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Thread: Left the eggs in the car

  1. #21
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 7/30/2010 7:06 AM, sharkman wrote:
    > > overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they
    > > safe to eat?

    >
    > The do fine over ninety overnight under a chicken.


    For hatching, my target temp was 101 degrees F. in an incubator.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  2. #22
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 7/30/2010 6:06 AM, sharkman wrote:
    > > overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they
    > > safe to eat?
    > >
    > > thanks
    > > sharkman
    > >

    >
    > Chickens sit on eggs for 3 weeks and they seem fine. ;-) Refrigerate
    > the eggs now, and make sure they are fully cooked to destroy any
    > bacteria. I am going to boil a carton of fresh eggs, so they have been
    > sitting on the kitchen for about 3 days. Some countries never
    > refrigerate their eggs, and my mother never refrigerated eggs or butter
    > while I was growing up.
    >
    > B


    I get easier peeling for hard boiled eggs if I let them sit at room temp
    for a day or three as well. It really makes a drastic difference.

    And the eggs are fine as long as there are no damaged shells. I do
    inspect them!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  3. #23
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On Jul 30, 6:06*am, "sharkman" <sh...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they safe
    > to eat?



    It's not terribly cool inside a chicken!

    Sure!! :-)

    John Kuthe...

  4. #24
    Kswck Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car


    "sharkman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:i2ubnh$oen$[email protected]..
    > overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they safe
    > to eat?
    >
    > thanks
    > sharkman
    >
    > --
    >
    >

    If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.



  5. #25
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    > "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:i2ubnh$oen$[email protected]..
    >> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they safe
    >> to eat?
    >>
    >> thanks
    >> sharkman
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >>

    > If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.


    But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting at
    normal egg temperature?



  6. #26
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote


    >>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>> they safe to eat?


    >> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

    >
    > But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    > at normal egg temperature?


    I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.

    nancy

  7. #27
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On Sun, 1 Aug 2010 10:56:09 -0400, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >J. Clarke wrote:
    >> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote

    >
    >>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>>> they safe to eat?

    >
    >>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

    >>
    >> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >> at normal egg temperature?

    >
    >I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    >at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.


    Normal egg temperature is substantially higher than normal room
    temperature.

  8. #28
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 10:56 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote

    >
    >>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>>> they safe to eat?

    >
    >>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

    >>
    >> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >> at normal egg temperature?

    >
    > I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    > at room temperature,


    Neither is a chicken.

    > they were in a hot car. FWIW.


    Chicken temperature is 108F. The normal condition of an egg in nature
    is to be inside or underneath a chicken for 21 days. If you want
    fertilized eggs to hatch in an incubator you keep it at about 100
    degrees F. If the conditions inside an egg were such that toxins
    sufficient to cause food poisoning developed in 24 hours at chicken
    temperature then the chicken would long since have become extinct.





  9. #29
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    J. Clarke:

    > Chicken temperature is 108F. The normal condition of an egg in nature is
    > to be inside or underneath a chicken for 21 days. If you want fertilized
    > eggs to hatch in an incubator you keep it at about 100 degrees F. If the
    > conditions inside an egg were such that toxins sufficient to cause food
    > poisoning developed in 24 hours at chicken temperature then the chicken
    > would long since have become extinct.


    Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people are.

    Bob




  10. #30
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > On 8/1/2010 10:56 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    >> J. Clarke wrote:


    >>> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >>> at normal egg temperature?

    >>
    >> I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    >> at room temperature,

    >
    > Neither is a chicken.


    I'm just responding to what you said, room temperature.

    nancy

  11. #31
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 12:50 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >> On 8/1/2010 10:56 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    >>> J. Clarke wrote:

    >
    >>>> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >>>> at normal egg temperature?
    >>>
    >>> I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    >>> at room temperature,

    >>
    >> Neither is a chicken.

    >
    > I'm just responding to what you said, room temperature.


    Where did I say "room temperature"? I said "normal egg temperature".

  12. #32
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    On 8/1/2010 12:40 PM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > J. Clarke:
    >
    >> Chicken temperature is 108F. The normal condition of an egg in nature is
    >> to be inside or underneath a chicken for 21 days. If you want fertilized
    >> eggs to hatch in an incubator you keep it at about 100 degrees F. If the
    >> conditions inside an egg were such that toxins sufficient to cause food
    >> poisoning developed in 24 hours at chicken temperature then the chicken
    >> would long since have become extinct.

