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Thread: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

  1. #1
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.

    Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.

    Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian
    in 1860s. Germany pretended to own Mexico.

    Marachi bands working the tourist strip can sound very much like
    German "oom-pah-pah" music.
    --
    mad

  2. #2
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On May 20, 1:25*pm, Mack A. Damia <mybaconbu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >
    > Pretty good. *I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >
    > Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian
    > in 1860s. *Germany pretended to own Mexico.
    >
    > Marachi bands working the tourist strip can sound very much like
    > German "oom-pah-pah" music.
    > --

    According to the National Geographic world music article about Mexico,
    German music began to influence Mexican in the early 19th century with
    the polka and the waltz. A strong second influence came from German
    American migration to Mexico in the 1930s, bringing the button
    accordion and contributing heavily to norteño music.

    I assume your wanderings around Ensenada have taken you to the pier
    for fish tacos? -aem



  3. #3
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Wed, 20 May 2009 13:47:36 -0700 (PDT), [email protected] wrote:

    >On May 20, 1:25*pm, Mack A. Damia <mybaconbu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >>
    >> Pretty good. *I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >>
    >> Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian
    >> in 1860s. *Germany pretended to own Mexico.
    >>
    >> Marachi bands working the tourist strip can sound very much like
    >> German "oom-pah-pah" music.
    >> --

    >According to the National Geographic world music article about Mexico,
    >German music began to influence Mexican in the early 19th century with
    >the polka and the waltz. A strong second influence came from German
    >American migration to Mexico in the 1930s, bringing the button
    >accordion and contributing heavily to norteño music.
    >
    >I assume your wanderings around Ensenada have taken you to the pier
    >for fish tacos? -aem


    We were talking in another thread about the dangers of eating from
    street vendors in Mexico.

    You're safe in the tourist spots. I think Janet mentioned La
    Buffadora - but the food from street vendors is safe there, too. It's
    very popular.

    Authorities are very careful to keep the tourist areas safe and clean,
    believe me.

    I became sick from eating a fish taco in a little village ten miles
    from Ensenada, but I've never heard of any problems in the city and
    tourist spots.

    Puerto Nuevo, about thirty miles north, is famous for its lobsters,
    too. That's a wild place on a Saturday night - it a walled village of
    restaurants serving lobster and tequilla.

    --
    mad

    mad

  4. #4
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Wed, 20 May 2009 16:17:16 -0500, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> On May 20, 1:25 pm, Mack A. Damia <mybaconbu...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>> Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >>>
    >>> Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >>>
    >>> Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian
    >>> in 1860s. Germany pretended to own Mexico.
    >>>
    >>> Marachi bands working the tourist strip can sound very much like
    >>> German "oom-pah-pah" music.
    >>> --

    >> According to the National Geographic world music article about Mexico,
    >> German music began to influence Mexican in the early 19th century with
    >> the polka and the waltz. A strong second influence came from German
    >> American migration to Mexico in the 1930s, bringing the button
    >> accordion and contributing heavily to norteño music.
    >>
    >> I assume your wanderings around Ensenada have taken you to the pier
    >> for fish tacos? -aem
    >>
    >>

    >Poles and the Irish have also richly contributed to the society in
    >Mexico. Used to buy Oso Negro vodka in Matamoros on a regular basis. The
    >peppery Polish kind, made by a Polish family that has been in Mexico for
    >dogs years. The El Presidente brandy in Mexico is a tasty brand too.


    I'm drinking Don Pedro, and it's fine by me.

    >Lots of Mexican women named Olga, Helga, and such Scandinavian names.
    >Wondered about it until a Mexican priest told me they were all Saint's
    >names.


    There's a large Russian community about twenty miles away - a convent
    of sisters from Sweden, too.

    Lots of Asians -especially in the fishing industry. There are
    Japanese/oriental restaurants all over Ensenada - but you have to be
    selective because many of them will cater to the Mexican tastes, and
    you'll wind up with beans and rice Mexcian style.

