
    go home.



  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Cosimo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    > work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    > your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo


    Every company has at least a microwave. Some places may have
    toaster ovens, but these are rare as they are a liability (heck,
    they even keep the coffee makers from overflowing or burning the
    popcorn). Some places have full kitchens, but are only used for
    special events. Besides, it's a well known fact here that American
    workers will not wash their dishes.

    If you're asking what we eat for lunch, sandwiches. leftovers, and
    salads. Pretty much and anything everything we eat at home except.

    -sw

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I can go out to lunch, but I choose to stay and eat. It is convenient,
    > economical, and I enjoy the conversation with my co-workers on a variety of
    > topics. We usually take 30 to 45 minutes, sometimes a little more. Once in
    > a while we'll enjoy a bottle of wine and relax a bit longer.


    You work at an employer that allows you to BYOB for lunch and drink
    it there? That's pretty rare these days.

    My employer had to buy extra insurance just to be able to serve
    booze at the Christmas party.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Cosimo wrote:
    > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    > work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    > your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo
    >
    >



    It is very hard to speak for all Americans since we are from so many
    ethnic groups and that sometimes influences what we like to eat.

    In general, I have seen people bring for lunch things like:

    leftover meat and vegetables from last night's dinner
    leftover food from a restaurant meal
    soup
    stew
    chili
    green salad
    fruit salad
    cheese, fruit, with bread or crackers
    sandwiches of all kinds
    tacos, burritos, carnitas
    other ethnic foods
    special diet food or drink
    commercially frozen meals
    canned or packaged foods

    I am sure I have left out many options.

    gloria p

  8. #8
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    In article <vv64jblz2db7$.[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I can go out to lunch, but I choose to stay and eat. It is convenient,
    > > economical, and I enjoy the conversation with my co-workers on a variety of
    > > topics. We usually take 30 to 45 minutes, sometimes a little more. Once
    > > in
    > > a while we'll enjoy a bottle of wine and relax a bit longer.

    >
    > You work at an employer that allows you to BYOB for lunch and drink
    > it there? That's pretty rare these days.


    I'm not sure, but I seem to remember that Ed owns the company.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  9. #9
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Cosimo wrote:
    >> Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on
    >> eating at work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent
    >> common rooms to have your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    >> Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know
    >> what americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box.
    >> Your Cosimo
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > It is very hard to speak for all Americans since we are from so many
    > ethnic groups and that sometimes influences what we like to eat.
    >


    It's very similar for Australians. I have noted that many of the people
    at work of Indian, Sri Lankan or Chinese origin usually have hot meals
    for lunch as well as dinner. The lunch room often smells wonderful!

    I have taken a variety of foods over the years

    sandwiches
    single serve tin of soup and bread roll or English muffin
    small tins of flavoured tuna or salmon and bread roll or flat breads
    salads with small container of dressing
    left overs from dinner the night before
    when I'm particularly well organised I make soup and freeze small single
    serve containers to take
    small tins of (or small container of home made) baked beans and some
    type of bread

    I need to restock my drawers at work - I try to keep some small tins of
    soup or tuna and crackers etc. there so that if I race out of the house
    without time to put my lunch together I have something and don't have to
    buy lunch - while there are healthy options invariably I end up getting
    hot chips or something unhealthy. Or I miss the person going to the
    shops, don't have time to go up myself and end up lunching on a packet
    of chips from the vending machine. Some of the vending machines also
    have cup noodles - not much healthier than the chips :-)


    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

  10. #10
    Jo Anne Slaven Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    >Cosimo wrote:
    >> Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    >> work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    >> your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    >> Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    >> americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo


    Back when my husband and I were working, he *hated* to have to go out
    and buy his lunch. It had to be something from home. Preferably
    leftover hot stuff.

    When I made his favourite foods for dinner, I'd always cook extra and
    freeze it in single-serving portions in little fridge containers. (He
    especially liked stuff like cabbage rolls, lasagne, pot roast, etc.)
    So most days we didn't have to actually make anything for his lunch.

    If there wasn't anything suitable in the fridge/freezer, he'd "make
    do" with a couple of sandwiches - egg salad, tuna, salmon, or
    occasionally peanut butter in an emergency.

    In addition to the main course, his lunches always had juice, a piece
    of fruit, and some kind of dessert or sweet. Banana bread, a muffin,
    a fridge container with leftover apple crisp or pie, homemade pudding,
    or something similar.

    For my lunches, I used to usually go to the deli and get a sandwich.
    :-)

    Jo Anne



  11. #11
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If you're asking what we eat for lunch, sandwiches. leftovers, and
    > salads. Pretty much and anything everything we eat at home except.


    ....except... I don't know. I was trying to think of something I've
    never taken to work, so I left that part blank for the readers
    imagination. I've even took the makings for crispy tacos one day
    (once in grade school and again just a week weeks ago).

    -sw

  12. #12
    Linda Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    On Jan 25, 10:27´┐Żam, "Cosimo" <c.t...@katamail.com> wrote:
    > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eatingat
    > work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    > your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo


    I'm at a job now where I don't have time to go to the microwave and
    heat up-so I need stuff I can eat at room temperature a bite at a
    time.

    My favorite things are : pita's stuffed with lettuce, red pepper,
    cukes and feta cheese (I'd like red onions-but I have a retail job..)-
    I bring a small container of Greek or Italian salad dressing and dress
    it at work.

    I also like either bagels or English muffins with cold cuts and cheese
    on them.


