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Thread: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

  1. #41
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>> Bull wrote:
    >>> > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    >>> > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> >
    >>> >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >>> >> do it?
    >>> >
    >>> > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    >>> > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    >>> > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    >>> > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    >>> > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    >>> > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    >>> > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    >>> > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    >>> > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    >>> > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.
    >>>
    >>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    >>> I am not good with math.

    >>
    >> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    >> tape measure.

    >
    >But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.


    Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  2. #42
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    Janet wrote:

    > Gawd it was the simplest explanation for Julie who can't even work out
    > how to cut a circle; do you seriously think she understands words like
    > radius and tangent?


    I haven't used my radius in ages -- all the music and talk I need is
    on the Web. I do like tangents because they're easier to peel than
    regular oranges.


  3. #43
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    Julie Bove wrote:

    > > I don't believe US ninth graders don't learn such basics. It's primary
    > > school stuff.

    >
    > Maybe it is now but I never learned it. We did adding, subtracting,
    > multiplying, dividing and some algebra in Junior High.


    Home ec can be engrossing for mathophobes.



  4. #44
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On 4/3/2012 5:19 AM, The Cook wrote:
    > On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Janet"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> In article<jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>>
    >>>> Bull wrote:
    >>>>> In article<jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    >>>>> "Julie Bove"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "Bull"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >>>>>> do it?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    >>>>> the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    >>>>> when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    >>>>> Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    >>>>> the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    >>>>> do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    >>>>> There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    >>>>> mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    >>>>> there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    >>>>> "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    >>>> I am not good with math.
    >>>
    >>> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    >>> tape measure.

    >>
    >> But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.

    >
    > Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.



    <*sigh*>




  5. #45
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
    > shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
    > complete circle. I had previously lined them with white Contact paper
    > but that didn't work so well. I couldn't get a piece that was the
    > right size so I wound up piecing some together. It looked like crap.
    > I decided to remove the paper in the flour cupboard after I discovered
    > the weevils. That cupboard has since had pretty much everything
    > replaced except for the salt.
    >
    > The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
    > looking and starting to rip.
    >
    > I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the
    > hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is
    > stuff flying off the sides as the shelves spin around.
    >
    > But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
    > flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't
    > work at all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces
    > there turned out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I
    > have now is big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't
    > really know how to explain it but the curved design is baffling me.
    > Also the fact that I can't access the entire cupboard at once. I can
    > only get to like...half of it or so.
    >
    > Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining
    > for me. He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.



    Julie,

    I have the same lazy susans. The door takes up 1/4 of the shelves.

    How about a little "pizza geometry?"

    Your liners should look like this:

    http://oi43.tinypic.com/r87511.jpg

    Start with large pizza and trim around the "crust" to fit the shelf.

    Once one liner fits use that to duplicate as many as needed by tracing
    the shape and cut with scissors.

    Andy

  6. #46
    Bull Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <XnsA02A68B27C763Cotd@216.196.97.131>, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
    > > shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
    > > complete circle. I had previously lined them with white Contact paper
    > > but that didn't work so well. I couldn't get a piece that was the
    > > right size so I wound up piecing some together. It looked like crap.
    > > I decided to remove the paper in the flour cupboard after I discovered
    > > the weevils. That cupboard has since had pretty much everything
    > > replaced except for the salt.
    > >
    > > The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
    > > looking and starting to rip.
    > >
    > > I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the
    > > hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is
    > > stuff flying off the sides as the shelves spin around.
    > >
    > > But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
    > > flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't
    > > work at all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces
    > > there turned out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I
    > > have now is big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't
    > > really know how to explain it but the curved design is baffling me.
    > > Also the fact that I can't access the entire cupboard at once. I can
    > > only get to like...half of it or so.
    > >
    > > Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining
    > > for me. He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.

    >
    >
    > Julie,
    >
    > I have the same lazy susans. The door takes up 1/4 of the shelves.
    >
    > How about a little "pizza geometry?"
    >
    > Your liners should look like this:
    >
    > http://oi43.tinypic.com/r87511.jpg
    >
    > Start with large pizza and trim around the "crust" to fit the shelf.
    >
    > Once one liner fits use that to duplicate as many as needed by tracing
    > the shape and cut with scissors.
    >
    > Andy


    LOL - If that don't work just forgetit.

    BULL

  7. #47
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]..
    >>> In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>>
    >>>> Bull wrote:
    >>>> > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    >>>> > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> >
    >>>> >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> >
    >>>> >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >>>> >> do it?
    >>>> >
    >>>> > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    >>>> > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    >>>> > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    >>>> > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    >>>> > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    >>>> > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    >>>> > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    >>>> > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    >>>> > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    >>>> > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    >>>> I am not good with math.
    >>>
    >>> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    >>> tape measure.