    I drink Oso, too. It makes me Oso drunk.
    --
    mad


  5. #5
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >
    > Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >
    > Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian


    Germans had nothing to do with it. The French invaded Mexico in 1862 to
    enforce payment of debts and to deter democratic movements. They along
    with Mexican monarchist elements convinced Maximillian to become
    emperor. The military presence was French. It was the Spanish who
    introduced sausage to Mexico. Chorizo and longaniza are both words
    applied to sausages in Spain. There was a lot of emigration out of the
    German speaking states during the 19th century to all of the Americas so
    German cultural fragments do exist along with those of other cultures.
    I've dined in several chinese restaurants in Mexico.
    >
    > Marachi(sic) bands working the tourist strip can sound very much like
    > German "oom-pah-pah" music.


    More myth. Trumpets were added to Mariachi groups when they first
    started to record in the 1920's. You may be confusing Mariachi with
    Bandas which are truly brass bands.

    D.M.

  6. #6
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Wed, 20 May 2009 17:46:46 -0700, Don Martinich <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >>
    >> Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >>
    >> Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian

    >
    >Germans had nothing to do with it.


    That statement is incorrect.

    > The French invaded Mexico in 1862 to
    >enforce payment of debts and to deter democratic movements. They along
    >with Mexican monarchist elements convinced Maximillian to become
    >emperor. The military presence was French. It was the Spanish who
    >introduced sausage to Mexico. Chorizo and longaniza are both words
    >applied to sausages in Spain. There was a lot of emigration out of the
    >German speaking states during the 19th century to all of the Americas so
    >German cultural fragments do exist along with those of other cultures.
    >I've dined in several chinese restaurants in Mexico.


    I wasn't teaching a history lesson, Bub. I was merely pointing out
    the influence of one ethnic group -the Germans whose sausage-making
    skills were imported as well as other German culture.

    >> Marachi(sic) bands working the tourist strip can sound very much like
    >> German "oom-pah-pah" music.

    >
    >More myth. Trumpets were added to Mariachi groups when they first
    >started to record in the 1920's. You may be confusing Mariachi with
    >Bandas which are truly brass bands.


    Maybe, but they are the bands that roam the tourist areas - regardless
    of what they are called, they sometimes sound like German "oom pah
    pah" music -the influence is definitely there.
    --
    mad






  7. #7
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    "Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    > Don Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >>>
    >>> Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >>>
    >>> Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian

    >>
    >>Germans had nothing to do with it.

    >
    > That statement is incorrect.
    >

    That statement is correct.
    Maximilian was
    (a) a French puppet
    (b) an Austrian

    While there is a German influence, it had nothing to do with Maximilian.

    <snip>

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  8. #8
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Thu, 21 May 2009 12:51:06 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    >> Don Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >>>>
    >>>> Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >>>>
    >>>> Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian
    >>>
    >>>Germans had nothing to do with it.

    >>
    >> That statement is incorrect.
    >>

    >That statement is correct.


    What statement? My statement is, "There is decent wurst in Mexico'
    (brought in recipes by immigrants).

    So you are saying there is no decent wurst in Mexico?

    >Maximilian was
    >(a) a French puppet
    >(b) an Austrian


    Germany pretended to own Mexico in the 1860's. Many countries
    including the U.S. did not recognize them.

    >While there is a German influence, it had nothing to do with Maximilian.


    Most Austrians considered themselves German. Austrians love sausage,
    too. Max was a Hapsburg (burg?)

    Actally the statement stood alone. Everything I said is correct. You
    are the one making connections. As I said, this wasn't a history
    lesson

    German culture flourished in Mexico in the 1800s. It was spurred by
    increased immigration - Germans/Austrians and Eastern Europeans
    flocked to America's shores bringing there cultures with them.

    To deny this is sheer stupidity.

    The Mexicans had chorizo from Spain - highly spiced to preserve it -
    the Germans added their skills and recipes over the decades.

