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Thread: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

  1. #21
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    Nancy2 wrote:
    > On Apr 2, 9:31 am, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    >> "Bull" <b...@bluemail.net> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> In article <jlblms$d1...@dont-email.me>,
    >>> "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:

    >>
    >>>> I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
    >>>> shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
    >>>> complete circle.
    >>>> I had previously lined them with white Contact paper but that
    >>>> didn't work so
    >>>> well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
    >>>> piecing
    >>>> some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the paper
    >>>> in
    >>>> the
    >>>> flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That cupboard has
    >>>> since had
    >>>> pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.

    >>
    >>>> The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
    >>>> looking and
    >>>> starting to rip.

    >>
    >>>> I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in
    >>>> the hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've
    >>>> had is stuff flying
    >>>> off the sides as the shelves spin around.

    >>
    >>>> But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is
    >>>> more flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just
    >>>> didn't work at
    >>>> all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces there
    >>>> turned
    >>>> out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff I have now is
    >>>> big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I don't really
    >>>> know how to explain it but the curved design is baffling me. Also
    >>>> the fact that I can't
    >>>> access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half
    >>>> of it or
    >>>> so.

    >>
    >>>> Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the lining
    >>>> for me.
    >>>> He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.

    >>
    >>> I made a pattern. Cut the liner like the pattern and fit. If the
    >>> material isn't large enough make a butt seam and tape it on the
    >>> underside. (I used packing tape) Install fitted liner.

    >>
    >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >> do it?

    >
    > Geez, Julie, it isn't rocket science - how do you make a pattern for
    > anything? You can access the curved edge of the shelf by turning it
    > around - just cut a bunch of pie-shaped pieces (use just one small
    > piece of newspaper to make one pie-shaped piece that has the proper
    > curvature on it) and tape them together to exactly fit the shelf. I
    > guess you would have to empty the shelf first. Duh.


    I don't know. That's why I asked. I have never made a pattern for
    anything!



  2. #22
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 14:49:57 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 07:33:25 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    >>> news:atcjn[email protected]..
    >>>> On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 00:49:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish
    >>>>> shelves just sort of go around and around. The cupboard is not a
    >>>>> complete circle. I had previously lined them with white Contact
    >>>>> paper but that didn't work so
    >>>>> well. I couldn't get a piece that was the right size so I wound up
    >>>>> piecing
    >>>>> some together. It looked like crap. I decided to remove the
    >>>>> paper in the flour cupboard after I discovered the weevils. That
    >>>>> cupboard has since had
    >>>>> pretty much everything replaced except for the salt.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The other cupboard has mainly canned goods but the liner is old
    >>>>> looking and
    >>>>> starting to rip.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have bought some of that spongy liner with the holes in it in
    >>>>> the hopes that it will keep things from sliding. One problem I've
    >>>>> had is stuff flying
    >>>>> off the sides as the shelves spin around.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> But how to cut it? This might be easier to install because it is
    >>>>> more flexible. I had purchased some white liner online that just
    >>>>> didn't work at
    >>>>> all. It was very stiff and slick and even when cut in pieces
    >>>>> there turned out not to be enough of it. I am not sure the stuff
    >>>>> I have now is big enough to be able to put just one piece in. I
    >>>>> don't really know how to explain it but the curved design is
    >>>>> baffling me. Also the fact that I can't
    >>>>> access the entire cupboard at once. I can only get to like...half
    >>>>> of it or
    >>>>> so.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any ideas? Or hmmm... Maybe I could pay my nephew to do the
    >>>>> lining for me.
    >>>>> He's had a heck of a lot more math than I have.
    >>>>
    >>>> Lazy susans in corner cabinets are a waste of space and schmutz
    >>>> collectors, especially underneath... get rid of them. I use one of
    >>>> those grocer's friends to reach into the far recesses of corner
    >>>> cabinets... a good place to store paper products.
    >>>
    >>> I would love to get rid of them but I can't afford to redo my
    >>> kitchen.

    >>
    >> There is no kitchen redoing. It should be very easy to remove the
    >> lazy susan, all you need is a screw driver and someone who can reach
    >> into the cabinet to remove the bracket at the top, then the whole
    >> assembly lifts out so you can remove the bottom bracket, or just leave
    >> it there... I'd reattach the top bracket as well so it doesn't get
    >> misplaced in case someone wants to reinstall the lazy susan.

    >
    >But then I'd be left with a big gaping hole!


    No, I'm not going to say it.

  3. #23
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.


    Of a lazy susan??

  4. #24
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On 4/2/2012 3:51 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > What's an axis? I really am not good at math.



    I can't take it anymore.

  5. #25
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f7a4dbd$0$9077$[email protected]..
    > On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.

