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Thread: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

  1. #1
    Adam Preble Guest

    Default Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    I have some real buttermilk for once and want to make a buttermilk pie
    from it. I am having a hard time finding a good buttermilk chess pie
    custard that would do the job. Most recipes are overboard on the sugar
    and butter, to the point that it is overwhelming. Another issue is that
    they often call for 2-3 eggs, and the taste of some of those pies is more
    of egg than anything else.

    Perhaps my technique is a little off in making the pie, but the butter
    often sinks through the crust on the bottom, leaving it so greasy that it
    is wet. The top gets a nice crust, but that's about the only
    distinguishing feature.

    Does anybody have a good buttermilk pie recipe that isn't so
    overwhelming? Does anybody have tips on the custard to make for a better
    pie?

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    On Sun 20 Apr 2008 06:33:50p, Adam Preble told us...

    > I have some real buttermilk for once and want to make a buttermilk pie
    > from it. I am having a hard time finding a good buttermilk chess pie
    > custard that would do the job. Most recipes are overboard on the sugar
    > and butter, to the point that it is overwhelming. Another issue is that
    > they often call for 2-3 eggs, and the taste of some of those pies is more
    > of egg than anything else.
    >
    > Perhaps my technique is a little off in making the pie, but the butter
    > often sinks through the crust on the bottom, leaving it so greasy that it
    > is wet. The top gets a nice crust, but that's about the only
    > distinguishing feature.
    >
    > Does anybody have a good buttermilk pie recipe that isn't so
    > overwhelming? Does anybody have tips on the custard to make for a better
    > pie?


    It doesn't seem to me that you really want a chess pie at all. Chess pie,
    by its very nature, is rich with butter, sugar, and eggs. Granted some
    have slightly less, but none have small amounts. My usual chess pie,
    albeit not buttermilk, has a 1/2 cup butter, 8 egg yolks, 2 cups of sugar,
    and 1-1/2 cups cream or evaporated milk. It also includes 1 tablespoon of
    cornmeal and 2 tablespoon of flour.

    I've poked around on the web for just "buttermilk pie" and most are almost
    as rich as that. Eggs are definitely required to thicken the custard
    unless you're going the unpleasant route of using a significant amount of
    starche.

    If you do indeed want a chess pie, it may very well be you technique in
    making it and baking it.

    First off, whatever recipe you use, the mixture should *never* be beaten,
    not even the eggs. The eggs should be well broken and yolks and whites
    gently encorporated with each other to avoid introducing air. The butter
    should be melted and combined thoroughly with the sugar, followed by the
    addition of the well mixed eggs. Lastly, the buttermilk or cream should be
    added. The mixture should be gently combined with a whisk without the
    usual quick "whisking" motion. Even after all the mixing, I usually allow
    the mixture to stand at room temperature for at least an hour, occasionally
    stirring to keep everything incorporated.

    It helps, too, to prebake the pastry and allow it to thoroughly cool. The
    edge should then be protected with foil when it's returned to the oven to
    bake the filling. My best results have been baking at 375F. for 50-60
    minutes, or until the filling is thoroughly set. I also "tent" the entire
    pie to prevent over-browning of the top. The tent can be removed near the
    end if the top isn't as brown as you'd like.

    HTH

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 04(IV)/20(XX)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    5wks 4hrs 35mins
    -------------------------------------------
    You have to stay in shape. My
    grandmother started walking five miles
    a day when she was 60. Now she's 97
    and we don't know *where* the hell she

  3. #3
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    On Sun 20 Apr 2008 06:33:50p, Adam Preble told us...

    > I have some real buttermilk for once and want to make a buttermilk pie
    > from it. I am having a hard time finding a good buttermilk chess pie
    > custard that would do the job. Most recipes are overboard on the sugar
    > and butter, to the point that it is overwhelming. Another issue is that
    > they often call for 2-3 eggs, and the taste of some of those pies is more
    > of egg than anything else.
    >
    > Perhaps my technique is a little off in making the pie, but the butter
    > often sinks through the crust on the bottom, leaving it so greasy that it
    > is wet. The top gets a nice crust, but that's about the only
    > distinguishing feature.
    >
    > Does anybody have a good buttermilk pie recipe that isn't so
    > overwhelming? Does anybody have tips on the custard to make for a better
    > pie?


    It doesn't seem to me that you really want a chess pie at all. Chess pie,
    by its very nature, is rich with butter, sugar, and eggs. Granted some
    have slightly less, but none have small amounts. My usual chess pie,
    albeit not buttermilk, has a 1/2 cup butter, 8 egg yolks, 2 cups of sugar,
    and 1-1/2 cups cream or evaporated milk. It also includes 1 tablespoon of
    cornmeal and 2 tablespoon of flour.