    (Deitrich Chorizo is a brand here)

    The Mexicans call all sausage chorizo. I can buy German wurst as well
    as English sausages (bangers) - all made locally.

    Best of the day!~
    mad

  9. #9
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    "Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    > "Michael Kuettner"wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    >>> Don Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Chorizo con Chipotle Y Cilantro.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Pretty good. I'm trying it with a number of mustards/sauces.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Decent wurst in Mexico. Large German population - Emperor Maximillian
    >>>>
    >>>>Germans had nothing to do with it.
    >>>
    >>> That statement is incorrect.
    >>>

    >>That statement is correct.

    >
    > What statement? My statement is, "There is decent wurst in Mexico'
    > (brought in recipes by immigrants).
    >
    > So you are saying there is no decent wurst in Mexico?
    >

    No, I'm saying that the German influence had nothing to do with
    the _French_ occupation with Maximilian as figure-head.

    >>Maximilian was
    >>(a) a French puppet
    >>(b) an Austrian

    >
    > Germany pretended to own Mexico in the 1860's. Many countries
    > including the U.S. did not recognize them.
    >

    Since there was no Germany until 1871, that would be a neat trick.

    >>While there is a German influence, it had nothing to do with Maximilian.

    >
    > Most Austrians considered themselves German.


    Nonsense.
    The question was whether the German speaking countries of the ex -
    Holy Roman Empire of German Nation would be unified under Austrian
    or Prussian rule. We lost in 1866.

    > Austrians love sausage, too. Max was a Hapsburg (burg?)
    >

    Habsburg. But of a side-line.
    And yes, we like our sausages. Thusly our "Würstlstand", a shop
    where you can buy hot sausages (Frankfurter, Burenwurst, Debreziner,
    Weißwurst, Bratwurst, etc) as a snack until 5 in the morning.

    > Actally the statement stood alone. Everything I said is correct. You
    > are the one making connections. As I said, this wasn't a history
    > lesson
    >

    Well, then don't try to make statements about history.

    > German culture flourished in Mexico in the 1800s.


    Which German culture ?
    The culture in Germany after 1871 was definitely different from
    the culture of the Holy Roman Empire.

    > It was spurred by
    > increased immigration - Germans/Austrians and Eastern Europeans
    > flocked to America's shores bringing there cultures with them.
    >

    Nobody claimed otherwise.

    > To deny this is sheer stupidity.
    >

    Yes. But that immigration had nothing to do with Maximilian.

    > The Mexicans had chorizo from Spain - highly spiced to preserve it -
    > the Germans added their skills and recipes over the decades.
    >
    > (Deitrich Chorizo is a brand here)
    >

    Deitrich or Dietrich ?

    > The Mexicans call all sausage chorizo. I can buy German wurst as well
    > as English sausages (bangers) - all made locally.
    >
    > Best of the day!~
    > mad


    Servus,

    Michael Kuettner




  10. #10
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 13:50:20 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> Germany pretended to own Mexico in the 1860's. Many countries
    >> including the U.S. did not recognize them.
    >>

    >Since there was no Germany until 1871, that would be a neat trick.


    I'm not going to continue this "debate" after this message, cuz it
    ain't one.

    "A region named Germania inhabited by several Germanic peoples has
    been known and documented before AD 100. Beginning in the 10th
    century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman
    Empire that lasted until 1806. During the 16th century, northern
    Germany became the centre of the Protestant Reformation. As a modern
    nation-state, the country was first unified amidst the Franco-Prussian
    War in 1871."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany

    So there were Germanic tribes and Germanic territories before 1870.
    Golly, do you think they had any culture - maybe "sausage making"?

    >>>While there is a German influence, it had nothing to do with Maximilian.

    >>
    >> Most Austrians considered themselves German.

    >
    >Nonsense.


    Why do you think Hitler annexed Austria in 1938?

    >The question was whether the German speaking countries of the ex -
    >Holy Roman Empire of German Nation would be unified under Austrian
    >or Prussian rule. We lost in 1866.


