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Thread: Light butter.

  1. #1
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Light butter.

    Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    of fat that is 25% less fat?
    Some quick research on a dairy-related web site explained that:

    "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    unless they are specifically created for light butter."

    Good for the dairy industry I guess, sell a product for the same price
    but make 25% of it just air and water. Whoever came up with that
    insipid, anemic-looking abomination should be forced to eat a whole
    pound of it, at one sitting, on something hot.
    Must remember to be much more observant when buying butter!

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  2. #2
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    Ross@home wrote:

    > Good for the dairy industry I guess, sell a product for the same price
    > but make 25% of it just air and water. Whoever came up with that
    > insipid, anemic-looking abomination should be forced to eat a whole
    > pound of it, at one sitting, on something hot.
    > Must remember to be much more observant when buying butter!


    Indeed. Labels often reveal the contents of packages.


  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:30:44 -0400, Ross@home wrote:

    > Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    > sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    > taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    > pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    > butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    > of fat that is 25% less fat?
    > Some quick research on a dairy-related web site explained that:
    >
    > "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    > water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    > of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    > bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    > hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    > unless they are specifically created for light butter."


    Interesting. I never knew this stuff existed. It looks like it's
    been allowable since 1995 here in the U.S.

    http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getf...STELDEV3004554

    What I don't understand is that is says:

    Composition Requirements.
    - Milkfat -- Not more than 40%
    - Salt -- Not more than 1.5%

    So does this mean that it may not have any butter in it at all? That
    would also make your "light butter" illegal here in the U.S. since it
    contains TOO MUCH butter :-)

    It seems you may have "in between butter".

    It also states that "the product must not be nutritionally inferior to
    traditional butter and performance characteristics should be similar
    to that of regular butter".

    Which makes no sense. Obviously it's no good for frying or baking,
    and with only half the fat, that makes it drastically "nutritionally
    inferior".

    -sw

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:30:44 -0400, Ross@home wrote:

    > Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    > sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    > taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    > pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    > butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    > of fat that is 25% less fat?
    > Some quick research on a dairy-related web site explained that:
    >
    > "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    > water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    > of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    > bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    > hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    > unless they are specifically created for light butter."
    >
    > Good for the dairy industry I guess, sell a product for the same price
    > but make 25% of it just air and water. Whoever came up with that
    > insipid, anemic-looking abomination should be forced to eat a whole
    > pound of it, at one sitting, on something hot.
    > Must remember to be much more observant when buying butter!
    >

    It's not *that* bad. I buy both. Hubby uses the spreadable butter
    that comes in a tub (a combination of real butter and olive oil) on
    his toast and I cook with regular butter.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  5. #5
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:30:44 -0400, Ross@home wrote:

    >Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    >sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    >taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    >pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    >butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    >of fat that is 25% less fat?

    ....

    Kinda the way I felt when I first heard of sugar free candy. I make
    candy for Christmas, and sugar is pretty much the main ingredient in
    candy as far as I know!

    John Kuthe...

  6. #6
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    Ross@home wrote:
    >
    > "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    > water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    > of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    > bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    > hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    > unless they are specifically created for light butter."


    A cheesy new name for whipped butter then.

  7. #7
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 09:56:25 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:30:44 -0400, Ross@home wrote:
    >
    >> Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    >> sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    >> taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    >> pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    >> butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    >> of fat that is 25% less fat?
    >> Some quick research on a dairy-related web site explained that:
    >>
    >> "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    >> water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    >> of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    >> bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    >> hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    >> unless they are specifically created for light butter."
    >>
    >> Good for the dairy industry I guess, sell a product for the same price
    >> but make 25% of it just air and water. Whoever came up with that
    >> insipid, anemic-looking abomination should be forced to eat a whole
    >> pound of it, at one sitting, on something hot.
    >> Must remember to be much more observant when buying butter!
    >>

    >It's not *that* bad. I buy both. Hubby uses the spreadable butter
    >that comes in a tub (a combination of real butter and olive oil) on
    >his toast and I cook with regular butter.


    Wouldn't it make more sense to use regular butter but use like 25%
    less... or is that too difficult for yoose lard asses to comprehend?

  8. #8
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 19:45:01 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ross@home wrote:
    >>
    >> "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    >> water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    >> of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    >> bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    >> hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    >> unless they are specifically created for light butter."

    >
    >A cheesy new name for whipped butter then.


    Similar I guess.
    The same site as the light butter quote above,
    http://www.dairygoodness.ca/butter/types-of-butter
    has this to say:

    Whipped Butter
    Whipped butter is butter with air whipped into it to make a lighter,
    softer spread. It is often served in restaurants for spreading on
    dinner rolls or pancakes. Whipped butter is not interchangeable with
    regular butter for cooking or baking.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  9. #9
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:30:44 -0400, Ross@home wrote:
    >
    >> Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    >> sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    >> taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    >> pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    >> butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    >> of fat that is 25% less fat?
    >> Some quick research on a dairy-related web site explained that:
    >>
    >> "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    >> water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    >> of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    >> bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    >> hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    >> unless they are specifically created for light butter."
    >>
    >> Good for the dairy industry I guess, sell a product for the same price
    >> but make 25% of it just air and water. Whoever came up with that
    >> insipid, anemic-looking abomination should be forced to eat a whole
    >> pound of it, at one sitting, on something hot.
    >> Must remember to be much more observant when buying butter!
    >>

    > It's not *that* bad. I buy both. Hubby uses the spreadable butter
    > that comes in a tub (a combination of real butter and olive oil) on
    > his toast and I cook with regular butter.
    >

    Ah. Olivio? I started feeding my daughter that. The one I got
    contained flax seed oil too, and I had read that it might be good
    for her... mood? Condition? And it seemed to be. I guess I
    should point out to others that if they go this route, there is an
    Olivio butter and an Olivio margarine (I am not sure they call it
    that), and the latter was not what I got. I will also add that my
    daughter is a supertaster, and she was okay with the Olivio
    butter, but not I am also recalling that at first I was using a
    bit of both on her challah.