    I've poked around on the web for just "buttermilk pie" and most are almost
    as rich as that. Eggs are definitely required to thicken the custard
    unless you're going the unpleasant route of using a significant amount of
    starche.

    If you do indeed want a chess pie, it may very well be you technique in
    making it and baking it.

    First off, whatever recipe you use, the mixture should *never* be beaten,
    not even the eggs. The eggs should be well broken and yolks and whites
    gently encorporated with each other to avoid introducing air. The butter
    should be melted and combined thoroughly with the sugar, followed by the
    addition of the well mixed eggs. Lastly, the buttermilk or cream should be
    added. The mixture should be gently combined with a whisk without the
    usual quick "whisking" motion. Even after all the mixing, I usually allow
    the mixture to stand at room temperature for at least an hour, occasionally
    stirring to keep everything incorporated.

    It helps, too, to prebake the pastry and allow it to thoroughly cool. The
    edge should then be protected with foil when it's returned to the oven to
    bake the filling. My best results have been baking at 375F. for 50-60
    minutes, or until the filling is thoroughly set. I also "tent" the entire
    pie to prevent over-browning of the top. The tent can be removed near the
    end if the top isn't as brown as you'd like.

    HTH

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 04(IV)/20(XX)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    5wks 4hrs 35mins
    -------------------------------------------
    You have to stay in shape. My
    grandmother started walking five miles
    a day when she was 60. Now she's 97
    and we don't know *where* the hell she

  4. #4
    Ms P Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.184...
    > It doesn't seem to me that you really want a chess pie at all. Chess pie,
    > by its very nature, is rich with butter, sugar, and eggs. Granted some
    > have slightly less, but none have small amounts. My usual chess pie,
    > albeit not buttermilk, has a 1/2 cup butter, 8 egg yolks, 2 cups of sugar,
    > and 1-1/2 cups cream or evaporated milk. It also includes 1 tablespoon of
    > cornmeal and 2 tablespoon of flour.
    >
    > I've poked around on the web for just "buttermilk pie" and most are almost
    > as rich as that. Eggs are definitely required to thicken the custard
    > unless you're going the unpleasant route of using a significant amount of
    > starche.
    >
    > If you do indeed want a chess pie, it may very well be you technique in
    > making it and baking it.
    >
    > First off, whatever recipe you use, the mixture should *never* be beaten,
    > not even the eggs. The eggs should be well broken and yolks and whites
    > gently encorporated with each other to avoid introducing air. The butter
    > should be melted and combined thoroughly with the sugar, followed by the
    > addition of the well mixed eggs. Lastly, the buttermilk or cream should
    > be
    > added. The mixture should be gently combined with a whisk without the
    > usual quick "whisking" motion. Even after all the mixing, I usually
    > allow
    > the mixture to stand at room temperature for at least an hour,
    > occasionally
    > stirring to keep everything incorporated.
    >
    > It helps, too, to prebake the pastry and allow it to thoroughly cool. The
    > edge should then be protected with foil when it's returned to the oven to
    > bake the filling. My best results have been baking at 375F. for 50-60
    > minutes, or until the filling is thoroughly set. I also "tent" the entire
    > pie to prevent over-browning of the top. The tent can be removed near the
    > end if the top isn't as brown as you'd like.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright


    My mom makes a lemon chess pie that is simply to die for. I have the recipe
    around here somewhere but she's still around so I just get her to make them.
    Once you've had lemon chess, lemon meringue pales by comparison.

    Ms P


  5. #5
    Ms P Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.184...
    > It doesn't seem to me that you really want a chess pie at all. Chess pie,
    > by its very nature, is rich with butter, sugar, and eggs. Granted some
    > have slightly less, but none have small amounts. My usual chess pie,
    > albeit not buttermilk, has a 1/2 cup butter, 8 egg yolks, 2 cups of sugar,
    > and 1-1/2 cups cream or evaporated milk. It also includes 1 tablespoon of
    > cornmeal and 2 tablespoon of flour.
    >
    > I've poked around on the web for just "buttermilk pie" and most are almost
    > as rich as that. Eggs are definitely required to thicken the custard
    > unless you're going the unpleasant route of using a significant amount of
    > starche.
    >
    > If you do indeed want a chess pie, it may very well be you technique in
    > making it and baking it.
    >
    > First off, whatever recipe you use, the mixture should *never* be beaten,
    > not even the eggs. The eggs should be well broken and yolks and whites
    > gently encorporated with each other to avoid introducing air. The butter
    > should be melted and combined thoroughly with the sugar, followed by the
    > addition of the well mixed eggs. Lastly, the buttermilk or cream should
    > be
    > added. The mixture should be gently combined with a whisk without the
    > usual quick "whisking" motion. Even after all the mixing, I usually
    > allow
    > the mixture to stand at room temperature for at least an hour,
    > occasionally
    > stirring to keep everything incorporated.
    >
    > It helps, too, to prebake the pastry and allow it to thoroughly cool. The
    > edge should then be protected with foil when it's returned to the oven to
    > bake the filling. My best results have been baking at 375F. for 50-60
    > minutes, or until the filling is thoroughly set. I also "tent" the entire
    > pie to prevent over-browning of the top. The tent can be removed near the
    > end if the top isn't as brown as you'd like.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright


    My mom makes a lemon chess pie that is simply to die for. I have the recipe
    around here somewhere but she's still around so I just get her to make them.
    Once you've had lemon chess, lemon meringue pales by comparison.