    This isn't about hostory and politics, it's about food.

    >> Austrians love sausage, too. Max was a Hapsburg (burg?)
    >>

    >Habsburg. But of a side-line.
    >And yes, we like our sausages. Thusly our "Würstlstand", a shop
    >where you can buy hot sausages (Frankfurter, Burenwurst, Debreziner,
    >Weißwurst, Bratwurst, etc) as a snack until 5 in the morning.
    >
    >> Actally the statement stood alone. Everything I said is correct. You
    >> are the one making connections. As I said, this wasn't a history
    >> lesson
    >>

    >Well, then don't try to make statements about history.


    German culture in Mexico - that was the focus.
    >
    >> German culture flourished in Mexico in the 1800s.


    >Which German culture ?


    Culture doesn't stop at political boundary lines.

    >The culture in Germany after 1871 was definitely different from
    >the culture of the Holy Roman Empire.


    That sounds stupid!

    You mean on Decmeber 31, 1871, Otto blew the whistle and said, "time
    to change cultures"?

    >> It was spurred by
    >> increased immigration - Germans/Austrians and Eastern Europeans
    >> flocked to America's shores bringing there cultures with them.
    >>

    >Nobody claimed otherwise.
    >
    >> To deny this is sheer stupidity.
    >>

    >Yes. But that immigration had nothing to do with Maximilian.


    German culture, which is what I've said from the beginning.

    >> The Mexicans had chorizo from Spain - highly spiced to preserve it -
    >> the Germans added their skills and recipes over the decades.
    >>
    >> (Deitrich Chorizo is a brand here)
    >>

    >Deitrich or Dietrich ?
    >
    >> The Mexicans call all sausage chorizo. I can buy German wurst as well
    >> as English sausages (bangers) - all made locally.
    >>
    >> Best of the day!~
    >> mad

    >
    >Servus,
    >
    >Michael Kuettner


    You're contentious and pedantic, old chap, and don't focus on the
    issues. The theme was German culture in Mexico, and everything I
    mentioned was relevent..

    I'll mentioned Hitler invading Austria again. He was born in Austria
    and considerd himself a German -as many Austrians did.

    Godwin's Law. End of thread.
    --
    mad

  11. #11
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    "Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    > On Fri, 22 May 2009 13:50:20 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> Germany pretended to own Mexico in the 1860's. Many countries
    >>> including the U.S. did not recognize them.
    >>>

    >>Since there was no Germany until 1871, that would be a neat trick.

    >
    > I'm not going to continue this "debate" after this message, cuz it
    > ain't one.
    >

    That's OK with me ...

    > "A region named Germania inhabited by several Germanic peoples has
    > been known and documented before AD 100. Beginning in the 10th
    > century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman
    > Empire that lasted until 1806. During the 16th century, northern
    > Germany became the centre of the Protestant Reformation. As a modern
    > nation-state, the country was first unified amidst the Franco-Prussian
    > War in 1871."
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germany
    >
    > So there were Germanic tribes and Germanic territories before 1870.
    > Golly, do you think they had any culture - maybe "sausage making"?
    >

    Please note the difference between "Germanic tribes" and Germany.
    And nothing in the Wikipedia link contradicts anything I've said.
    Now write a short essay telling us the common culture of Bavaria and
    Frisia. It'll be a rather short essay ...
    A hint : You're being mislead by the vagaries of the English language.
    In German it's "Germanen" and "Deutschland", and thusly "germanisch"
    and "deutsch", which isn't as misleading as "germanic" and "german".

    >>>>While there is a German influence, it had nothing to do with Maximilian.
    >>>
    >>> Most Austrians considered themselves German.

    >>
    >>Nonsense.