    >
    > Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people are.


    So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
    dangerous to an adult human? Try again.

    (a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
    can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
    infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.

    (b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial
    growth--a reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to
    bacterial growth.

    (c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the egg.

    (d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella
    leaves no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a
    pretty good dose of the live bacteria.

    (e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
    degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's
    read over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.

    Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you
    need to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying
    any eggs that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.



  13. #33
    barbie gee Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car



    On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Nancy Young wrote:

    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote

    >
    >>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>>> they safe to eat?

    >
    >>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

    >>
    >> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >> at normal egg temperature?

    >
    > I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    > at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.


    it was only overnight, and if the eggs weren't in any way broken, I'm
    still not convinced this would be an issue. I still want to know, how HOT
    was it? Was the car in the shade til the sun set, or what?

  14. #34
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car


    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:i2ubnh$oen$[email protected]..
    >>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they
    >>> safe
    >>> to eat?
    >>>
    >>> thanks
    >>> sharkman
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>>

    >> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

    >
    > But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting at
    > normal egg temperature?


    I HAD A BRAINSTORM! GAWD, I AM SMART!

    I Googled "salmonella in raw eggs." I found out two things, which seem to
    contradict each other. One is that the occurrence of salmonella is so low
    that the average person is exposed to one salmonella contaminated egg every
    84 years.

    Second, temperatures in a car in the sun are highly conducive to the growth
    of salmonella IF IT IS THERE IN THE FIRST PLACE.

    Google is your friend. Become an expert on salmonella in raw eggs in an
    hour or less. Impress your friends.

    I learned that salmonella is not very common among healthy chickens, and the
    incidents of salmonella contaminated eggs are not very common.

    But for a dollar, why take the chance.

    Salmonella poisoning can kill you.

    Steve

    visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com




  15. #35
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    barbie gee wrote:
    > On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    >> J. Clarke wrote:
    >>> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote

    >>
    >>>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>>>> they safe to eat?

    >>
    >>>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.
    >>>
    >>> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >>> at normal egg temperature?

    >>
    >> I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    >> at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.

    >
    > it was only overnight, and if the eggs weren't in any way broken, I'm
    > still not convinced this would be an issue. I still want to know,
    > how HOT was it? Was the car in the shade til the sun set, or what?


    The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.

    nancy

  16. #36
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    barbie gee wrote:
    > On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    >> J. Clarke wrote:
    >>> On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
    >>>> "sharkman"<[email protected]> wrote

    >>
    >>>>> overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
    >>>>> they safe to eat?

    >>
    >>>> If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.
    >>>
    >>> But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
    >>> at normal egg temperature?

    >>
    >> I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
    >> at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.

    >
    > it was only overnight, and if the eggs weren't in any way broken, I'm
    > still not convinced this would be an issue. I still want to know,
    > how HOT was it? Was the car in the shade til the sun set, or what?


    The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.

    nancy

  17. #37
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.


    I'm willing to bet his life on it that
    they are safe to eat.

  18. #38
    barbie gee Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car



    On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >> The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.

    >
    > I'm willing to bet his life on it that
    > they are safe to eat.
    >


    exactly. we (humans, inside us) are always at 98.6 plus/minus a tad, and
    as someone else mentioned, it's 108 deg. F under a chicken.




  19. #39
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    barbie gee wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > > Nancy Young wrote:
    > >>
    > >> The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.

    > >
    > > I'm willing to bet his life on it that
    > > they are safe to eat.
    > >

    >
    > exactly. we (humans, inside us) are always at 98.6 plus/minus a tad, and
    > as someone else mentioned, it's 108 deg. F under a chicken.


    Actually, I'm pretty much willing to bet someone else's
    life on darn near anything. Live life close to the edge,
    that's what I say, as long as it's not your own.

  20. #40
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Left the eggs in the car

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >> The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.

    >
    > I'm willing to bet his life on it that
    > they are safe to eat.


    (laugh) Yeah, so long as it's not your life.

    Personally, I'd toss the eggs out, I'm not big on taking
    bad food chances. Just that one case of food poisoning did
    it for me.

    nancy

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