    Ms P


  6. #6
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    On Sun 20 Apr 2008 08:20:54p, Ms P told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 3.184...
    >> It doesn't seem to me that you really want a chess pie at all. Chess
    >> pie, by its very nature, is rich with butter, sugar, and eggs. Granted
    >> some have slightly less, but none have small amounts. My usual chess
    >> pie, albeit not buttermilk, has a 1/2 cup butter, 8 egg yolks, 2 cups
    >> of sugar, and 1-1/2 cups cream or evaporated milk. It also includes 1
    >> tablespoon of cornmeal and 2 tablespoon of flour.
    >>
    >> I've poked around on the web for just "buttermilk pie" and most are
    >> almost as rich as that. Eggs are definitely required to thicken the
    >> custard unless you're going the unpleasant route of using a significant
    >> amount of starche.
    >>
    >> If you do indeed want a chess pie, it may very well be you technique in
    >> making it and baking it.
    >>
    >> First off, whatever recipe you use, the mixture should *never* be
    >> beaten, not even the eggs. The eggs should be well broken and yolks
    >> and whites gently encorporated with each other to avoid introducing
    >> air. The butter should be melted and combined thoroughly with the
    >> sugar, followed by the addition of the well mixed eggs. Lastly, the
    >> buttermilk or cream should be added. The mixture should be gently
    >> combined with a whisk without the usual quick "whisking" motion. Even
    >> after all the mixing, I usually allow the mixture to stand at room
    >> temperature for at least an hour, occasionally stirring to keep
    >> everything incorporated.
    >>
    >> It helps, too, to prebake the pastry and allow it to thoroughly cool.
    >> The edge should then be protected with foil when it's returned to the
    >> oven to bake the filling. My best results have been baking at 375F.
    >> for 50-60 minutes, or until the filling is thoroughly set. I also
    >> "tent" the entire pie to prevent over-browning of the top. The tent
    >> can be removed near the end if the top isn't as brown as you'd like.
    >>
    >> HTH
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright

    >
    > My mom makes a lemon chess pie that is simply to die for. I have the
    > recipe around here somewhere but she's still around so I just get her to
    > make them. Once you've had lemon chess, lemon meringue pales by
    > comparison.
    >
    > Ms P
    >
    >


    My grandmother made a killer lemon chess pie which I adore, and I have the
    recipe somewhere. I've made it a few times, and it's always a hit.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 04(IV)/20(XX)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    5wks 3hrs 25mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy
    me, send money.
    -------------------------------------------


  7. #7
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    On Sun 20 Apr 2008 08:20:54p, Ms P told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 3.184...
    >> It doesn't seem to me that you really want a chess pie at all. Chess
    >> pie, by its very nature, is rich with butter, sugar, and eggs. Granted
    >> some have slightly less, but none have small amounts. My usual chess
    >> pie, albeit not buttermilk, has a 1/2 cup butter, 8 egg yolks, 2 cups
    >> of sugar, and 1-1/2 cups cream or evaporated milk. It also includes 1
    >> tablespoon of cornmeal and 2 tablespoon of flour.
    >>
    >> I've poked around on the web for just "buttermilk pie" and most are
    >> almost as rich as that. Eggs are definitely required to thicken the
    >> custard unless you're going the unpleasant route of using a significant
    >> amount of starche.
    >>
    >> If you do indeed want a chess pie, it may very well be you technique in
    >> making it and baking it.
    >>
    >> First off, whatever recipe you use, the mixture should *never* be
    >> beaten, not even the eggs. The eggs should be well broken and yolks
    >> and whites gently encorporated with each other to avoid introducing
    >> air. The butter should be melted and combined thoroughly with the
    >> sugar, followed by the addition of the well mixed eggs. Lastly, the
    >> buttermilk or cream should be added. The mixture should be gently
    >> combined with a whisk without the usual quick "whisking" motion. Even
    >> after all the mixing, I usually allow the mixture to stand at room
    >> temperature for at least an hour, occasionally stirring to keep
    >> everything incorporated.
    >>
    >> It helps, too, to prebake the pastry and allow it to thoroughly cool.
    >> The edge should then be protected with foil when it's returned to the
    >> oven to bake the filling. My best results have been baking at 375F.
    >> for 50-60 minutes, or until the filling is thoroughly set. I also
    >> "tent" the entire pie to prevent over-browning of the top. The tent
    >> can be removed near the end if the top isn't as brown as you'd like.
    >>
    >> HTH
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright

    >
    > My mom makes a lemon chess pie that is simply to die for. I have the
    > recipe around here somewhere but she's still around so I just get her to
    > make them. Once you've had lemon chess, lemon meringue pales by
    > comparison.
    >
    > Ms P
    >
    >


    My grandmother made a killer lemon chess pie which I adore, and I have the
    recipe somewhere. I've made it a few times, and it's always a hit.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 04(IV)/20(XX)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    5wks 3hrs 25mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy
    me, send money.
    -------------------------------------------


  8. #8
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 22:20:54 -0500, "Ms P" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >My mom makes a lemon chess pie that is simply to die for. I have the recipe
    >around here somewhere but she's still around so I just get her to make them.
    >Once you've had lemon chess, lemon meringue pales by comparison.
    >
    >Ms P


    Oooh..that is my favorite pie now.
    I make the one from Edna Lewis...from The Gift of Southern Cooking.

    Christine

  9. #9
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 22:20:54 -0500, "Ms P" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >My mom makes a lemon chess pie that is simply to die for. I have the recipe
    >around here somewhere but she's still around so I just get her to make them.
    >Once you've had lemon chess, lemon meringue pales by comparison.
    >
    >Ms P


    Oooh..that is my favorite pie now.
    I make the one from Edna Lewis...from The Gift of Southern Cooking.

    Christine

  10. #10
    Goomba38 Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    Adam Preble wrote:

    > Does anybody have a good buttermilk pie recipe that isn't so
    > overwhelming? Does anybody have tips on the custard to make for a better
    > pie?


    These are two recipes I've had good luck with.

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Lime Coconut Buttermilk Pie

    Recipe By :Cuisine at Home
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :1:00
    Categories : Desserts Pies & Pastry

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    3/4 cup sweetened coconut flakes
    1/2 cup buttermilk
    1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk
    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
    2 eggs
    2 egg yolks
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    minced zest and juice of 1 lime
    pinch salt
    unbaked 9 inch pie shell

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees
    Whisk all ingredients together till blended
    Pour into pie shell and bake until filling just set, yet still a bit
    jiggly, aprox 40-50 min.
    Remove from oven and cool to room temp. Chill if not served right away.
    Let sit at room temp for 15 min before serving.


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Lemon Buttermilk Pie

    Recipe By :Cuisine at Home
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :1:00
    Categories : Desserts Pies & Pastry

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
    2 eggs
    2 egg yolks
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    minced zest and juice of 1 lemon
    pinch of salt
    9 inch pie crust

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    Whisk all ingredients together. Pour into pie shell and bake until
    filling is just set, yet still a bit jiggly, 40-50 min.
    Remove from oven and cool to room temp.
    Chill if not served right away, but allow to sit at room temp for 15 min
    before serving.

    Good served with sweetened strawberries and whipped cream.

  11. #11
    Goomba38 Guest

    Default Re: Looking for buttermilk chess pie that isn't a sugar grease pit

    Adam Preble wrote:

    > Does anybody have a good buttermilk pie recipe that isn't so
    > overwhelming? Does anybody have tips on the custard to make for a better
    > pie?


    These are two recipes I've had good luck with.

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Lime Coconut Buttermilk Pie

    Recipe By :Cuisine at Home
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :1:00
    Categories : Desserts Pies & Pastry

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    3/4 cup sweetened coconut flakes
    1/2 cup buttermilk
    1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk
    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
    2 eggs
    2 egg yolks
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    minced zest and juice of 1 lime
    pinch salt
    unbaked 9 inch pie shell

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees
    Whisk all ingredients together till blended
    Pour into pie shell and bake until filling just set, yet still a bit
    jiggly, aprox 40-50 min.
    Remove from oven and cool to room temp. Chill if not served right away.
    Let sit at room temp for 15 min before serving.


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Lemon Buttermilk Pie

    Recipe By :Cuisine at Home
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :1:00
    Categories : Desserts Pies & Pastry

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
    2 eggs
    2 egg yolks
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    minced zest and juice of 1 lemon
    pinch of salt
    9 inch pie crust

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    Whisk all ingredients together. Pour into pie shell and bake until
    filling is just set, yet still a bit jiggly, 40-50 min.
    Remove from oven and cool to room temp.
    Chill if not served right away, but allow to sit at room temp for 15 min
    before serving.

    Good served with sweetened strawberries and whipped cream.

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