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Thread: Looking for a Copycat

  1. #1
    Alan Holbrook Guest

    Default Looking for a Copycat

    OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But I'm
    very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and their cole
    slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent a fair amount of
    time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two dishes, but with no
    luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have copycat recipes for either
    of these? And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?

    TIA...

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    > recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?


    I don't even know what bbq baked bean are. My favorite style is
    Boston Baked Beans. I used to make them from scratch and then I
    realize that canned baked beans were almost exactly the way I make
    them (B&M back then, but even Bush's are fine), so I just buy the can
    since I'm the only one who likes baked beans. As far as creamy
    coleslaw is concerned, I like KFC's - so if I was making slaw for a
    crowd (something I don't do), I'd use a copycat KFC recipe. Isn't the
    secret ingredient vinegar? I've used the dry coleslaw dressing mix
    that comes in a package and was found in the produce aisle - haven't
    seen it in years though. It might be found in with the commercial
    salad dressings, but I don't look in that section anymore - so I don't
    know if it still exists or not.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  3. #3
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But I'm
    >very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and their cole
    >slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent a fair amount of
    >time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two dishes, but with no
    >luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have copycat recipes for either
    >of these? And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    >recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?
    >
    >TIA...




    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Old Fashioned Baked Beans

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Beans

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    2 cups great northern beans
    5 cups water
    1 small onion -- finely chopped
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 pound bacon -- * see note

    1/4 cup molasses
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    1 teaspoon dry mustard
    1/4 cup catsup
    3/4 cup bean liquid -- (3/4 to 1)

    Wash and sort beans, then place in bean pot. Add water, salt, onions
    and meat.

    Cook in bean pot about 9 to 10 hours. (This is very low heat.)

    Drain beans, add seasonings and bean liquids as desired. Blend well.
    Plug in bean pot 1 to 2 hours before serving. (or set in very low
    oven.)

    Yield:
    "2 quarts"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 286 Calories; 8g Fat (23.5%
    calories from fat); 15g Protein; 41g Carbohydrate; 10g Dietary Fiber;
    12mg Cholesterol; 731mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean
    Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

    NOTES : Fat bacon or fresh pork cut in pieces.

    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

    If you don't have a bean pot, any pot will do and put them in the oven
    on a low heat.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook wrote:

    > OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But I'm
    > very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and their cole
    > slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent a fair amount of
    > time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two dishes, but with no
    > luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have copycat recipes for either
    > of these? And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    > recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?


    Looking at their nutrition guide, nearly 80% of the menu items have
    more than 100% of the USRDA of sodium. A rack of baby backs will cost
    you almost 300% of the USRDA of both fat and sodium.

    http://smokeybones.com/public/nutrition/

    Many BBQ restaurants simply use one of their house BBQ sauces mixed
    with canned pinto beans with added onions (or onion powder) and/or
    tomato paste.

    -sw

  5. #5
    bigwheel Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    'Alan Holbrook[_5_ Wrote:
    > ;1860168']OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey
    > Bones. But I'm
    > very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and their
    > cole
    > slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent a fair amount
    > of
    > time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two dishes, but with no
    >
    > luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have copycat recipes for
    > either
    > of these? And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    > recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?
    >
    > TIA...


    (For doctored up canned beans this one is hard to beat)

    Baked Beans (ala Boss Hawg's BBQ Topeka, Kansas)

    1 Gallon can of Bush's Baked beans
    1 big chopped onion
    1 cup dark brown sugar (or to taste)
    4 or 5 strips cooked bacon
    1 cup bbq sauce
    3 or 4 peeled and chopped Granny Smith Apples (*or a can of apple pie
    filling)
    1 handful golden raisins

    Open the can of beans and pour off 1 cup of the liquid. Replace the
    missing liquid with a cup of whutever bbq sauce you want. Mix well along
    with the cooked bacon..chopped onyawns..brown sugar..apples and raisins.
    Put in a big disposable Sams pan and cook on the pit without a lid till
    everything gets nice and bubbly and it forms a crust on top and the
    apples get done. Another variant of the recipe can be found at the link
    below which that one could possibly be the original but it calls for
    Pork n' Beans so it might take mo brown sugar on that one which would
    seem to logical if a person used unsweetened beans. According to Big
    Dave a person can't really tell if its a side dish or dessert. Now he do
    say folks eat it up like a hawg eats slop and it is cheaper than meat.