    >
    > Of a lazy susan??


    Not on the one I have. It has a very shallow lip on it. But if you stack
    two cans high which I have to do, the top can will fall off. The other
    cupboard is the one I use for flour and baking things. Everything in there
    is now in a plastic container so not likely to fall off. But prior I just
    had the bags in there. They were all small bags because these were
    alternate flours like rice and tapioca. The bags would fall off of the
    ends.



  6. #26
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f7a4e7f$0$9077$[email protected]..
    > On 4/2/2012 3:51 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> What's an axis? I really am not good at math.

    >
    >
    > I can't take it anymore.


    Then don't. I only took up to 9th grade math. I never took geometry. Some
    people have explained how to do it using newspaper and the like. So now I
    understand. Mathematical terms, I don't understand. Yeah I could look it
    up. But I really wanted an answer. That's why I asked.



  7. #27
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1 says...
    >
    > On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 18:31:50 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >> On 4/2/2012 10:31 AM, Julie Bove wrote:

    > >
    > >> > But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you do it?

    > >
    > > Use a double-page of newspaper. If your newspaper is too small tape two
    > >sheets together.
    > >
    > > You need some string, a pencil and a tape measure or ruler. Tie the
    > >pencil onto one eld of the string.
    > >
    > > Measure the width of your lazy susan across the middle. That's the
    > >diameter of the circle. The radius of the circle is half the diameter. Cut
    > >the string to half the diameter.
    > >
    > > Put the cut end in the middle of the paper, hold it with one finger.
    > >With the other hand, hold the string taut and the pencil straight and use
    > >it to draw a circle. Cut it out. That;s your pattern.
    > >
    > > If your Lazy susan has a centre spindle you'll need a centre cut out on
    > >the patternpaper to fit round it. Fold your paper circle in half, then in
    > >quarters, and cut off the point. Now cut a straight line from the centre
    > >hole to one edge of the circle. Lay your paper pattern on the lazy susan
    > >to check it's a good fit.

    >
    > Didn't you ever cut out paper valentine hearts and paper doilys in
    > kindergarten by folding and then cutting through all layers at once?
    > A couple lengths of butcher paper taped together to form a slightly
    > over sized square should do it... can fold the paper in half, in half
    > again, and in half once more to make a triangle, then measure from the
    > point the radius distance and cut on a tangent.


    Gawd it was the simplest explanation for Julie who can't even work out
    how to cut a circle; do you seriously think she understands words like
    radius and tangent?

    Janet

  8. #28
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <jld6u5$k3d$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > But then I'd be left with a big gaping hole!


    <sits on hands. I will resist, I will resist...>

    Janet

  9. #29
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > Bull wrote:
    > > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    > > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > >
    > >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    > >> do it?

    > >
    > > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    > > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    > > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    > > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    > > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    > > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    > > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    > > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    > > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    > > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.

    >
    > How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    > I am not good with math.


    Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    tape measure.


    Janet



  10. #30
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    In article <jldjbq$n4i$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:4f7a4e7f$0$9077$[email protected]..
    > > On 4/2/2012 3:51 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > >> What's an axis? I really am not good at math.

    > >
    > >
    > > I can't take it anymore.

    >
    > Then don't. I only took up to 9th grade math.


    I don't believe US ninth graders don't learn such basics. It's primary
    school stuff.

    Janet



  11. #31
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <jld6vv$kjl$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >> Bull wrote:
    >> > In article <jlcd7b$l3t$[email protected]>,
    >> > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> "Bull" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >
    >> >> But how do you make the pattern? What is it made of and how do you
    >> >> do it?
    >> >
    >> > The ones I have are a circle with a wedge cut out and have a lip all
    >> > the way around. Measure the diameter of the circle and cut one.
    >> > when you have the circle make a split to the center for the post.
    >> > Cut out the wedge. Tweak the pattern until it fits. Then trace to
    >> > the liner cut another one. Takes a little time but not that hard to
    >> > do. My house was built about 1990 and those were the thing then.
    >> > There are much better storage solutions today - but I'm not taking
    >> > mine out because I am never changing the cabinets. I know what's in
    >> > there and don't have a problem with it. It is way better than a
    >> > "dead space" corner. Mine are in the lower cabinets only.

    >>
    >> How do I measure the diamater of the circle?
    >> I am not good with math.

    >
    > Jesus christ, you don't need to be good at maths to read a number on a
    > tape measure.


    But you do to know what diameter is. And I don't know.



  12. #32
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <jldjbq$n4i$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >> "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:4f7a4e7f$0$9077$[email protected]..
    >> > On 4/2/2012 3:51 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> >> What's an axis? I really am not good at math.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > I can't take it anymore.

    >>
    >> Then don't. I only took up to 9th grade math.