    >
    > Why do you think Hitler annexed Austria in 1938?
    >

    (a) Because the 3rd Reich was bankrupt. He needed the gold
    reserves and the foreign currency reserves of the Austrian Natonal
    Bank to buy goods necessary for arms production. Those were
    only sold for hard currency; which the Reichsmark wasn't.
    (b) Misguided ideology and other delusions
    (c) Various strategic reasons
    (d) Remember my hint about 1866 (Königgrätz)

    >>The question was whether the German speaking countries of the ex -
    >>Holy Roman Empire of German Nation would be unified under Austrian
    >>or Prussian rule. We lost in 1866.

    >
    > This isn't about hostory and politics, it's about food.
    >

    My point is only about the historical aspect.

    >>> Austrians love sausage, too. Max was a Hapsburg (burg?)
    >>>

    >>Habsburg. But of a side-line.
    >>And yes, we like our sausages. Thusly our "Würstlstand", a shop
    >>where you can buy hot sausages (Frankfurter, Burenwurst, Debreziner,
    >>Weißwurst, Bratwurst, etc) as a snack until 5 in the morning.
    >>
    >>> Actally the statement stood alone. Everything I said is correct. You
    >>> are the one making connections. As I said, this wasn't a history
    >>> lesson
    >>>

    >>Well, then don't try to make statements about history.

    >
    > German culture in Mexico - that was the focus.


    What German culture ?
    The Walzer is Austrian; Stelze is Bavarian and Austrian;
    Eisbein is Northern German.
    I could go on ...

    >>
    >>> German culture flourished in Mexico in the 1800s.

    >
    >>Which German culture ?

    >
    > Culture doesn't stop at political boundary lines.
    >
    >>The culture in Germany after 1871 was definitely different from
    >>the culture of the Holy Roman Empire.

    >
    > That sounds stupid!
    >
    > You mean on Decmeber 31, 1871, Otto blew the whistle and said, "time
    > to change cultures"?
    >

    No, the "Kleindeutsche Lösung" (unification under Prussia) generated
    first the national myth of the new nation. Germanic ancestors -> Arier
    -> two world wars.
    That's of course the short version; but it would take too long to explain
    how Prussia imprinted itself on nowadays Germany.

    >>> It was spurred by
    >>> increased immigration - Germans/Austrians and Eastern Europeans
    >>> flocked to America's shores bringing there cultures with them.
    >>>

    >>Nobody claimed otherwise.
    >>
    >>> To deny this is sheer stupidity.
    >>>

    >>Yes. But that immigration had nothing to do with Maximilian.

    >
    > German culture, which is what I've said from the beginning.
    >

    What German culture ? see above ...

    >>> The Mexicans had chorizo from Spain - highly spiced to preserve it -
    >>> the Germans added their skills and recipes over the decades.
    >>>
    >>> (Deitrich Chorizo is a brand here)
    >>>

    >>Deitrich or Dietrich ?
    >>
    >>> The Mexicans call all sausage chorizo. I can buy German wurst as well
    >>> as English sausages (bangers) - all made locally.
    >>>
    >>> Best of the day!~
    >>> mad

    >>
    >>Servus,
    >>
    >>Michael Kuettner

    >
    > You're contentious and pedantic,


    Pedantic ? I'm just telling you that you know less about Europe
    than you think.

    > old chap, and don't focus on the
    > issues. The theme was German culture in Mexico, and everything I
    > mentioned was relevent..
    >

    What German culture ? see above ...

    > I'll mentioned Hitler invading Austria again. He was born in Austria
    > and considerd himself a German -as many Austrians did.
    >
    > Godwin's Law. End of thread.


    Ah, we're from "most" down to "many". If you look up
    "Deusch-Nationale Partei" you'll find that the percentage dwindled
    to "some" after 1866.

    Good-bye and enjoy your ignorance.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner








  12. #12
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 17:44:52 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Good-bye and enjoy your ignorance.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >Michael Kuettner


    Right. I'm allowed to change my mind. As I said, you're one
    contentious soul. I think you must suffer, too.

    You can give your slant on history, and I can give mine. We really
    don't know cuz we weren't there.

    Your arguments are specious at best and you make assertions that are
    only speculation.

    There are millions of guys like you haunting Usenet to start arguments
    and flame instead of flowing with the issues.