    (This is Danny Gaulden's Garlic Coleslaw Recipe..its very good)

    Danny Gaulden's Garlic Cole Slaw
    Danny Gaulden's Coleslaw With Garlic

    Dressing
    1 quart mayonnaise
    1 1/4 cups white sugar
    1/4 cup French's yellow mustard
    2/3 cup apple cider vinegar
    2 1/4 teaspoons salt
    1/2 teaspoon white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    3 cloves garlic -- medium size
    1 squeeze fresh lemon juice
    Dry Ingredients
    2 small heads green cabbage
    3 large carrots
    1 small head red cabbage
    1 bunch green onions

    Here's the "cole slaw with garlic" recipe that we use at the store. Have
    tried to reconstruct it to a home size portion. Hope this works for you
    and that you will add it to your "good recipe" list.

    Mix all the above dressing ingredients, except for the garlic, together
    in a large bowl or mixer. Take a cup of the now made dressing and put in
    a blender with the garlic cloves and blend until the garlic is pureed.
    Pour this portion of the dressing back into the main bowl of dressing
    and stir till well blended. Cover and place in refrigerator for at least
    3 or 4 hours to give the dressing time to blend flavors.

    Shred green cabbage and place in separate bowl. Grate carrots, dice
    green onions till very fine, and shred 1/3 to 1/2 of th red cabbage.
    Place each of these into a separate bowl also. Now put as much of the
    prepared green cabbage as you think you will eat into a large bowl and
    mix the carrots, green onions, and red cabbage, one at a time and by the
    hand full into the green cabbage until the desired color is attained,
    and the slaw looks fairly "busy". Add dressing SLOWLY and stir. When it
    is at the wetness level you want, cover and let stand in refrigerator
    for at least 15 minutes. The colder it is kept, the better.

    The garlic in this recipe is suppose to be the "secret ingredient", due
    to the way it was originally intended to be used. That is, not enough of
    it to single it out, but if used properly, it would leave all of your
    guests wondering what you had in your slaw that gave it that special,
    superb flavor. When used in this respect, it can make your slaw taste
    like you have added a hundred great things to it.However, if you are a
    garlic lover, then add as much of it as your little heart desires. I
    don't have to sleep with you (ha).




    --
    bigwheel

  6. #6
    Alan Holbrook Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    The Cook <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But
    >>I'm very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and
    >>their cole slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent
    >>a fair amount of time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two
    >>dishes, but with no luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have
    >>copycat recipes for either of these? And barring that, anyone care to
    >>recommend a bbq baked bean recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe
    >>they're fond of?
    >>
    >>TIA...

    >
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Old Fashioned Baked Beans
    >
    > Recipe By :
    > Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : Beans
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 2 cups great northern beans
    > 5 cups water
    > 1 small onion -- finely chopped
    > 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    > 1/4 pound bacon -- * see note
    >
    > 1/4 cup molasses
    > 2 tablespoons brown sugar
    > 1 teaspoon dry mustard
    > 1/4 cup catsup
    > 3/4 cup bean liquid -- (3/4 to 1)
    >
    > Wash and sort beans, then place in bean pot. Add water, salt, onions
    > and meat.
    >
    > Cook in bean pot about 9 to 10 hours. (This is very low heat.)
    >
    > Drain beans, add seasonings and bean liquids as desired. Blend well.
    > Plug in bean pot 1 to 2 hours before serving. (or set in very low
    > oven.)
    >
    > Yield:
    > "2 quarts"
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    > - -
    >
    > Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 286 Calories; 8g Fat (23.5%
    > calories from fat); 15g Protein; 41g Carbohydrate; 10g Dietary Fiber;
    > 12mg Cholesterol; 731mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean
    > Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.
    >
    > NOTES : Fat bacon or fresh pork cut in pieces.
    >
    > Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    >
    > If you don't have a bean pot, any pot will do and put them in the oven
    > on a low heat.


    Now that looks good. I have no idea if it will taste anything like
    Smokey Bones', but it does look good. I assume a crockpot on low would
    work the way a bean pot would?

    Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.

  7. #7
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But I'm
    >very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and their cole
    >slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent a fair amount of
    >time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two dishes, but with no
    >luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have copycat recipes for either
    >of these? And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    >recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?
    >
    >TIA...


    If you have a smoker, put a pan of any kind of beans in there with
    whatever meat you are smoking. Otherwise, I would think a couple of
    drops of Liquid Smoke or some prime, smoky bacon would give the flavor
    you want.
    Janet US

  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Monday, August 26, 2013 11:58:02 AM UTC-5, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >
    > Many BBQ restaurants simply use one of their house BBQ sauces mixed
    >
    > with canned pinto beans with added onions (or onion powder) and/or
    >
    > tomato paste.
    >
    >
    >
    > -sw


    True, true. And many add a bit of sugar, too.

