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Thread: Left the eggs in the car

  1. #41
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    J. Clarke wrote:

    >> Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people
    >> are.

    >
    > So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
    > dangerous to an adult human? Try again.
    >
    > (a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
    > can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
    > infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.
    >
    > (b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial growth--a
    > reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to bacterial growth.
    >
    > (c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the
    > egg.
    >
    > (d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella leaves
    > no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a pretty
    > good dose of the live bacteria.
    >
    > (e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
    > degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's read
    > over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.
    >
    > Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you need
    > to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying any eggs
    > that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.


    None of those points actually challenged what I wrote. I didn't say anything
    about the health of a chicken embryo. I didn't say anything about methods of
    killing the salmonella bacterium. I didn't say anything about the prevalence
    of salmonella in the chicken population.

    The CHICKEN WHICH LAID THE SALMONELLA-INFECTED EGG was obviously infected
    with salmonella. Chickens (along with turtles, iguanas, and doubtless
    numerous other species) routinely carry around salmonella with no apparent
    ill effects. That's what I wrote, and what you failed to address. Try again.

    Bob




  2. #42
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 5:27 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > barbie gee wrote:
    >> On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >>> J. Clarke wrote:
    >>>> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>>>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>>>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>>>>> they safe to eat?
    >>>
    >>>>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.
    >>>>
    >>>> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >>>> at normal egg temperature?
    >>>
    >>> I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    >>> at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.

    >>
    >> it was only overnight, and if the eggs weren't in any way broken, I'm
    >> still not convinced this would be an issue. I still want to know,
    >> how HOT was it? Was the car in the shade til the sun set, or what?

    >
    > The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.


    Which is cooler than the inside of a chicken. The yolk has been at
    chicken temperature for a day or so before the egg is laid, and if the
    egg is going to have salmonella inside it goes in when the yolk is formed.


  3. #43
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 9:12 PM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >
    >>> Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people
    >>> are.

    >>
    >> So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
    >> dangerous to an adult human? Try again.
    >>
    >> (a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
    >> can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
    >> infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.
    >>
    >> (b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial growth--a
    >> reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to bacterial growth.
    >>
    >> (c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the
    >> egg.
    >>
    >> (d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella leaves
    >> no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a pretty
    >> good dose of the live bacteria.
    >>
    >> (e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
    >> degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's read
    >> over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.
    >>
    >> Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you need
    >> to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying any eggs
    >> that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.

    >
    > None of those points actually challenged what I wrote. I didn't say anything
    > about the health of a chicken embryo. I didn't say anything about methods of
    > killing the salmonella bacterium. I didn't say anything about the prevalence
    > of salmonella in the chicken population.
    >
    > The CHICKEN WHICH LAID THE SALMONELLA-INFECTED EGG was obviously infected
    > with salmonella. Chickens (along with turtles, iguanas, and doubtless
    > numerous other species) routinely carry around salmonella with no apparent
    > ill effects. That's what I wrote, and what you failed to address. Try again.


    Fine, live your life in terror of food.

  4. #44
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 4:04 PM, Steve B wrote:
    > "J. Clarke"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>> "sharkman"<shark@ver[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:i2ubnh$oen$[email protected]..
    >>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they
    >>>> safe
    >>>> to eat?
    >>>>
    >>>> thanks
    >>>> sharkman
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

    >>
    >> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting at
    >> normal egg temperature?

    >
    > I HAD A BRAINSTORM! GAWD, I AM SMART!
    >
    > I Googled "salmonella in raw eggs." I found out two things, which seem to
    > contradict each other. One is that the occurrence of salmonella is so low
    > that the average person is exposed to one salmonella contaminated egg every
    > 84 years.
    >
    > Second, temperatures in a car in the sun are highly conducive to the growth
    > of salmonella IF IT IS THERE IN THE FIRST PLACE.
    >
    > Google is your friend. Become an expert on salmonella in raw eggs in an
    > hour or less. Impress your friends.
    >
    > I learned that salmonella is not very common among healthy chickens, and the
    > incidents of salmonella contaminated eggs are not very common.
    >
    > But for a dollar, why take the chance.
    >
    > Salmonella poisoning can kill you.


    Driving to the store to get more eggs is sixty times more likely to kill
    you. Most cases of salmonella don't even result in a doctor visit. For
    it to kill you you have to already have somethine else wrong with you.