    >
    > I don't believe US ninth graders don't learn such basics. It's primary
    > school stuff.


    Maybe it is now but I never learned it. We did adding, subtracting,
    multiplying, dividing and some algebra in Junior High.



  13. #33
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On 4/2/2012 7:20 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > "Pennyaline"<[email protected] nit> wrote in message
    > news:4f7a4dbd$0$9077$[email protected]..
    >> On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>> There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.

    >>
    >> Of a lazy susan??

    >
    > Not on the one I have. It has a very shallow lip on it. But if you stack
    > two cans high which I have to do, the top can will fall off. The other
    > cupboard is the one I use for flour and baking things. Everything in there
    > is now in a plastic container so not likely to fall off. But prior I just
    > had the bags in there. They were all small bags because these were
    > alternate flours like rice and tapioca. The bags would fall off of the
    > ends.



    I'll ask again: The "shelves" of your lazy susan have "ends"? You mean
    to say that they are not a level or two of complete circles that turn on
    a center post?

  14. #34
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f7a633c$0$52252$[email protected]..
    > On 4/2/2012 7:20 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> "Pennyaline"<[email protected] nit> wrote in message
    >> news:4f7a4dbd$0$9077$[email protected]..
    >>> On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>>> There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.
    >>>
    >>> Of a lazy susan??

    >>
    >> Not on the one I have. It has a very shallow lip on it. But if you
    >> stack
    >> two cans high which I have to do, the top can will fall off. The other
    >> cupboard is the one I use for flour and baking things. Everything in
    >> there
    >> is now in a plastic container so not likely to fall off. But prior I
    >> just
    >> had the bags in there. They were all small bags because these were
    >> alternate flours like rice and tapioca. The bags would fall off of the
    >> ends.

    >
    >
    > I'll ask again: The "shelves" of your lazy susan have "ends"? You mean to
    > say that they are not a level or two of complete circles that turn on a
    > center post?


    I said before they are not complete circles. No. There is a front to the
    cabinet with two pieces to it that meet at right angles. You push it either
    way to access the food within. There are two shelves each with a shallow
    lip. At either end there is just a lot of air space where the corners are.
    Stuff falls off of that.



  15. #35
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Monday, April 2, 2012 9:18:43 AM UTC-5, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 2 Apr 2012 00:49:52 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have two of those lazy Susan type cupboards where the roundish shelves
    > >just sort of go around and around.

    >
    > Lazy susans in corner cabinets are a waste of space and schmutz
    > collectors, especially underneath... get rid of them. I use one of
    > those grocer's friends to reach into the far recesses of corner
    > cabinets... a good place to store paper products.
    >
    >

    I have a lazy susan cabinet in my kitchen, it's in a lower cabinet and has been a blessing for me. Everything is within easy reach, on both shelves.


  16. #36
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f7a633c$0$52252$[email protected]..
    > On 4/2/2012 7:20 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >> "Pennyaline"<[email protected] nit> wrote in message
    >> news:4f7a4dbd$0$9077$[email protected]..
    >>> On 4/2/2012 3:49 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>>> There is nothing at the end to keep the items at the end on the shelf.
    >>>
    >>> Of a lazy susan??

    >>
    >> Not on the one I have. It has a very shallow lip on it. But if you
    >> stack
    >> two cans high which I have to do, the top can will fall off. The other
    >> cupboard is the one I use for flour and baking things. Everything in
    >> there
    >> is now in a plastic container so not likely to fall off. But prior I
    >> just
    >> had the bags in there. They were all small bags because these were
    >> alternate flours like rice and tapioca. The bags would fall off of the
    >> ends.

    >
    >
    > I'll ask again: The "shelves" of your lazy susan have "ends"? You mean to
    > say that they are not a level or two of complete circles that turn on a
    > center post?


    Here's a pic of something similar. This isn't exactly what mine is because
    mine is all wood and is attached to the cabinet fronts. It's the pie cut.
    Mine has two shelves.

    http://www.cabinetparts.com/c/kitche...FQOEhwod3n10xg



  17. #37
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Monday, April 2, 2012 11:12:13 AM UTC-5, Pennyaline wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    > thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    > parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    > kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
    > over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.
    >
    >

    If things are flying off because you are having to use so much force to turn this lazy susan then it needs to be adjusted so it will turn easily. And why do these shelves HAVE to be lined???



  18. #38
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:8712123.454.1333422758312.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yncc41...
    > On Monday, April 2, 2012 11:12:13 AM UTC-5, Pennyaline wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    >> thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    >> parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    >> kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
    >> over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.
    >>
    >>

    > If things are flying off because you are having to use so much force to
    > turn this lazy susan then it needs to be adjusted so it will turn easily.
    > And why do these shelves HAVE to be lined???