  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    Alan Holbrook <[email protected]> wrote:
    > OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones.
    > But I'm very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans
    > and their cole slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have
    > spent a fair amount of time on the web looking for knock-offs for
    > these two dishes, but with no luck. So I thought I'd ask here.
    > Anyone have copycat recipes for either of these? And barring that,
    > anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean recipe and/or a creamy cole
    > slaw recipe they're fond of?
    >
    > TIA...


    Just doctor up some pork and beans. Add barbecue sauce, chili seasoning,
    onions, bacon, molasses, brown sugar, a bit of worcestershire sauce, a
    little heat if you like, a little liquid smoke if you like, and bits of
    barbecued meat such as burnt ends or pork shoulder. Drain off a bit of
    liquid from the can before starting.

    Cook it at 325-350 for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. The goal is to have it thicken up
    but not cook so long that the beans turn to mush.

    MartyB


  10. #10
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On 8/26/2013 2:34 PM, Alan Holbrook wrote:
    > The Cook <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But
    >>> I'm very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and
    >>> their cole slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent
    >>> a fair amount of time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two
    >>> dishes, but with no luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have
    >>> copycat recipes for either of these? And barring that, anyone care to
    >>> recommend a bbq baked bean recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe
    >>> they're fond of?
    >>>
    >>> TIA...

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> * Exported from MasterCook *
    >>
    >> Old Fashioned Baked Beans
    >>
    >> Recipe By :
    >> Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    >> Categories : Beans
    >>
    >> Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    >> -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    >> 2 cups great northern beans
    >> 5 cups water
    >> 1 small onion -- finely chopped
    >> 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    >> 1/4 pound bacon -- * see note
    >>
    >> 1/4 cup molasses
    >> 2 tablespoons brown sugar
    >> 1 teaspoon dry mustard
    >> 1/4 cup catsup
    >> 3/4 cup bean liquid -- (3/4 to 1)
    >>
    >> Wash and sort beans, then place in bean pot. Add water, salt, onions
    >> and meat.
    >>
    >> Cook in bean pot about 9 to 10 hours. (This is very low heat.)
    >>
    >> Drain beans, add seasonings and bean liquids as desired. Blend well.
    >> Plug in bean pot 1 to 2 hours before serving. (or set in very low
    >> oven.)
    >>
    >> Yield:
    >> "2 quarts"
    >> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    >> - -
    >>
    >> Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 286 Calories; 8g Fat (23.5%
    >> calories from fat); 15g Protein; 41g Carbohydrate; 10g Dietary Fiber;
    >> 12mg Cholesterol; 731mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean
    >> Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.
    >>
    >> NOTES : Fat bacon or fresh pork cut in pieces.
    >>
    >> Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    >>
    >> If you don't have a bean pot, any pot will do and put them in the oven
    >> on a low heat.

    >
    > Now that looks good. I have no idea if it will taste anything like
    > Smokey Bones', but it does look good. I assume a crockpot on low would
    > work the way a bean pot would?
    >
    > Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.
    >

    Just make sure it's not a Rival brand. Mine burned beans on "warm"
    The beans and the cooker went into the trash.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 17:30:44 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I assume a crockpot on low would
    > > work the way a bean pot would?
    > >
    > > Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.
    > >

    > Just make sure it's not a Rival brand. Mine burned beans on "warm"
    > The beans and the cooker went into the trash.


    I've been thinking maybe I should "invest" in an inexpensive crockpot
    because the best meat for tamales is done overnight in one and if I
    have multiple uses for a kitchen "want", I'm more inclined to buy it.
    I know my bean pot is "somewhere", but where? It disappeared after
    the kitchen update. Somewhere in the basement is as geographically
    close to it as I can get.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  12. #12
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 17:30:44 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I assume a crockpot on low would
    >> > work the way a bean pot would?
    >> >
    >> > Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.
    >> >

    >> Just make sure it's not a Rival brand. Mine burned beans on "warm"
    >> The beans and the cooker went into the trash.

    >
    > I've been thinking maybe I should "invest" in an inexpensive crockpot
    > because the best meat for tamales is done overnight in one and if I
    > have multiple uses for a kitchen "want", I'm more inclined to buy it.
    > I know my bean pot is "somewhere", but where? It disappeared after
    > the kitchen update. Somewhere in the basement is as geographically
    > close to it as I can get.
    >



    you could always turn your oven on low.



  13. #13
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    >> recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?