    >>
    >>But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.

    >
    > Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.


    Thank you. That would be pretty hard to measure seeing as how I can't
    access all of it at once.



  8. #48
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "George M. Middius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> > I don't believe US ninth graders don't learn such basics. It's primary
    >> > school stuff.

    >>
    >> Maybe it is now but I never learned it. We did adding, subtracting,
    >> multiplying, dividing and some algebra in Junior High.

    >
    > Home ec can be engrossing for mathophobes.


    The only math we learned in Home Ec was how to scale a recipe up or down.



  9. #49
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
    >> shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
    >> complete circle. I had previously lined them with white Contact paper
    >> but that didn't work so well. I couldn't get a piece that was the
    >> right size so I wound up piecing some together. It looked like crap.
    >> I decided to remove the paper in the flour cupboard after I discovered
    >> the weevils. That cupboard has since had pretty much everything
    >> replaced except for the salt.
    >>
    >> The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
    >> looking and starting to rip.
    >>
    >> I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in the
    >> hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've had is
    >> stuff flying off the sides as the shelves spin around.
    >>
    >> But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is more
    >> flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just didn't
    >> work at all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces
    >> there turned out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I
    >> have now is big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't
    >> really know how to explain it but the curved design is baffling me.
    >> Also the fact that I can't access the entire cupboard at once. I can
    >> only get to like...half of it or so.
    >>
    >> Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining
    >> for me. He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.

    >
    >
    > Julie,
    >
    > I have the same lazy susans. The door takes up 1/4 of the shelves.
    >
    > How about a little "pizza geometry?"
    >
    > Your liners should look like this:
    >
    > http://oi43.tinypic.com/r87511.jpg
    >
    > Start with large pizza and trim around the "crust" to fit the shelf.
    >
    > Once one liner fits use that to duplicate as many as needed by tracing
    > the shape and cut with scissors.


    Yes! The problem is that the liner I think is not big enough to do that.



  10. #50
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>
    >>> Bull wrote:
    >>> > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    >>> > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> >
    >>> >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >>> >> do it?
    >>> >
    >>> > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    >>> > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    >>> > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    >>> > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    >>> > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    >>> > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    >>> > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    >>> > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    >>> > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    >>> > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.
    >>>
    >>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    >>> I am not good with math.

    >>
    >> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    >> tape measure.

    >
    >But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.


    Diameter is that number on your bra size label.

  11. #51
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Tue, 03 Apr 2012 07:19:28 -0400, The Cook <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]..
    >>> In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>>>
    >>>> Bull wrote:
    >>>> > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    >>>> > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> >
    >>>> >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> >
    >>>> >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >>>> >> do it?
    >>>> >
    >>>> > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    >>>> > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    >>>> > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    >>>> > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    >>>> > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    >>>> > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    >>>> > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    >>>> > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    >>>> > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    >>>> > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    >>>> I am not good with math.
    >>>
    >>> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    >>> tape measure.

    >>
    >>But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.

    >
    >Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.


    Then what's circumference? duh


  12. #52
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Apr 2, 8:12*pm, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit>
    wrote:
    > On 4/2/2012 3:51 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > > What's an axis? *I really am not good at math.

    >
    > I can't take it anymore.


    Yeah, we should all cry "uncle," and move on. Even Shel won't touch
    it. LOL.

    N.

  13. #53
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Apr 2, 11:00*pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:9915747.2067.1333425238531.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@ynjx8...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Monday, April 2, 2012 10:40:08 PM UTC-5, Julie Bove wrote:

    >
    > >> <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net> wrote in message
    > >>news:8712123.454.1333422758312.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yncc41...
    > >> > On Monday, April 2, 2012 11:12:13 AM UTC-5, Pennyaline wrote:

    >
    > >> >> Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    > >> >> thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    > >> >> parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    > >> >> kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
    > >> >> over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.

    >
    > >> > If things are flying off because you are having to use so much forceto
    > >> > turn this lazy susan then it needs to be adjusted so it will turn
    > >> > easily.
    > >> > And why do these shelves HAVE to be lined???

    >
    > >> They are made of porous wood. *If I had the plastic ones, I wouldn't
    > >> bother
    > >> to line them. *I guess technically they don't *have* to be lined
    > >> especially
    > >> since I have everything in the one cupboard in plastic containers.
    > >> However
    > >> the previous owner had lined them with Contact paper that was ripped and
    > >> bad
    > >> looking. *It didn't peel up fully and neither did the paper that I put on
    > >> there. *So there's a lot of adhesive with paper stuck to it here and
    > >> there.
    > >> Looks like crap. *Plus I sprayed the one with bug spray after I got the
    > >> weevils. *I would just feel safer to have a layer of something between it
    > >> and my food.