    You also support your assertions with meaningless nitpicking - German
    versus Germanic, ad nauseum.

    The post was about German (Germanic) influences in Mexico - and all
    you could do is attempt to find fault.

    You silly twisted boy.
    --
    mad

  13. #13
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    "Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    > On Fri, 22 May 2009 17:44:52 +0200, "Michael Kuettner" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Good-bye and enjoy your ignorance.
    >>
    >>Cheers,
    >>
    >>Michael Kuettner

    >
    > Right. I'm allowed to change my mind. As I said, you're one
    > contentious soul. I think you must suffer, too.
    >

    I don't suffer from anything except Anglo-Saxon ignorance of
    European history.

    > You can give your slant on history, and I can give mine. We really
    > don't know cuz we weren't there.
    >

    What slant on history ?
    There was no "Germany" before 1871. That's a fact...

    > Your arguments are specious at best and you make assertions that are
    > only speculation.
    >

    Name some, my dear boy.
    You see, vague accusations without explicitly stating what you're
    objecting to makes you sound like a - well - kook.

    > There are millions of guys like you haunting Usenet to start arguments
    > and flame instead of flowing with the issues.
    >

    You think gentle corrections are a flame ?
    Curious ...

    > You also support your assertions with meaningless nitpicking - German
    > versus Germanic, ad nauseum.
    >

    Meaningless ? You really like to dig further down after reaching
    rock-bottom ?

    > The post was about German (Germanic) influences in Mexico - and all
    > you could do is attempt to find fault.
    >

    No, I corrected some points in your flawed world-view.
    You still haven't stated what you regard as "German" influences.
    Further, you failed to address any of my objections.

    > You silly twisted boy.


    Instead, the best you can come up with is silly name-calling.
    That's not a very good show, old boy.

    I know that most Anglo-Saxon speakers don't know very much about
    continental Europe. That's OK. But don't try to push your dumbed-down
    "history" as the real thing.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner







  14. #14
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    "Mack A. Damia" schrieb :
    > On Fri, 22 May 2009 17:44:52 +0200, "Michael Kuettner" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Good-bye and enjoy your ignorance.
    >>
    >>Cheers,
    >>
    >>Michael Kuettner

    >
    > Right. I'm allowed to change my mind. As I said, you're one
    > contentious soul. I think you must suffer, too.
    >

    I don't suffer from anything except Anglo-Saxon ignorance of
    European history.

    > You can give your slant on history, and I can give mine. We really
    > don't know cuz we weren't there.
    >

    What slant on history ?
    There was no "Germany" before 1871. That's a fact...

    > Your arguments are specious at best and you make assertions that are
    > only speculation.
    >

    Name some, my dear boy.
    You see, vague accusations without explicitly stating what you're
    objecting to makes you sound like a - well - kook.

    > There are millions of guys like you haunting Usenet to start arguments
    > and flame instead of flowing with the issues.
    >

    You think gentle corrections are a flame ?
    Curious ...

    > You also support your assertions with meaningless nitpicking - German
    > versus Germanic, ad nauseum.
    >

    Meaningless ? You really like to dig further down after reaching
    rock-bottom ?

    > The post was about German (Germanic) influences in Mexico - and all
    > you could do is attempt to find fault.
    >

    No, I corrected some points in your flawed world-view.
    You still haven't stated what you regard as "German" influences.
    Further, you failed to address any of my objections.

    > You silly twisted boy.


    Instead, the best you can come up with is silly name-calling.
    That's not a very good show, old boy.

    I know that most Anglo-Saxon speakers don't know very much about
    continental Europe. That's OK. But don't try to push your dumbed-down
    "history" as the real thing.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner







  15. #15
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    Any message posted twice doesn't count. One negates the other.

    Usenet Reg. 35.09, para 3.9.

    --
    mad

  16. #16
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 19:31:57 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    <*snip questionable history lesson*>

    Michael, there's more than Wikipedia.