    >
    > I don't even know what bbq baked bean are. My favorite style is
    > Boston Baked Beans. I used to make them from scratch and then I
    > realize that canned baked beans were almost exactly the way I make
    > them (B&M back then, but even Bush's are fine), so I just buy the can
    > since I'm the only one who likes baked beans. As far as creamy
    > coleslaw is concerned, I like KFC's - so if I was making slaw for a
    > crowd (something I don't do), I'd use a copycat KFC recipe. Isn't the
    > secret ingredient vinegar? I've used the dry coleslaw dressing mix
    > that comes in a package and was found in the produce aisle - haven't
    > seen it in years though. It might be found in with the commercial
    > salad dressings, but I don't look in that section anymore - so I don't
    > know if it still exists or not.


    BBQ beans have a smoky, sweet BBQ type sauce in them. I don't personally
    care for that flavor at all. So I can't help with the recipe. That is one
    of the few bean types that I don't like. But I do love the Boston and other
    kinds of baked beans.

    Can't help with the slaw either because when I make it, I usually use the
    vinegar type dressing.


  14. #14
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But I'm
    >>very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and their
    >>cole
    >>slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent a fair amount
    >>of
    >>time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two dishes, but with no
    >>luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have copycat recipes for either
    >>of these? And barring that, anyone care to recommend a bbq baked bean
    >>recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe they're fond of?
    >>
    >>TIA...

    >
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Old Fashioned Baked Beans
    >
    > Recipe By :
    > Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : Beans
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 2 cups great northern beans
    > 5 cups water
    > 1 small onion -- finely chopped
    > 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    > 1/4 pound bacon -- * see note
    >
    > 1/4 cup molasses
    > 2 tablespoons brown sugar
    > 1 teaspoon dry mustard
    > 1/4 cup catsup
    > 3/4 cup bean liquid -- (3/4 to 1)
    >
    > Wash and sort beans, then place in bean pot. Add water, salt, onions
    > and meat.
    >
    > Cook in bean pot about 9 to 10 hours. (This is very low heat.)
    >
    > Drain beans, add seasonings and bean liquids as desired. Blend well.
    > Plug in bean pot 1 to 2 hours before serving. (or set in very low
    > oven.)
    >
    > Yield:
    > "2 quarts"
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    > - -
    >
    > Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 286 Calories; 8g Fat (23.5%
    > calories from fat); 15g Protein; 41g Carbohydrate; 10g Dietary Fiber;
    > 12mg Cholesterol; 731mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean
    > Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.
    >
    > NOTES : Fat bacon or fresh pork cut in pieces.
    >
    > Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    >
    > If you don't have a bean pot, any pot will do and put them in the oven
    > on a low heat.
    > --
    > Susan N.
    >
    > "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    > 48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    > Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)


    That recipe looks good and is pretty much how I would make my beans, but it
    does not have a BBQ flavor.


  15. #15
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    "Alan Holbrook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.30...
    > The Cook <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 03:48:52 -0500, Alan Holbrook <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>OK, so granted, there's a lot better 'Q around than Smokey Bones. But
    >>>I'm very fond of two of their sides, their barbecued baked beans and
    >>>their cole slaw. My research assistant, Dr. Google, and I have spent
    >>>a fair amount of time on the web looking for knock-offs for these two
    >>>dishes, but with no luck. So I thought I'd ask here. Anyone have
    >>>copycat recipes for either of these? And barring that, anyone care to
    >>>recommend a bbq baked bean recipe and/or a creamy cole slaw recipe
    >>>they're fond of?
    >>>
    >>>TIA...

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> * Exported from MasterCook *
    >>
    >> Old Fashioned Baked Beans
    >>
    >> Recipe By :
    >> Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    >> Categories : Beans
    >>
    >> Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    >> -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    >> 2 cups great northern beans
    >> 5 cups water
    >> 1 small onion -- finely chopped
    >> 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    >> 1/4 pound bacon -- * see note
    >>
    >> 1/4 cup molasses
    >> 2 tablespoons brown sugar
    >> 1 teaspoon dry mustard
    >> 1/4 cup catsup
    >> 3/4 cup bean liquid -- (3/4 to 1)
    >>
    >> Wash and sort beans, then place in bean pot. Add water, salt, onions
    >> and meat.
    >>
    >> Cook in bean pot about 9 to 10 hours. (This is very low heat.)
    >>
    >> Drain beans, add seasonings and bean liquids as desired. Blend well.
    >> Plug in bean pot 1 to 2 hours before serving. (or set in very low
    >> oven.)
    >>
    >> Yield:
    >> "2 quarts"
    >> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    >> - -
    >>
    >> Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 286 Calories; 8g Fat (23.5%
    >> calories from fat); 15g Protein; 41g Carbohydrate; 10g Dietary Fiber;
    >> 12mg Cholesterol; 731mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean
    >> Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.
    >>
    >> NOTES : Fat bacon or fresh pork cut in pieces.
    >>
    >> Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    >>
    >> If you don't have a bean pot, any pot will do and put them in the oven
    >> on a low heat.