    >
    > >> My cupboard apparently isn't typical from what I have just looked at
    > >> online
    > >> because the cabinet front is attached to the lazy Susan. *This (I think)
    > >> in
    > >> and of itself is causing it to go off balance. *That and the way the
    > >> cabinet
    > >> front fits into the opening. *I think the wood swells and causes it to
    > >> stick. *Sometimes it will only go one way and not the other.

    >
    > > My double lazy susan has the cabinet door attached to the shelves and
    > > looke like a large pie wedge. *How would those shelves fair if you painted
    > > them?

    >
    > I don't know but... *I don't like to use paint and with a curious little
    > kitten in the house it probably wouldn't go so well. *I wouldn't think most
    > paint would be washable though and if I did get that kind it would require
    > many coats of paint given how porous that wood is.


    You don't like to use paint, but you willingly spray BUG SPRAY inside
    a FOOD STORAGE AREA. I give up. I actually don't know how you manage
    to wake up in the morning or use a computer.

    N.

  14. #54
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 20:08:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:4f7a633c$0$52252$[email protected]. .
    >> On 4/2/2012 7:20 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>> "Pennyaline"<[email protected] nit> wrote in message
    >>> news:4f7a4dbd$0$9077$[email protected]..
    >>>> On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>>>> There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.
    >>>>
    >>>> Of a lazy susan??
    >>>
    >>> Not on the one I have. It has a very shallow lip on it. But if you
    >>> stack
    >>> two cans high which I have to do, the top can will fall off. The other
    >>> cupboard is the one I use for flour and baking things. Everything in
    >>> there
    >>> is now in a plastic container so not likely to fall off. But prior I
    >>> just
    >>> had the bags in there. They were all small bags because these were
    >>> alternate flours like rice and tapioca. The bags would fall off of the
    >>> ends.

    >>
    >>
    >> I'll ask again: The "shelves" of your lazy susan have "ends"? You mean to
    >> say that they are not a level or two of complete circles that turn on a
    >> center post?

    >
    >Here's a pic of something similar. This isn't exactly what mine is because
    >mine is all wood and is attached to the cabinet fronts. It's the pie cut.
    >Mine has two shelves.
    >
    >http://www.cabinetparts.com/c/kitche...FQOEhwod3n10xg


    Those things waste a lot of space... I'd remove them. I have two
    corner cabinets that are quite deep, so I use them to store tall items
    like paper towels stacked on end, aluminum foil/wax paper, plastic
    wrap boxes on end, 2 liter soda bottles, way into the depths gallon
    jugs of emergency water, and near the front 1.75 L bottles of Crystal
    Palace. I wouldn't think to store canned goods in any bottom cabinet,
    they are all too deep and too low... I hate creeping about on the
    floor to find stuff. Bottom cabinets are for storing large items one
    doesn't use on a daily basis, even a monthly basis. But I do use
    those small plastic lazy susans from Rubbermaid (I have three) in one
    of my upper cabinets for storing spice bottles; items on the lazy
    susan and items around the perimeter, no wasted space. I don't store
    many canned goods and rarely used items in my kitchen, that's what a
    basement is for.

  15. #55
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > >Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.

    >
    > Then what's circumference? duh


    You can learn that at your mosque.


  16. #56
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 21:00:01 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:9915747.2067.1333425238531.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@ynjx8...
    >> On Monday, April 2, 2012 10:40:08 PM UTC-5, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>>
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:8712123.454.1333422758312.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yncc41...
    >>> > On Monday, April 2, 2012 11:12:13 AM UTC-5, Pennyaline wrote:
    >>> >>
    >>> >>
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    >>> >> thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    >>> >> parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    >>> >> kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
    >>> >> over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.
    >>> >>
    >>> >>
    >>> > If things are flying off because you are having to use so much force to
    >>> > turn this lazy susan then it needs to be adjusted so it will turn
    >>> > easily.
    >>> > And why do these shelves HAVE to be lined???
    >>>
    >>> They are made of porous wood. If I had the plastic ones, I wouldn't
    >>> bother
    >>> to line them. I guess technically they don't *have* to be lined
    >>> especially
    >>> since I have everything in the one cupboard in plastic containers.
    >>> However
    >>> the previous owner had lined them with Contact paper that was ripped and
    >>> bad
    >>> looking. It didn't peel up fully and neither did the paper that I put on
    >>> there. So there's a lot of adhesive with paper stuck to it here and
    >>> there.
    >>> Looks like crap. Plus I sprayed the one with bug spray after I got the
    >>> weevils. I would just feel safer to have a layer of something between it
    >>> and my food.
    >>>
    >>> My cupboard apparently isn't typical from what I have just looked at
    >>> online
    >>> because the cabinet front is attached to the lazy Susan. This (I think)
    >>> in
    >>> and of itself is causing it to go off balance. That and the way the
    >>> cabinet
    >>> front fits into the opening. I think the wood swells and causes it to
    >>> stick. Sometimes it will only go one way and not the other.
    >>> >
    >>> >