    They are made of porous wood. If I had the plastic ones, I wouldn't bother
    to line them. I guess technically they don't *have* to be lined especially
    since I have everything in the one cupboard in plastic containers. However
    the previous owner had lined them with Contact paper that was ripped and bad
    looking. It didn't peel up fully and neither did the paper that I put on
    there. So there's a lot of adhesive with paper stuck to it here and there.
    Looks like crap. Plus I sprayed the one with bug spray after I got the
    weevils. I would just feel safer to have a layer of something between it
    and my food.

    My cupboard apparently isn't typical from what I have just looked at online
    because the cabinet front is attached to the lazy Susan. This (I think) in
    and of itself is causing it to go off balance. That and the way the cabinet
    front fits into the opening. I think the wood swells and causes it to
    stick. Sometimes it will only go one way and not the other.
    >
    >




  19. #39
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard

    On Monday, April 2, 2012 10:40:08 PM UTC-5, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:8712123.454.1333422758312.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yncc41...
    > > On Monday, April 2, 2012 11:12:13 AM UTC-5, Pennyaline wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    > >> thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    > >> parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    > >> kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
    > >> over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.
    > >>
    > >>

    > > If things are flying off because you are having to use so much force to
    > > turn this lazy susan then it needs to be adjusted so it will turn easily.
    > > And why do these shelves HAVE to be lined???

    >
    > They are made of porous wood. If I had the plastic ones, I wouldn't bother
    > to line them. I guess technically they don't *have* to be lined especially
    > since I have everything in the one cupboard in plastic containers. However
    > the previous owner had lined them with Contact paper that was ripped and bad
    > looking. It didn't peel up fully and neither did the paper that I put on
    > there. So there's a lot of adhesive with paper stuck to it here and there.
    > Looks like crap. Plus I sprayed the one with bug spray after I got the
    > weevils. I would just feel safer to have a layer of something between it
    > and my food.
    >
    > My cupboard apparently isn't typical from what I have just looked at online
    > because the cabinet front is attached to the lazy Susan. This (I think) in
    > and of itself is causing it to go off balance. That and the way the cabinet
    > front fits into the opening. I think the wood swells and causes it to
    > stick. Sometimes it will only go one way and not the other.
    > >
    > >


    >
    >

    My double lazy susan has the cabinet door attached to the shelves and looke like a large pie wedge. How would those shelves fair if you painted them?

  20. #40
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Lining a lazy Susan cupboard


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:9915747.2067.1333425238531.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@ynjx8...
    > On Monday, April 2, 2012 10:40:08 PM UTC-5, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>
    >> <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:8712123.454.1333422758312.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yncc41...
    >> > On Monday, April 2, 2012 11:12:13 AM UTC-5, Pennyaline wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> Why do things "fly off the shelves"? How hard to you spin the damned
    >> >> thing? I've dealt with those corner cupboard lazy susan things in my
    >> >> parents' homes and my siblings' homes, and I had them in one of my
    >> >> kitchens once, and I've not experienced anything flying off. Falling
    >> >> over, yes, but never falling off or flying anywhere.
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> > If things are flying off because you are having to use so much force to
    >> > turn this lazy susan then it needs to be adjusted so it will turn
    >> > easily.
    >> > And why do these shelves HAVE to be lined???

    >>
    >> They are made of porous wood. If I had the plastic ones, I wouldn't
    >> bother
    >> to line them. I guess technically they don't *have* to be lined
    >> especially
    >> since I have everything in the one cupboard in plastic containers.
    >> However
    >> the previous owner had lined them with Contact paper that was ripped and
    >> bad
    >> looking. It didn't peel up fully and neither did the paper that I put on
    >> there. So there's a lot of adhesive with paper stuck to it here and
    >> there.
    >> Looks like crap. Plus I sprayed the one with bug spray after I got the
    >> weevils. I would just feel safer to have a layer of something between it
    >> and my food.
    >>
    >> My cupboard apparently isn't typical from what I have just looked at
    >> online
    >> because the cabinet front is attached to the lazy Susan. This (I think)
    >> in
    >> and of itself is causing it to go off balance. That and the way the
    >> cabinet
    >> front fits into the opening. I think the wood swells and causes it to
    >> stick. Sometimes it will only go one way and not the other.
    >> >
    >> >

    >
    >>
    >>

    > My double lazy susan has the cabinet door attached to the shelves and
    > looke like a large pie wedge. How would those shelves fair if you painted
    > them?


    I don't know but... I don't like to use paint and with a curious little
    kitten in the house it probably wouldn't go so well. I wouldn't think most
    paint would be washable though and if I did get that kind it would require
    many coats of paint given how porous that wood is.



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