    >
    > Now that looks good. I have no idea if it will taste anything like
    > Smokey Bones', but it does look good. I assume a crockpot on low would
    > work the way a bean pot would?
    >
    > Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.


    If you use the Crock-Pot, you want it on high for the first hour. After
    that, you can cook them for as long as you want or need to. I have left
    them in there for close to 16 hours and they were fine.


  16. #16
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    "Janet Wilder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:521bd68f$0$17001$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    > Just make sure it's not a Rival brand. Mine burned beans on "warm" The
    > beans and the cooker went into the trash.


    Mine were fine in the Rival. Have never burned anything in a Crock-Pot.


  17. #17
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 17:30:44 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I assume a crockpot on low would
    >> > work the way a bean pot would?
    >> >
    >> > Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.
    >> >

    >> Just make sure it's not a Rival brand. Mine burned beans on "warm"
    >> The beans and the cooker went into the trash.

    >
    > I've been thinking maybe I should "invest" in an inexpensive crockpot
    > because the best meat for tamales is done overnight in one and if I
    > have multiple uses for a kitchen "want", I'm more inclined to buy it.
    > I know my bean pot is "somewhere", but where? It disappeared after
    > the kitchen update. Somewhere in the basement is as geographically
    > close to it as I can get.


    Now is the time to get one. Good sales for the college kids and you can get
    cool colors!

    I have a nice looking vintage bean pot and little cups for serving but I no
    longer use it because it is too small for me. I can easily eat the amount
    of beans it contains all by myself. Heh. Yes, I am a bean pig!


  18. #18
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On Monday, August 26, 2013 1:48:52 AM UTC-7, Alan Holbrook wrote:

    Can you tell me approximately what was in the beans. Was is one kind of bean or a mixture?
    Was there any meat in there? Did they taste like a bbq sauce? I don't know if my recipe is even close but it is my favorite and has been a huge favorite with many people.

    http://www.hizzoners.com/index.php/r...al-baked-beans


    and.....having owned a restaurant and knowing what other restaurants do.....I would not put it past Smokey Bones to just use a jarred Kraft Coleslaw Dressing. Seriously. If you don't have a problem with bottled dressings try some.

  19. #19
    casa contenta Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On 8/26/2013 7:05 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 26 Aug 2013 17:30:44 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I assume a crockpot on low would
    >>> work the way a bean pot would?
    >>>
    >>> Anyhow, it's in my queue. Thanks.
    >>>

    >> Just make sure it's not a Rival brand. Mine burned beans on "warm"
    >> The beans and the cooker went into the trash.

    >
    > I've been thinking maybe I should "invest" in an inexpensive crockpot
    > because the best meat for tamales is done overnight in one and if I
    > have multiple uses for a kitchen "want", I'm more inclined to buy it.
    > I know my bean pot is "somewhere", but where? It disappeared after
    > the kitchen update. Somewhere in the basement is as geographically
    > close to it as I can get.


    The cheapest smaller model from Wal Mart will almost certainly be
    sufficient, barring that you have a large family to feed.


    http://www.walmart.com/ip/Crock-Pot-...Black/14922959
    Crock-Pot 4-Quart Slow Cooker, Black
    4.4 out of 5
    $16.58

    I mention these smaller models as they tend to have a lower output heat
    element and may cook more slowly.

    Still the best bet is any garage with an older (80s) but functional
    crockpot.

  20. #20
    casa contenta Guest

    Default Re: Looking for a Copycat

    On 8/26/2013 9:29 AM, sf wrote:
    > I don't even know what bbq baked bean are.


    It can be beans with BBQ sauce added, or a metal crock done over a
    smoker on the grate.

    This recipe is a good place to start.

    http://www.food.com/recipe/ranch-sty...oy-beans-85199

    To that I'd add 1/2 cup of my preferred BBQ sauce (home made or store
    bought)

    1 tsp. cumin

    Several shakes of liquid smoke hickory flavor

    2 tsp. Tabasco chipotle sauce.

    I'd always sub in a roasted and peeled and cut hatch pepper for the
    green, but a poblano is good as well.

    And most importantly good thick cut bacon, cubed and rendered about 6
    slices, a 1/2 cup of diced ham, or one ham hock.

    Also, if you can find them, Anasazi beans are superior!



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