    Spend some time in an actual library.
    --
    mad

  17. #17
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!


    "Mack A. Damia" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 22 May 2009 19:31:57 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > <*snip questionable history lesson*>
    >
    > Michael, there's more than Wikipedia.
    >
    > Spend some time in an actual library.


    I'm not really surprised about your evasions anymore.
    It was _you_ who quoted Wikipedia; a rather sure sign
    that you were talking out of your ass.

    As always, you've snipped anything you couldn't answer
    or contradict, i.e. : Everything.

    But your lack of any knowledge in European history and
    your back-pedalling are amusing to me.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner








  18. #18
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 20:54:17 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Mack A. Damia" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Fri, 22 May 2009 19:31:57 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> <*snip questionable history lesson*>
    >>
    >> Michael, there's more than Wikipedia.
    >>
    >> Spend some time in an actual library.

    >
    >I'm not really surprised about your evasions anymore.
    >It was _you_ who quoted Wikipedia; a rather sure sign
    >that you were talking out of your ass.


    Not really. The paragraph from Wiki is accurate. It was much easier
    to copy/paste and give the reference than it was to research my
    hisotry books.
    >
    >As always, you've snipped anything you couldn't answer
    >or contradict, i.e. : Everything.


    What are you talking about? I posted a message about sausage and the
    German influence on Mexican culture. You started the harrassment with
    your interpretation of what I wrote. That's all it was, too - your
    interpretation.

    You might make a good science fiction writer.

    >But your lack of any knowledge in European history and
    >your back-pedalling are amusing to me.


    Maybe, but I'm the one on a bicycle, and I'm back-pedaling circles
    around you on your tricycle.

    I don't pretend to be a walking encyclopedia. I know where to go for
    knowledge and information, though, when I need it, and I certainly
    don't need to prove German influence on Mexican culture.

    Again, you need to focus. Emphasis was on food, sausage and cultural
    influences. T'wasn't a history lesson. It's called, "being evasive".

    Read my first message again.

    >Cheers,
    >
    >Michael Kuettner


    Later......
    --
    mad

  19. #19
    Carmelia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    I used to spend winters in Mexico and I never got sick from eating the
    food. I was on a low budget and ate where the Nationals ate and not
    restaurants catering to tourists. It is not the food I am afraid
    of in Mexico these days but the crime. I am not as agile as I was and
    my hair is 100% white and I would feel like a prime target for the
    criminals. I hate being such a sissy because I loved Mexico!




    "Why are you so cautious? For what great purpose are you reserving
    yourself for?" - Rhett Butler




  20. #20
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Late Lunch, Sausage Lovers!

    On Fri, 22 May 2009 17:04:41 -0400, [email protected] (Carmelia)
    wrote:

    >I used to spend winters in Mexico and I never got sick from eating the
    >food. I was on a low budget and ate where the Nationals ate and not
    >restaurants catering to tourists. It is not the food I am afraid
    >of in Mexico these days but the crime. I am not as agile as I was and
    >my hair is 100% white and I would feel like a prime target for the
    >criminals. I hate being such a sissy because I loved Mexico!


    I can't tell you there's no violence, but what I can tell you is that
    it's fairly restricted to the border areas and certain neighborhoods.
    It's like anywhere else....if you want to find drugs and trouble, you
    can find it. Just a bit more salient in Mexico.

    There are a lot of us aging white/gray-haired gringos here, and we
    don't have any problems. Occasion burglaries of unoccupied homes.
    The police seem very protective of us here, too.

    The press has cruxified Mexico with drug crime/violence and the swine
    flu.

    Real problem is government bureaucracy which operates on a kind of
    "pecking order" where bureaucrats have very specific "turf", and may
    not step on another's. However, they can and do delegate to lower
    ranks...and they delegate and so on.

    Simple permits and the like can take years.

    The military is ubiquitous, and they search many Mexican vehicles -
    the tourists are usually not bothered.

    I feel safer here than in California.
    --
    mad

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