    --
    Jean B.

  10. #10
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.


    <Ross@home> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Opened a new pound of butter the other morning. Didn't look right,
    > sort of a sickly light yellow. Used it on my breakfast toast, didn't
    > taste right. Checked the label a little more closely. Seems one of the
    > pounds of butter we had picked up when last shopping was "Light"
    > butter. Little banner on the label says "25% less fat". WTF, a pound
    > of fat that is 25% less fat?
    > Some quick research on a dairy-related web site explained that:
    >
    > "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    > water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    > of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    > bread or crackers and isn't well suited to cooking or for melting on
    > hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn't be used in recipes
    > unless they are specifically created for light butter."
    >
    > Good for the dairy industry I guess, sell a product for the same price
    > but make 25% of it just air and water. Whoever came up with that
    > insipid, anemic-looking abomination should be forced to eat a whole
    > pound of it, at one sitting, on something hot.
    > Must remember to be much more observant when buying butter!
    >
    > Ross.
    > Southern Ontario, Canada


    Light butter = less butter, at the same or higher price.

    Water in butter = useless for many tasks where butter is otherwise ideal

    Cook out the air and water, and you're left with... expensive butter.

    MartyB



  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 19:17:14 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ah. Olivio? I started feeding my daughter that.


    I haven't seen anything called that name. This is "spreadable" butter
    and it's put out by the major butter brands. Land O Lakes is one of
    them.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 19:45:01 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ross@home wrote:
    > >
    > > "Light butter is traditional churned butter that has added air and
    > > water and is about 25% lower in butterfat than regular butter. Because
    > > of the added water, light butter is best used cold as a spread on
    > > bread or crackers and isn’t well suited to cooking or for melting on
    > > hot foods such as toast or popcorn. It shouldn’t be used in recipes
    > > unless they are specifically created for light butter."

    >
    > A cheesy new name for whipped butter then.


    I like whipped butter.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  13. #13
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    sf wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 19:17:14 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ah. Olivio? I started feeding my daughter that.

    >
    > I haven't seen anything called that name. This is "spreadable" butter
    > and it's put out by the major butter brands. Land O Lakes is one of
    > them.


    Interesting. I didn't know LoL did any such things. IIRC, Lee
    Iococca started the Olivio company. I think the product has
    changed though, and it is easy to get the wrong thing. The one I
    used contained butter, olive oil, and flax seed oil.

    --
    Jean B.

  14. #14
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    sf wrote:
    > Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> A cheesy new name for whipped butter then.

    >
    > I like whipped butter.


    So do I but I still get to laugh that it now has a new name for
    marketing purposes.

    Hmm. Cheesy. Cheesy butter could be okay. Or gross. Depending on
    what sort of spreadable cheese was added to it.

  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 23:18:07 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >> Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> A cheesy new name for whipped butter then.

    >>
    >> I like whipped butter.

    >
    > So do I but I still get to laugh that it now has a new name for
    > marketing purposes.


    Whipped butter is different than light butter. Unless your shipped
    butter has 40% or less butterfat per pound, it's still not "light
    butter". You can't make "light butter" just by whipping it.

    -sw

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 17:38:30 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The one I
    > used contained butter, olive oil, and flax seed oil.


    I haven't seen one with flax seed oil yet, but will keep an eye out
    for it - because it's probably coming soon to a store near me. Do you
    think flax oil is anything more than a marketing scheme?

    --

    You are what you eat, so avoid fruitcake and nuts.

  17. #17
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    sf wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 17:38:30 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The one I
    >> used contained butter, olive oil, and flax seed oil.

    >
    > I haven't seen one with flax seed oil yet, but will keep an eye out
    > for it - because it's probably coming soon to a store near me. Do you
    > think flax oil is anything more than a marketing scheme?
    >

    Yes, I do. I was buying that product up to spring 2009, I think,
    so it isn't new. I am wondering whether it disappeared.

    --
    Jean B.

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    On Thu, 21 Jun 2012 23:29:03 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > > On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 17:38:30 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> The one I
    > >> used contained butter, olive oil, and flax seed oil.

    > >
    > > I haven't seen one with flax seed oil yet, but will keep an eye out
    > > for it - because it's probably coming soon to a store near me. Do you
    > > think flax oil is anything more than a marketing scheme?
    > >

    > Yes, I do. I was buying that product up to spring 2009, I think,
    > so it isn't new. I am wondering whether it disappeared.


    Maybe I should expand my scope to "names" that aren't recognizable
    butter brands.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  19. #19
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Light butter.

    sf wrote:
    > On Thu, 21 Jun 2012 23:29:03 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 17:38:30 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> The one I
    >>>> used contained butter, olive oil, and flax seed oil.
    >>> I haven't seen one with flax seed oil yet, but will keep an eye out
    >>> for it - because it's probably coming soon to a store near me. Do you
    >>> think flax oil is anything more than a marketing scheme?
    >>>

    >> Yes, I do. I was buying that product up to spring 2009, I think,
    >> so it isn't new. I am wondering whether it disappeared.

    >
    > Maybe I should expand my scope to "names" that aren't recognizable
    > butter brands.
    >


    Possibly. I will try to remember to gaze at the various Olivio
    products when I am in that area of the store.

    --
    Jean B.

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