  5. #45
    sharkman Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    Just to follow up, I took a chance and tried the eggs and I survived so
    fa......arggggggghhhhh...

    thanks
    sharkman
    --


    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 8/1/2010 9:12 PM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >> J. Clarke wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people
    >>>> are.
    >>>
    >>> So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
    >>> dangerous to an adult human? Try again.
    >>>
    >>> (a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
    >>> can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
    >>> infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.
    >>>
    >>> (b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial
    >>> growth--a
    >>> reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to bacterial
    >>> growth.
    >>>
    >>> (c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the
    >>> egg.
    >>>
    >>> (d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella
    >>> leaves
    >>> no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a pretty
    >>> good dose of the live bacteria.
    >>>
    >>> (e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
    >>> degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's
    >>> read
    >>> over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.
    >>>
    >>> Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you
    >>> need
    >>> to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying any
    >>> eggs
    >>> that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.

    >>
    >> None of those points actually challenged what I wrote. I didn't say
    >> anything
    >> about the health of a chicken embryo. I didn't say anything about methods
    >> of
    >> killing the salmonella bacterium. I didn't say anything about the
    >> prevalence
    >> of salmonella in the chicken population.
    >>
    >> The CHICKEN WHICH LAID THE SALMONELLA-INFECTED EGG was obviously infected
    >> with salmonella. Chickens (along with turtles, iguanas, and doubtless
    >> numerous other species) routinely carry around salmonella with no
    >> apparent
    >> ill effects. That's what I wrote, and what you failed to address. Try
    >> again.

    >
    > Fine, live your life in terror of food.



  6. #46
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Driving to the store to get more eggs is sixty times more likely to kill
    > you. Most cases of salmonella don't even result in a doctor visit. For
    > it to kill you you have to already have somethine else wrong with you.


    That is a good point. ;-)

    I've actually had Salmonella, once, but it resulted from eating a RAW
    egg that had a damaged shell. I was stupid for eating it in the first
    place. And it was from my own backyard hens to boot.

    If you cook the eggs, there should be no danger from Salmonella just
    because they sat in a hot car overnight.

    I was unable to keep anything down but water for 3 days and had chills
    and fever the first day. I finally went to the ER the 3rd day because I
    was so damned miserable.

    Doc' gave me an antibiotic prescription and something for the cramping
    (can't recall the drug) and it took me 3 more days to recover. My
    co-worker that did the lab work was concerned and sent it off for
    e-coli 0157-h7 because it was bloody.

    Would I have recovered on my own? Statistics say yes. I suspect that
    due to the fact the egg was raw and damaged, I just got an exceptionally
    large dose of the bugs. My immune system was not compromised as far as
    I know either.

    Do I still eat raw eggs?

    Occasionally... but I'm very careful to inspect ALL eggs before purchase
    and never buy ones with even a hint of cracks, crazes or any hints of
    damage whatsoever.

    Any eggs I miss with a cracked shell get tossed.

    But, if you are that worried about it, a $1.00 carton of eggs is not
    worth a $100.00 ER co-pay. ;-)

    Personally, I'd use them but if in doubt, toss it out!

    The decision is up to you...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  7. #47
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 8/1/2010 5:27 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > > barbie gee wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Nancy Young wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> J. Clarke wrote:
    > >>>> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    > >>>>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote
    > >>>
    > >>>>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    > >>>>>> they safe to eat?
    > >>>
    > >>>>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    > >>>> at normal egg temperature?
    > >>>
    > >>> I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    > >>> at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.
    > >>
    > >> it was only overnight, and if the eggs weren't in any way broken, I'm
    > >> still not convinced this would be an issue. I still want to know,
    > >> how HOT was it? Was the car in the shade til the sun set, or what?

    > >
    > > The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.

    >
    > Which is cooler than the inside of a chicken. The yolk has been at
    > chicken temperature for a day or so before the egg is laid, and if the
    > egg is going to have salmonella inside it goes in when the yolk is formed.


    The only drawback to that reasoning is that non-refrigeration will allow
    any bacteria present to multiply. Refrigeration inhibits that.

    But, as long as they were cooked, I'd still use them...

    I used to keep cartons of eggs in my locker at work to keep co-workers
    from stealing them out of the refrigerator. Those eggs were always
    cooked tho'.

    No problems. ;-)

    I also store eggs are room temp for about 3 days or so prior to hard
    boiling them. The eggs from our local grocery store are so fresh,
    peeling them is a real problem. The 3 days of room temp storage make
    hard boiled eggs a breeze to peel every time. Just make sure that they
    are still at room temp. when you put them in to boil.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  8. #48
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/2/2010 7:23 AM, sharkman wrote:
    > Just to follow up, I took a chance and tried the eggs and I survived
    > so fa......arggggggghhhhh...
    >
    > thanks
    > sharkman


    It is nice to know you lived, thanks for letting us know that you are
    fine.... so far. ;-)

    B

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