    >>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> My double lazy susan has the cabinet door attached to the shelves and
    >> looke like a large pie wedge. How would those shelves fair if you painted
    >> them?

    >
    >I don't know but... I don't like to use paint and with a curious little
    >kitten in the house it probably wouldn't go so well. I wouldn't think most
    >paint would be washable though and if I did get that kind it would require
    >many coats of paint given how porous that wood is.


    Nancy Young's suggestion; self stick floor tiles, inexpensive and easy
    to cut with scissors. And washable paint is readily available, it's
    called deck enamel, used to paint concrete floors but can be used on
    wood too... both oil based and water based are available... there are
    also very nice epoxy paints, more expensive but you don't need much
    for lazy susans. Personally I'd remove those lazy susans and toss
    them into the trash.

  17. #57
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <[email protected]>, susan_r23666
    @yahoo.com says...
    >
    > On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    > >>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    > >>> I am not good with math.
    > >>
    > >> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    > >> tape measure.

    > >
    > >But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.

    >
    > Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.


    Nope, that's the circumference.

    Gawd, two of them. Can you believe it.

    Janet

  18. #58
    Bull Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > On Tue, 03 Apr 2012 07:19:28 -0400, The Cook <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 19:20:03 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>news:[email protected]..
    > >>> In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >>>>
    > >>>> Bull wrote:
    > >>>> > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    > >>>> > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>> >
    > >>>> >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>>> >
    > >>>> >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    > >>>> >> do it?
    > >>>> >
    > >>>> > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    > >>>> > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    > >>>> > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    > >>>> > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    > >>>> > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    > >>>> > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    > >>>> > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    > >>>> > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    > >>>> > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    > >>>> > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    > >>>> I am not good with math.
    > >>>
    > >>> Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    > >>> tape measure.
    > >>
    > >>But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.

    > >
    > >Diameter is the measurement around the outside of the circle.

    >
    > Then what's circumference? duh


    Andy could you draw up a pepperoni circumcision?

    BULL

  19. #59
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f79cfdd$0$73614$[email protected]..
    > On 4/2/2012 8:33 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my kitchen. I
    >> don't even have room to store paper products in the kitchen. They are in
    >> the garage. I do have a small pullout cabinet to store things like
    >> plastic
    >> bags. I freaking hate those pullouts too but all of my lower cabinets
    >> are
    >> those. Things fall behind just as they fly off the shelves of the lazy
    >> Susan. I just ordered some new reaching tools. It is hard for me to get
    >> back there.

    >
    >
    > Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    > thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    > parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    > kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling over,
    > yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.



    Exactly! I had one lazy susan cabinet in a kitchen years ago. I stored
    jars of spices and bottles of things like worcestershire, teriyaki and other
    bottled sauces there. I certainly didn't spin it so hard things flew off to
    the back of the cabinet!

    I don't have a lazy susan-type cabinet now. I do have a wooden lazy susan
    on the counter next to the stove for the always go-to herbs and spices
    And a smaller one in one of the cabinets for the aforementioned bottles.
    Still, stuff doesn't fly off the shelves. I don't spin them like roulette
    wheels.

    Jill


  20. #60
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f7a633c$0$52252$[email protected]..
    > On 4/2/2012 7:20 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> "Pennyaline"<[email protected] nit> wrote in message
    >> news:4f7a4dbd$0$9077$[email protected]..
    >>> On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>>> There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.
    >>>
    >>> Of a lazy susan??

    >>
    >> Not on the one I have. It has a very shallow lip on it. But if you
    >> stack
    >> two cans high which I have to do, the top can will fall off.

    (snippage)

    So don't put canned goods on the lazy susan! Lazy susans weren't designed
    for stacking canned goods.

    Seems Julie is now telling us most of her kitchen cabinets are built-in lazy
    susans. I simply don't believe it. This is one instance where I'd like to
    see a photograph of all these (opened) lazy-susan style cabinets.

    Jill


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