  13. #13
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    On Sun, 25 Jan 2009 18:31:19 -0800 (PST), Linda <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >My favorite things are : pita's stuffed with lettuce, red pepper,
    >cukes and feta cheese (I'd like red onions-but I have a retail job..)-
    >I bring a small container of Greek or Italian salad dressing and dress
    >it at work.


    Oh, that sounds good. I will have to remember that idea.

    I too, have a job where sometimes I don't have time to heat something
    up, and if I want to eat something during a long 12 hour shift, I have
    to do it in snatches like that. I will have to find some pita breads
    this week....

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  14. #14
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box


    "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <vv64jblz2db7$.[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > I can go out to lunch, but I choose to stay and eat. It is convenient,
    >> > economical, and I enjoy the conversation with my co-workers on a
    >> > variety of
    >> > topics. We usually take 30 to 45 minutes, sometimes a little more.
    >> > Once
    >> > in
    >> > a while we'll enjoy a bottle of wine and relax a bit longer.

    >>
    >> You work at an employer that allows you to BYOB for lunch and drink
    >> it there? That's pretty rare these days.

    >
    > I'm not sure, but I seem to remember that Ed owns the company.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > Petaluma, California USA
    > [email protected]


    I don't own it, but I do run it. We have a well equipped break room,
    including wine glasses. It is not uncommon to have an espresso with a
    little sambuca or amaretto either. No one chugs a six pack at their desk
    though. Discretion and moderation.



  15. #15
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box


    "Linda" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    I'm at a job now where I don't have time to go to the microwave and
    heat up-so I need stuff I can eat at room temperature a bite at a
    time.

    ************************************************** ******************

    That is sad. Everyone should have a little break and comfortable lunch.
    You work better, you feel better, you enjoy life more. Do you have to pee
    in a jar too or can you go to the restroom?



  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    On Sun, 25 Jan 2009 22:36:02 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Linda" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >I'm at a job now where I don't have time to go to the microwave and
    >heat up-so I need stuff I can eat at room temperature a bite at a
    >time.
    >
    >************************************************* *******************
    >
    >That is sad. Everyone should have a little break and comfortable lunch.
    >You work better, you feel better, you enjoy life more.


    I wish that were true for everyone. My profession (nursing) is so
    shortstaffed much of the time, we ARE very lucky some days to even get
    a bit of time to eat something.

    And I have worked some days where a bathroom break was a luxury.
    Simply because it was so busy.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Rhonda wrote:

    > I have noted that many of the people at work of Indian, Sri Lankan or
    > Chinese origin usually have hot meals for lunch as well as dinner.


    Are you familiar with the "tiffin" custom?

    Bob


  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Linda <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jan 25, 10:27?am, "Cosimo" <c.t...@katamail.com> wrote:
    > > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    > > work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    > > your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo

    >
    > I'm at a job now where I don't have time to go to the microwave and
    > heat up-so I need stuff I can eat at room temperature a bite at a
    > time.
    >
    > My favorite things are : pita's stuffed with lettuce, red pepper,
    > cukes and feta cheese (I'd like red onions-but I have a retail job..)-
    > I bring a small container of Greek or Italian salad dressing and dress
    > it at work.
    >
    > I also like either bagels or English muffins with cold cuts and cheese
    > on them.


    If you like pita's, try stuffing them with sprouts sometime. :-d
    Sunflower sprouts are especially yummy imho.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Any ship can be a minesweeper. Once." -- Anonymous

  19. #19
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box



    Cosimo wrote:
    >
    > Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    > work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    > your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    > Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    > americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo


    Depends. Many people take sandwiches or salads that don't need warming
    up. If there a microwave then the leftovers from last night's dinner.
    When I worked in labs, obviously couldn't eat there, but an electric
    kettle at the desk is good for all sorts of lunch things Some places
    did have a break room of sorts but many didn't, or else they were too
    far away to bother going and coming back.

  20. #20
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Lunch box

    Arri London wrote:

    >
    > Cosimo wrote:
    >
    >>Thanks a lot to all friend who so quickly answered my questions on eating at
    >>work. It's so different here in Italy where you havent common rooms to have
    >>your lunch if you cant commute home for that.
    >>Waiting for other attestations, if possible, I'd also like to know what
    >>americans, canadians, australians use to cook for the lunch box. Your Cosimo

    >
    >
    > Depends. Many people take sandwiches or salads that don't need warming
    > up. If there a microwave then the leftovers from last night's dinner.
    > When I worked in labs, obviously couldn't eat there, but an electric
    > kettle at the desk is good for all sorts of lunch things Some places
    > did have a break room of sorts but many didn't, or else they were too
    > far away to bother going and coming back.


    One of the joys of working in San Francisco or across the bay in
    Berkeley was the abundance of good restaurants to take lunch in.
    However on occasion i would have made something so good at home that i
    would be greedy and take it to lunch the next day.
    Several times i have packed meat loaf sandwiches for myself, often took
    a pasta salad, and of course i would routinely brew up a pot of coffee,
    put it in a thermos and take with me to avoid the long lines at the
    various coffee shops.

    I found i had to beg off of 'working lunches' a couple of times i
    agreed to go with other employees to 'lunch' at some sit down, full meal
    place with a bar and by the time i got back to work i was wasted. And
    not just from having the seemingly routine 3 martini's but a big plate
    of hot food tends to knock me right out.

    Used to be a little restaurant in the union square area of SF that made
    an absolutely delicious moussaka, they served it with all the trimmings
    & a side of garlic bread, it got so i would order a double portion and
    eat it all! eventually i got to the point where i would call ahead just
    before quitting time and order it 'to go' and take it home for dinner

    God forbid i should ever live and work in Rome or Paris!
    --
    JL


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